Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Blue Bonnet 1938-07-09
Page 2
File size: 572 KB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-07-09 - Page 2. July 9, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 27, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/918/show/915.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (July 9, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-07-09 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/918/show/915

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-07-09 - Page 2, July 9, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 27, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/918/show/915.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-07-09
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C, cartoonist
  • Beckwith, R. L. printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date July 9, 1938
Description Volume VII, Number 2
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 2
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
File Name _0599_L.pdf
Transcript -; THE BLUE BONNET;- A weekly publication of the ship's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G · N. Barker. U. S. N.• Commanding Officer and Commander C. A. Bailey. U. S. N.• Executive Officer. Editor. Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald; Assistant Editor. Ensign J. P. M. Johnston; As. sociate Editor, Stefan Sivak. Jr.• SKlc; Associate Editor. W. J. Bannen. Seale; Cartooniat W. C. Ridge; Printer. R. L. Beckwith. Seale. Page 2. OBLESSE OBLIGE " NOBLESSE OBLIGE" is French and it means " nobility obli­ges," i. e., the nobility of one's posi­tion in life makes a certain standard of conduct and obligation. We had the good fortune, several years ago, to see this exempli­fied in a charitable deed performed cheerfully by two distinguished Naval Officers, Rear Admiral J. M. Reeves ( Ret.) and the late Rear Admiral Ashley Robertson, then Commandant of the Eleventh aval District. Admiral Reeves, who at that time was a Captain in command of Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet, had lately returned to San Diego from Panama, in his Flagship, the Langley. Many problems assailed him. His air­planes were inferior and the casual­ties among his flyers were heavy. Yet one concern seemed to stand out acute­ly from the others. It had to do with a last minute transfer of a petty of­ficer on the eve of our sailing from Panama. Coco Solo Air Station need­ed a rigger and we had to send Bill Brown to fill the void. Before going over the side with bag and hammock, Brown confided in the Chaplain that his wife was ill in San Diego and that he hoped that transportation could be arranged for a passage to Panama. Brown took his bad streak in stride which only increased his popularity on the Langley. On the way North, Capt. Reeves learned of the forced separa­tion in the Brown family and decided that something must be done about it. A movement schedule told him that a avy transport would soon touch at San Diego and he felt sure that, however crowded the ship might be, there could always be room for just one more. Radio messages were sent and answered but the news published in the radio shack was bad - " no bunk available for Mrs. Brown." " By THE BLUE BO NET gad, we'll see about that," said Capt. Reeves. He sent for the Chaplain. " I want you to have Mrs. Brown pack her things and have her on the dock when the transport arrives. Get a nurse if necessary, I'll do the rest." The Captain stepped a­shore at about eleven that morning. As ' he walked to the office of the Dis­trict Commandant, we saw him turn his head and scowl at the gray sides of the big transport. He went to the office of Admiral Robertson, one of the best beloved of Naval officers. They agreed " Something can be done, something shall be done." They left the office together. I can still see them heading for the dock where the young wife, the Chaplain and the baggage stood. " Cheer up, young lady," cried Captain Reeves, " We'll get you to Co­co Solo or bust." Down the crowded dock they hurried and up the steep brow to the quarter deck. The O. O. D. said the Commanding Officer was a­shore. More delay. The ship was to sail at 1300. Eight bells, one bell, two bells. The Ship's Captain returned and found two determined officers await­ing him. At 1310 the siren sounded and last preparations were made for getting underway when the Admiral and Captain emerged from the crowd. " We found a bunk for you, Mrs. Brown. Bon voyage, and God bless you." With bag and baggage and a happy heart the rigger's wife sailed that day to rejoin her husband at Coco Solo. Needless to say the Ad­miral and Captain missed lunch that day, and I doubt that they even gave it a thought. There is " oblesse oblige" for you. Captain Reeves later became a four- star Admiral, Cam­mander- in- Chief of the U. S. Fleet. Admiral Robertson lies peacefully now near the grave of the unknown soldier at Arlington. Your uniform is a badge of nobility. It gives you a standard of conduct far above that of a man of the street. - W. A. M. Dear Marie, ' Twon't be long afore our hap­py home pokes her nose outa tha Navy Yard and starts a skitterin' over tha wave and foam. In this Navy a body can't be a hankerin' to anchor one place for more than a mite or he'll be finding his moorin's yanked up by tha roots afore they begin to take hold. So us Navies allus keep our bones primed for a changin' climate. S'pose your Pa is wonderin' when his grain'll be ready for cut­tin'. That stand in that upper eighty oughta run about 70 bushels per acre. Seems sorta funny now ' bout me once havin' to pitch in with tha threshin' crew at hayin' time, but guess I'll allus bear a soft place in my heart for farmin' tho they say I can't plow a straight furrow. Ma usta set such a heavy meal durin' threshin' time that we had to bring in the saw horses to keep tha table from bucklin'. ' Twas a sight to see that food disappearin'. I don't know what made tha most noise, tha eatin' or tha combine in tha field. We shure pack away tha food here, too. When tha crew's in a hun­gry mood tha mess cooks have to be runnin' on tha double for more vit­tles. They're so worn out by runnin' to tha galley that they soon rattle worse'n a bag 0' bones. That's why we gotta be relievin' ' em every three months. Well Marie, I'll be a sendin' you writin' matter from now on ' bout my traipsin's over tha globe. Tell Sal, I'm tickled pick she married that runt Felix Jackson. Maybe she'll beat some sense into his hollow head. Love, Gus