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1938-05-28
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1938-05-28 - Page 1. May 28, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/898/show/894.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 28, 1938). 1938-05-28 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/898/show/894

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

1938-05-28 - Page 1, May 28, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/898/show/894.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 1938-05-28
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Date May 28, 1938
Description Volume VI, Number 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • San Pedro, California
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0583_L.pdf
Transcript ....... ( Continued on page 4.) Houston Sub­dues Chester Easily Indianapolis Downed By Houston in ScoFor Melee Volume VI, Number 8. The Panay And E. R. Mahlman, C. B. M. WE WERE attacked presumably by nine planes. A flight of three heavy bombers came over and let go a load in flat bombing and one of them was a direct hit which got me, also Skipper Hughes who was on the bridge. There was a terrific con­cussion- it seemed as though the ship had been torn to pieces- and we were hurled from one side of the compart­ment-- the ship's office- to the other. Mterwards I found myself all tangled up with the steel office furniture, fil­ing cabinets, desks, etc.; also that I had acquired a fractured left leg- a bad one, too. Paxton and Webber, the yeoman, were unhurt. The Yangtze was pouring in through the warped plates and port holes that had been blown out. With Paxton and Webber pushing at my midsection and me struggling hand over hand, they were able to get me up the small ladder that led to the quarterdeck. I was crippled, flattened out; one " Swede" Mahlman, Chief Boatswain Mate, the kind of hero one sees on the silver screen, put me in a life jacket, and then put his all into the fight. If ever a man deserved a medal of honor for coolness and bravery under fire it is Mahlman, but I suppose his deeds will go unsung. He practically took command of the ship because the captain, the executive officer, and the engineering officer were all wounded. There was an ensign left ...., he had been the communication officer and he was a very young lad. Mahlman was all over the ship, one minute manning ( Continued on Page 4.) San Pedro, California Rip Tides T HE conditions in the ocean surf are entirely different from those encountered in a body of still water such as a bay, a lake, a plunge, or even a river. There are powerful opposing forces continually at play, treacherous currents, dangerous rips, strong tides. One day, the ocean may be calm, the next day, or even a few hours later, it may become very rough and dangerous. At one place, there may be a smooth level floor, ten yards to either side, a deep hole with a bad rip runing through it. Some days, one guard may successfully handle a thou­sand persons, then other days, many guards have great difficulty with just a few swimmers. Most of the trouble at the local beaches is caused by riptides. There are a few scattered cases of cramps, non- swimmers, persons being under the influence of liguor, etc., but it is safe to state that 90% of the trouble is attributable to rips. Of course, at times, the surf is so rough that it is dangerous to enter the water at all, but it is usually safe during the summer season. If a person is fore­warned about rip tides and is careful to avoid them, he should encounter very little danger. A person can be an ex­pert swimmer in still water, yet be practically helpless in the surf. The greatest trouble is caused by persons who enter a rip from the side. There is nearly always a parallel drag. At times this is so strong that a person is unable to remain in ( Continued on Pag., 2.) 28 May, 1938 Heckling Houstonites Hitting High T HE Houston's Base­ball team seems to be hitting · it off for the start of a swell season. With three games in the last week, the players are putting their best in for the Houston and a championship team. Under the able coaching of Worthing­ton, Shipfitter 1st Class, the team is doing its best, and pretty good it is too, for the honor of the Houston. Although playing somewhat ragged baseball on the de­fense, the Houston Nine easily outslug­ged the Chester team to win decisive­ly 15 to 7. Leading the attack for the Rambler Ship was Wright, who had 3 hits, a walk, and was given first after being hit by a pitched ball, for a perfect day at bat. Chmura, drew 4 walks in 5 times at bat. Felix, Houston represen­tative of Postmaster General Farley, allowed the Chester only 9 hits. Due to errors by members of both teams, the game was slow, consuming nearly 3 hours of playing time. Allowing but six hits, in his first start of the ScoFor Group ' B' Baseball battle, " Sinker" Shaw set down the Indianap­olis Nine last Thursday to the tune of 4 - 2. The victory marked the se­cond straight win over ScoFor op­ponents for the Houston team.