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1938-04-16
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1938-04-16 - Page 1. April 16, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/878/show/874.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(April 16, 1938). 1938-04-16 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/878/show/874

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

1938-04-16 - Page 1, April 16, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/878/show/874.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 1938-04-16
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Date April 16, 1938
Description Volume VI, Number 3
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0572_L.pdf
Transcript Volume VI, Number 3. Easter - Its Origin And Significance Easter - the very name brings new faith and hope to a troubled world. Its origin began in the legends and folklore of the so- called pagans. Wil­liam Bede, an English monk, the most eminent scholar of his day and often referred to as " the Father of Eng­lish Learning" provides what seems to be the earliest record of the ori­gin of the name. It began as the Fes­tial of " Ostara", ancient Teutonic god­dess of Spring. Most of the historic Easter customs can be traced to the early races and tribes of Indo- European origin. They gathered to celebrate the beginning of new life, the budding of the trees, the awakening of flowers, the passing of winter, and the coming of spring. There were tournaments and games and a holiday spirit prevailed into the night when huge bonfires were burned and often an effigy of winter was thrown into the flames amid much rejoicing, while the ancient Greeks and Romans gathered at the time of the vernal equinox to rejoice and cele­brate their belief in the resurrection of " Attis", the God of Vegetation. ( Continued on pag~ 2.) Pearl Harbor, T. H. Hawaiian Hula On The Quarter Deck Hawaii in the moonlight!!! Bare feet on the teak ! ! ! Music over a hatch! ! Last Tuesday night the Bray troupe of Hawaiian entertainers came a­board at seven thirty and gave us one of the most interesting and enter­taining shows it has ever been our privilege to witness on board a ship. Under the ample lighting facilities af­forded by several spot lights every one got to see the transition and de­velopement of the hula from the days before Kamehameha and the mission­aries, through the advent and addi­tion of musical instruments in Hawa­ii to it, up to the present ultra mod­ern hula dancing. In between numbers that unbeatable quartette of mountaineer singers from the Ozarks gave us their interpreta­tion of " The Martins and McCoys". Even the performers were impressed. Then the Hawaiians swung into some fast and humorous versions of the hu­la and we were impressed! One dance by a petite Hawaiian lass was performed mostly for the bene­fit of one, namely Worthington of the shipfitters. A red beet would have seemed wan and pale compared with the fiery red which suffused his face, but it gave everyone a big laugh. The best act came when the dancers went out among the audience to se­lect men as hula partners. Hill, col­ored messboy, was the first to suc­cumb to the charms of one of the dancers, and he " hula'd" bravely, un­consciously putting a few jig steps in the dance. ( Continued on pag~ 4.) 16 April, 1938. Interesting Facts Concerning Hawaii Honolulu is the largest city in the world - because Palmyra Islets, 950 miles south are a part of the City of Honolulu. Kawaiaohao Church -' Westminster Abbey of Hawaii' - is constructed of coral blocks hewn from the reef on the outskirts of the harbor. Captain Cook named the islands " Sandwich Islands", in honor of the Earl of Sandwich, head of the Brit­ish Admiralty in 1779. Later the group was named the " Hawaiian Islands" after the largest island of the group, Hawaii. Kamehameha I conquered the Is­land of Hawaii as the result of local wars. In 1790 he conquered Maui, the 2nd largest island of the group, and in 1795 journeyed to the Island of Oahu with a number of canoes to invade it. He became then the ruler of the three largest islands, and by establishing such a great moral ascendency over them the island of Kauai was later peaceably ceded to him. He is called the " Napoleon of the Pacific", and deeds of the great ruler have been recorded in song and story. There is not a snake or poisonous reptile in the islands. Visitors can go anywhere in the territory without fear of deadly reptiles of any kind. The bite of the centipede, while about as pain­ful as a bee- sting, is not dangerous. Near Honolulu torch fishing is done on the reef of the Ala Moana road, Waikiki, and off the shore at the Waialae district.