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The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-16
Page 2
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-16 - Page 2. April 16, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/878/show/875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (April 16, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-16 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/878/show/875

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-16 - Page 2, April 16, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/878/show/875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-16
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
Date April 16, 1938
Description Volume VI, Number 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
File name _0573_L.pdf
Transcript Page 2 t----------- · r I -: THE BLUE BONNET :- _ i , ,~ A weekly publication of the ship's com- I pany of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain I , G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and _ , Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Exec- , , uti: dit~: i:~~ ut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald. I I Assistant Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston , ­Associate Editor: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SK2c Associate Editor: W. J. Bannen, Sea. Ic , Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge I I Circulation: John Boris, Y3c - Printer: R. L. Beckwith, Sea. Ic I .:.~.-...-....-.._-~~.:. 16 April, 1938. A Tale Of Two Mess Cooks Once upon a time, in a very great and very famous Navy, there were two young and handsome mess cooks. These mess cooks worked side by side in a compartment on the starboard side of a cruiser, and every day at mess gear they served up huge platters of food to the ravenous hordes which descended upon them. Now, one of these mess cooks was a smart young fellow, who knew all the answers and could tell you at once just what the heroine of the latest novel was going to do next, and boy! oh, boy! how the ladies fell for his line. Nearly every evening he got into his dress blues and fared forth to " give the town a treat," and when he was around, the fun was sure to start. The other mess cook was a stupid sort of a lad. As soon as supper was finished, he used to break out a book and read until time for the movies, and every now and then he handed in a training course to his Division Offi­cer. The smart fellow made all man­ner of fun of this poor dolt, because anyone with half an eye could see that there weren't going to be any rates given out for another six months so what was the use of work­ing one's self to the bone for no rea­son at all ? Along about the end of the month, the Executive Officer suddenly told the Division Officer that there was a rate available, and although the officer was surprized, he broke out his record book and looked over the names of the various men in his division. THE BLUE BONNET Easter - Its Origin And Significance In Bavaria, in the Fifteenth cen­tury, Easter was a laughing and play­ful festival and the clergymen told their congregations humorous stories which they had gathered during the year. This quaint custom prevailed un. til Pope Clement X forbade it about 1670. In France, during this same period and later, Easter Monday was the day for great handball tournaments throughout the country. On Easter Monday wives had the right to strike their husbands. In England a man could seize any woman he saw and after lifting her three times could demand either a kiss or a silver sixpence. There were also games, forfeits and penalties and the loser could buy his or her way out only , vith Easter eggs. For centuries the Russians and the Greeks made Easter a day of great sporting events, with elaborate reli­gious parades and ceremonies. The origin of Easter eggs seems to have been lost in remote antiquity but it is believed that the custom grew out of the ancient acceptance of the egg as a symbol of rebirth. Early Christianity revised and a­dopted many of these customs. In Me­dieval times the importance of fix­ing the proper date for Easter was so urgent that great scholars and learned men often crossed Europe to consult with others or examine an­cient records and documents. For the first two centuries Of tlre Christian era it was celebrated by most Eastern Christians on the day of the Jewish Passover, the fourteenth day of the First Jewish month; while the Wes­tern Christians celebrated on the Sun­day following the fourteenth day. In the year of 325 A. D., the Chrstian Alongside the name of the " smart" fellow was a great big blank, but the poor stupid man had a 3.69 behind his name. Now the Division Officer must have been pretty slow too, be­cause he didn't realize what a swell person the first man was, he was just dumb enough to want some man who knew something in his division, and he didn't seem to give a darn whether a fellow could tell a funny story or not. There are a lot of officers just churches met in council at Nicaea, in Asia Minor and ruled in favor of the Western Christian Church, but the present movable Easter date was not officially established until 1582 after the Gregorian Calendar had been ar­ranged by Pope Gregory XIII. Thus, it was decided that Easter, the most important feast date on the church calendar, should be on the First Sunday following the Paschal Full Moon which happened upon or next after the Twenty- first of March, the vernal equinox. If the Paschal Full Moon falle, on a Sunday then Easter is the next Sunday. The Pas­chal Full Moon is the Fourteenth day of the Lunar Month. The Passover according to histor­ians, goes back to the year 1491 B. C. when the Jews were delivered from oppression in the land of Egypt. It was that great historical event just preceeding the exodus from Egypt. The description of it is found in the Bible in the Twelfth chapter of the Book of Exodus. Likewise, St. Matthew describes for us the event of over nineteen centur­ies ago when the thousands of people who flocked to Jerusalem, drawn by some strange and profound power and feeling of excitement, trembled with terror as darkness descended in the afternoon. Dust clouds filled the air and the ground underfoot heaved and shook convulsively and even the Roman soldiers fled with terror. No other day has ever meant or promised so much to mankind. To- morro , he hadow--- o sorrow will have passed and the world will enter once more into the spirit and promise of Easter. The Easter par­ade will go its joyous way, every­one happy in the coming of spring and inspired by the eternal and in­scrutable miracles of God. like that, but whether we like it or not, the second mess cook got the job. This is just a fairy story of course. Somebody told it to me, and I thought you'd like to get a laugh too about the ignorant fellow who is now draw. ing good pay and is now telling the " smart" mess cook to bear a hand and get the java on the table. FLASH - " A" DIVISION WINS IN­TERDIVISION COMPETITION.