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The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27
Page 3
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27 - Page 3. April 27, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/883/show/881.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (April 27, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27 - Page 3. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/883/show/881

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27 - Page 3, April 27, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/883/show/881.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circlation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date April 27, 1938
Description Volume VI, Number 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 3
File name _0575_R.pdf
Transcript THE BLUE BONNET ------------ 3 Due to the forces out of control of the people concerned it hap­pened that the BLUE BONNET was not published on the regular day of publication, and so it is that it comes out at this time. Took notice that Drake and Ramella, of C and S divisions are back from the Relief. Glad to see these lads back aboard and must say that change of diet doesn't do a fel­low any harm. They've both been eat­ing like starved rabbits since their re­turn. Drake was on the Relief for treatment and Ramella took the sure cure for appendicitis. Some of the lads found it quite hard to keep their seats on the quarterdeck the other night just be­fore movies. Could it have had any­thing to do with the Happy Hour that was going on for a few minutes on the Pensacola, then alongside? Seems that the Chief Jimmy- Legs took care of the disturbance in efficient manner and promptly to. Sure is too bad when a first class with eighteen years in the Navy has a bunk that smells like a Chinese barber shop - but take my word for it, I saw and smelled the bunk in which Barricklo, Baker 1c, spends a lot of his time, the other ev­ening and it smelled as if all the hair tonic in the Ship's Service Store had been dumped into it. Naughty boys, and a twenty- year man, too ! ! Now that Houston of the first division ( exofficio) is in the Sig­nal Gang it fills the vacancy there for awhile. What with a hope for a draft of new sailors aboard on arrival at Long Beach there are quite a few of the lads that are hoping to be moved so they can strike for the rate they have been dreamng about for some time. Take it easy lads, it all counts on twenty. Last Monday evening while they had " blacked the boat" we stood by the rail aft of the number one motor launch and there we saw the water as it furled back from the ship's side in great waves and rollers. It came to our attention that the wa­ter appeared as if afire, and as we watched it, it grew more evident that it did seem almost on fire, and the phosphorus in the water was being broken down by the friction of the passing of the ship. It look- ed as if a continuous ribbon of fire was playing along in the w~ ter as the ship rolled on its way. Boy, won't there be a lot of altxious fellows at the gangway for that first liberty boat. Maybe some of the lads won't be any too anxious to tell all they did or saw but I'll bet they have some good stor­ies of . the way they spent their liber­ties in the Islands. I've got my alibi all ready too. Yap Yap Campbell, one­time big man of the quarterdeck gang, is, as most of you know from hearing him during our stay in Pearl Har­bor, on the Pensacola. During the stay there he made it a point to let us know how well off he was till that Sunday evening we had the fried steaks for chow. and boys, you should have seen his mouth water when one of the ship's cooks showed him one from the distance between the ships. In order to keep Charlie quiet he got one from the galley and tossed it over, and the lad had the misfortune to drop it on deck. Said he was glad to get it though so I guess it was O. K. On quite a few occasions I have seen Chandu, otherwise kuown as W. C. Ridge, our esteemed cartoon­ist, sitting in the crew's washroom writing and drawing, but today ( Tue) he changed to music. Yes Sir! ! Sit­ting there listening to strains of the latest " swing" Chandu attracted a variegated audience of snipes, deck­coolies and shipfitters. I have seen some good acts but that stunt is the final straw. Music in the washroom. Why didn't you buy a radio instead of a phonograph, Chandu? ( Continued on Page 4.) .. I •• High heels, according to Christopher Morley, were invented by a woman who had been kissed on the forehead. Liquid milk contains more actual soljds than turnips, oys­ters, cabbage, pine­apple, asparagus, or celery. • • • • In New York 1,542 train. are handled daily - 300,000 passen­gers are accommodated daily. • • • • The Statue of Liberty stands on a prison, and although it is located in New York Harbor, it is not in New York. • • • • Broadway, New York, is the longest street in the world. It ex­tends from Battery Park to Albany, New York, a distance of 150 miles. • • • • The> sun's rays reaching the earth, are hotter in winter than in summer. • • • • In Arabia, a camel may be seen venting his anger toward his master by violently biting, shaking and trampling one of the man's gar­ments for a few minutes. • • • • The deepest place yet found in any ocean is in the Pacific, off the island of Mindanao, in the Philippines. 35,400 feet-- approximate­ly 6th miles- and is called the Jap­anese well. • • • • Ocean waves have been known to reach a height of 60 feet. Storm waves, 80 to 90 feet. The length of the longest wave recorded was 2,700 feet.. • • • • A body falling from an airplane will attain a speed never greater than 118 miles per hour. * • • * A land mile is 5,280 feet. A nauticle mile is 6,080.20 feet. A fathom is six feet, a cable is 0.1 of a nautical mile, or 608 feet.