Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27
Page 2
File size: 595 KB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27 - Page 2. April 27, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/883/show/880.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (April 27, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/883/show/880

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27 - Page 2, April 27, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/883/show/880.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-27
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circlation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date April 27, 1938
Description Volume VI, Number 4
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
File name _0575_L.pdf
Transcript 2----------- THE BLUE BONNET -: THE BLUE BONNET :- A weekly publication of the ship's com­pany of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Exec­utive Officer. Editor. Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald. Assistant Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston Associate Editor: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SK2c Associate Editor: W. J. Bannen, Sea. Ic Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge Circulation: John Boris. Y3c Printer: R. L. Beckwith, Sea. Ic Indolence- Just Plain Laziness DID you know that Sir Issac Newton stood so low in his class that he was taken out of school and sent to work on a farm? Did you know that the great scientist, Charles Darwin, who wrote " Origin of the Species" failed to master any lan­guage and when he left school his father was informed that the boy was below common standards in intellect? Sir Walter Scott lazily neglected his school work to read quantities of poetry and fiction. Rob­ert Fulton, inventor of the steamboat, stood low in his classes because he couldn't give thought to his studies and also to the subjects that really interested him. Samuel Johnson, He­gel, Byron, James Russel Lowell, Wil­liam Cullen Bryant, Thackeray Glad­stone - all were indolent and failures at school. So was Herbert Spencer. Ibsen did not rise above the lowest grade, in which he could possibly graduate. Curie, who, with his wife, discovered radium, progres­sed so poorly that his parents had to take him out of school and employ a private tutor. There may have been va­rious causes contributing to the fail­ures of these men in their school days; but, the biographers of nearly every one mention indolence as a conspicu­ous characteristic. However, these men eventually made good by hard work and long hours of ceaseless endeavor and by exercising initiative and com­mon sense. ..... The Eternal Triangle .... A man is afraid of a woman, a woman is afraid of a mouse, and a mouse is afraid of a man. Rolling Home ( From Page 1.) flying moor, anc had the lit', erty boats going like flashes to the dock. Pretty soon there wasn't anybody left except me and the skipper. He was getting to the end of his forty winks when I shook him. " Wake up skipper, I got a nice surprise for you." He woke up, shook him­self for a minute, and looked around. Then he turned to me and said, " nice work, my lad, I couldn't have done better myself." * * * * * This isn't very funny nor does it have a moral, however, it does approach the subject that we're head­ing towards Long Beach. There'll be twenty thousand " Barnacle Bills" glad to get back once again where they can smell once again the oil wells, the sulphur water, and last but not least that smell from out of Pedro way. Sure we're all glad to get back. I bet I beat you to the first liberty boat. ....... Officers Being Detached ( From Page 1.) The best wishes of the ship's company go with the departing officers. May they find their new duty to their liking and profit. The following officers are reporting soon to the Houston for du­ty: Lieut. Herbert K. Gates from Nav­al Academy, Annapolis, Md. as Asst. Engineeer Officer about 11 June 1938; Lieut. John A. Holbrook from Sub­marine Base, Pearl Harbor, T. H. a. bout 11 June 1938; Lt. ( jg) William C. Jonson from U. S. S. Saratoga in June 1938 ( aviation); Commander William C. Funk ( MC) from Naval Hospital, Great Lakes, Ill. in July 1938; Lt. Comdr. Thomas J. Kelly from U. S. S. Rigel about 30 April 1938. Lieut. R. M. Peacher from the U. S. S. Tuscaloosa has already reported while we were at Pearl Harbor. To these new officers the ship gives a hearty welcome. 4'" Will Power - the ability to eat ONE salted peanut. Fond Memories ( From Page 1.) you a bit closer to the handiwork of the great Creator. Impressed we were, reminiscently awed we are. The Royal Hawaiian, the Alexander Young Hotel, Lau Yee Chai served as gathering places for some. Here we laughed, recounted stories, glowed warm with the spirit of the islands. We were happy- suffused with good fellowship, and glad that the Island residents liked us. Perhaps you didn't make a tour or go into town. Then you'll remember most: the happy hour; the hula dancers; the smoker; the base­ball games; the handball courts; the swimming pool; " Martha"; movies on the quarterdeck' the land office busi­ness at the soda fountain; white uni­forms; and white chair covers. And through it all you drank deeply of cool, restless air currents; breezes that enervated completely without con­scious effort. A smile on every face that greeted us.- a vigorous hand­shake for each aloha - these token. of friendship made us feel like visit­ing princes. Where else on this earth could we have felt so much like regal conquerors ? Hawaii gave us all some­thing. Whether it was its grandiose masterpiece of nature or the efful­gence of warm hopitality, or both, it matters not so much. It gave us some­thing to remember, something to be missed, something that tugged a bit at our heart strings in leaving. And so we say, Aloha Oe Hawaii. Fare­well to an island paradise that gave us so much and asked so little in re­turn. ************************** Congratulations . . • . to Seaman Niel Hattemer upon the birth of a four ounce record christ­ened " Martha". The ship now has a lively soul to fill the niche of fame lately occupied by ita own dear Martha, who is lost, strayed, or stolen. The Stork brought the tyke via a music shoppe in Honolulu, bless its soul. Let us all congratulate Our Hero on this blessed event. ( No flowers", says Niel," I get Hay Fever").