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The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08
Page 4
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08 - Page 4. January 8, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/819/show/818.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (January 8, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/819/show/818

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08 - Page 4, January 8, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/819/show/818.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Boris, John, circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date January 8, 1938
Description Volume V, Number 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0532_L.pdf
Transcript Page 4 IN THE OLD NAVY THE BLUE BONNET U. S. S. Houston- 1- 7- 37- 900. NAUTICAL WORDS AND AVAL EXPRESSIONS " IT'S VERY odd that sailormen should talk so very queer." - Ingoldsby Legends. Caulk, To Take A- To take a sleep or nap; came from the days when it was taken on the deck, and one's back became marked by the pitch of the seams. Charlie Noble- Sailor's nautical name for the galley smoke- pipe. Derived from the British merchant service Captain Charlie Noble, who required a high polish on the galley funnel. The funnel of his galley was of copper and its brightness became known in all ports visited. The Old Salt spat at a passing cat, and borrowed a match from me, Then scratched a light where his pants were tight and spake quite fHventIy: " I'll swear, by gum, that it strikes me dumb, this kind of a navee With not a sail, not even a brail, and dog watches drinking tea. ' Twas some years back that I took a crack at serv­ing Uncle Sam; And ' tain't the same, ' cept maybe the name, as ' twas in them days, by damn! We went aloft if the Old Man coughed or if it began to blow; And got a root from the government boot if maybe we went too slow. A trick at the wheel took an arm 0' steel, and lots 0' beef, y'see, But now it's did by a high school kid and patent electricitee. We got our rum an' slap 0' slum ' most every day or so, And mouldy bits 0' ship's biskits if stores were ron­ning low. Today I seed how these youngsters feed- the mess what they got each day, An' strike me pink if I didn't think I'd went to a swell cafe. They give ' em ham an' a lot 0' jam, an' butter an' toast an' pie; An' serve ' em prunes with officers' spoons now scuttle me if I lie! It's kind 0' strange, this turrible change what's come to an honest trade: They print the log, an' instead 0' grog drink sody an' lemonade. An' tell me true, like I'm telling you, they wash ' most every day Which only shows how a sailor goes clear mad for a little pay. It used to be that a man at sea was a sailor. It makes me bile To see the way they cruise today, with radioms, gas and'ile. An' not content to remain in sight, on top where a ship should sail They go an' man a sheet iron can an' dive like a blasted whale. They think they are smart but fruzzle my heart an' shiver my timbers too, If under sea's any pace to be for a self- respectin' crew." The Old Salt spat and donned his hat and hitched those pants of his. He'd had his say, so he creaked away, all stitches and rheumatiz, For sailor- men, since the Flood began, and Noah put to sea, Have raised the pliant, " Oh, the Navy ain't what the Navy used to be!" Cutting a Dido--- A ra­ther recent expression r.. nd one used consider­ably in some sections l- y shorefolk. H. M. S. Dido, a very smart and clean ship in commis­sion about thirty years ago in the British Fleet. The Dido crui sed a­round the fleet often as a " show off" before anchoring, hence " to cut a dido." Show A Leg- An ex­pression used generally by boatswain's mates and master- at- arms to arouse and turn out sleeping men. " Rouse and shine" has been corrupted to " rise and shine" in the American Navy. The call " show a leg" is derived from the days when women were car­ried at sea, " the wives of seamen," the women who put out a purser's stockinged leg for iden­tification were not re­quired to turn out at first call. To Catch a Crab- To fail to keep in stroke in rowing and often times thereby to jam and foul other oars. The Vene­tians call a green hand cr novice at rowing a " crab." Devil to Pay-" The de­vil to pay and only half a bucket of pitch" was the original expres­sion. This is understood when it is known that I TERESTING FACTS OF THE OLD NAVY ( Continued from Palre 1.) rigging of the ship. At first I offered them money. ' Oh,' said they, ' give us grog, what good will money do us here?' Then I told them I would pay my footing in their own way, if they would get permission from the first lieutenant ... I thought this would stagger them, but was mistaken. ' Poh! Poh!' they replied, ' never mind the first lieutenant, send it up by a boy and call it water.' More than two years afterwards, I asked the captain of the top if I didn't owe him a glass of grog. ' Yes Sir, I believe you do, Sir. Why, Sir, I believe it's to pay your footing in the main top, Sir.' " TATTOOING One evidence of the change in sail­ormen lS the disappearance of tattoo­ing or skin decoration. Time was when every seaman looked like a walking picture book. Some of them had the name of every port at which they had visited tatooed upon their bodies. It was the inveterate custom, practically bordering on tradition, of sailors to acquire as many tattoo marks as prin­cipal seaports visited by them on their cruises. Geisha girls, ships and even religious pictures were used in this rather unique method of body adornment which has its origin in the days of cave men and still practiced by uncivilized tribes of the South Sea Islands and other lands. Tattooing is " out" in the modern navy. the " devil" was the longest and most difficult seam to pay and was found near the garboard strake; hence, " be­tween the devil and the deep blue sea." " Pay" is from the French word poix, meaning pitch, " to pay the seams" or to " pitch the seams."