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The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08
Page 2
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08 - Page 2. January 8, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/819/show/816.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (January 8, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/819/show/816

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08 - Page 2, January 8, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/819/show/816.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-01-08
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Boris, John, circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date January 8, 1938
Description Volume V, Number 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 1
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
File name _0531_L.pdf
Transcript Page 2 -: THE BLUE BONNET :- A weekly publication of the ship's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Executive Officer. Editor, Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald, U. S. N. Assistant Editor: R. C. Ball, Ch. Pay Clerk Associate Editors: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SK2c R. B. Thompson, SK3c Circulation: John Boris, Y3c 8 January 1938 -( EDITORIAL )- O NCE again the staff of the BLUE BONNET offers to its readers a distinctively novel edition. " Those days" might have been the " good old days," but we feel sure that everyone aboard much prefers living in the mod­ern navy with its comparative com­forts, in relative safety from the haz­ards of the sea and the long cruises of the yesteryear. We ewe our present customs, our nautical terms, our uniform, and our modern naval ships and devices to those navies of other days. The evolu­tion or creation of them all was very gradual, coming to us finally only after many lives had been lost, hard­ships endured, or wise experimenting done by " the iron men who sailed the wooden ships." Yes, they were iron men in the old navy. They demonstrated this in the face of battle--" As the two ships lay alongside ( the U. S. S. Lackawanna and the Rebel Ram Tennessee), a few of the enemy were seen through the ports, who, using most appropious lan­guage, our marines opened upon them with muskets; even a spittoon and a holystone were thrown at them from our deck, which drove them away." But the navy is just as courageous to­day. This was amply proved only a few days ago when the United States Gunboat PANAY was attacked by an overwhelming horde of Japanese bombing planes. In spite of the knowl­edge that their ship was doomed and sinking under their feet the Captain, officers and crew of the PANA Y fought back with the inadequate weap­ons they had, and it was only after it would have been suicidal to remain with the ship did they leave. THE BLUE BONNET THEFT OF THE " GENERAL" ( Continued from Page 1.) for a few minutes for breakfast no one noticed that twenty men got out on the side away from the station and uncoupled the passenger cars from the locomotive and the three freight cars. Immediately Andrews and his engineer, Knight, climbed into the cab of the engine while the men climbed into the cars and then in full sight of 3,000 Confederate soldiers steamed away before the surprised train crew realized what had happened. The wild ride had just begun. As there was no telegraph office at Big Shanty, Andrews knew he could cut the wires on both sides of Marietta before anyone there was aware of his plans. After passing Allatoona they again tore up a stretch of track and cut the telegraph wires as they had at Marietta. When he reached Kingston, Andrews was ahead of schedule and had to wait on a siding until a freight train had passed. To a curious stationmaster he made the quick explanation " Gen­eral Beauregard is in desperate straits for powder. My train must get through to Ch: 1. ttanooga headquarters imme­diately!" The innocent stationmaster let them through and they continued toward Chattanooga with all wires cut behind them. However they had not reckon~ d with Fuller, the General's conductor, who immedately set out in pursuit of them from Big Shanty- at a dead run on foot! He obtained a handcar at Etowah only two miles from Big Shanty and found the loco­motive " Yonah" at Marietta. With the General's engineer who had arrived by a roundabout route on horseback he started in pursuit of Andrews and the. stolen " General." However he could not react. Kingston due to the freight train that had held up Andrews for a short time. The extraordinary con­ductor therefore set out on foot again and ran two miles to the junction of the Rome railroad where he knew he would find another engine. When Ful­ler again started in pursuit he was only four minutes behind the General. Though unaware of pursuit Andrews pushed his train to the limit and only stopped once to tear up a stretch of track. While doing this the sound of Fuller's whistle was heard and full speed was made toward the objective. At Adairsville another freight was on the siding which Andrews encouraged to proceed to Kingston. Fuller, undaunted upon reaching the torn up stretch of track, again took up the chase on foot and stopping the Adairsville freight proceeded to uncouple the engine and continue the chase backwards. Meanwhile as An­drews reached Calhoun his unsched­uled train was switched into a siding to make way for a passenger train that was just leaving. Repeating his story of earlier, that Beauregard was in desperate need of his powder, he demanded the right of way and quail­ed the other train crew with his pistol and raced for the Oostanaula bridge only six miles away. Just then Fuller reached Calhoun and only stopping long enough to pick up a few soldiers followed hot on Andrew's heels. Two and a half miles from Calhoun An­drews stopped to tear up a rail, but hearing the " Texas" whistle only bent it across the track. The Texas came flying on and could not stop, but the weight of the engine pressed the soft iron of the rail back into place and the locomotive bridged the gap! Seeing this miracle Andrews reversed his engine and hurled one of his freight cars at the oncoming Rebel train. Stopping in time, the Rebels managed to couple the car ahead of the engine and again pursue the Gen­eral. As they neared the first Chicka­mauga bridge often in sight of each other the Yankees set fire to the last car and uncoupled it on the covered bridge. Too late however for the Tex­as reached the span before it caught fire and pushed the blazing car onto a siding at Ringgold and also gave the alarm to the local militia. Fuel running low, the General fal­tered and Andrews tried one last des­perate trick by setting his engine in reverse and heading for the oncoming Texas but it was too late and An­drews' gallant attempt was at an end. Confederates descended upon them from all sides and every man was cap­tured. Andrews and seven of his men were later executed by the Rebels at Atlanta prison. Eight succeeded in es­caping and the remaining six were ex­changed for Confederate prisoners. Today the doughty old " General" still stands at the Chattanooga sta­tion, Andrews' goal, for all to see.