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The Blue Bonnet 1937-12-04
Page 3
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-12-04 - Page 3. December 4, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 1, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/799/show/797.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (December 4, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-12-04 - Page 3. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/799/show/797

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-12-04 - Page 3, December 4, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 1, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/799/show/797.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-12-04
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Boris, John, circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date December 4, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number 47
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 3
File Name _0519_R.pdf
Transcript THE BLUE BON ET Page 3 Last week's issue has received quite a bit of comment, this mostly due to the " Orders of the Day" which seems to have pleased all who have read it. Greetings shipmates and congratula­tions to those men who have advanced another step in their ratings. The ship's company surely appreciates the cigars that are so willingly distributed by those who are so proudly wearing their new rates. J. L. Moore, " A" Division mess cook, recently left a letter to one of his fair sex friends around the compartment and it was read by all hands. Seems he invited himself to the girl friend's home for dinner and requested that he be allowed to prepare it. We don't know if she took him up on his culin­ary arts. SEND the BLUE BONNET to the folks at home. Life In Our avy A brief glance at the history of em­ployment of hospital ships during the past 75 years will reveal Hospital that no first class nation Ships will carryon a major war without employing hospi­tal ships to serve the fleet. The United States avy's floating hospital, U. S. S. RELIEF, only hospital ship attached to the fleet, takes care of the sick and injured personnel of the ships of the navy. The RELIEF, placed in commis­sion on 28 December 1920, is the first ship of any navy in the world to be built a a hospital ship, is named after the first RELIEF, a converted ve sel which served as a hospital ship dur­ing the Spanish- American War, ' he Philippine Insurrection and the hin­ese Boxer uprising. The present RE­LIEF is 483 feet long, 60 feet wide, has a di placement of 9,800 ton , cruis­ing radius of 15,000 mil s. Though smaller than the average hospital a­shore, it is equipped to handle 360 cases and 500 cases in an emergency. This is more than the average hospi­tal can handle. No less than ten medi­cal officers, three dental officers, twelve nurses and 118 men of the ho pital corps who act as technical assistants minister to 2200 patients each year. About six new patients are received aboard the RELIEF each day for treatment of everything from broken legs, colds, burns and aching teeth to serious diseases. One or more surgical operations are performed every day. 417 majors and 566 minor operations were performed last year. Only 3 out of 1000 die, while 20.5 percent are transferred to shore hospitals and 70.72 percent recover within 21 days. The RELIEF has the most modern equipment that is obtainable and is ranked with the leading hospital of the country. ~ " I am satisfied on one thing at last; I found where my husband spends his evenings," remarked Mrs. Gadabout. " You don't say so, dear; how did you find out?" questioned the excited Mrs. Gossip. " I stayed at home one evening last week and found him there," answered the satisfied lady. * * * * * * * * * * * * Everything is going along smoothly regarding the inspection of the ship. Credit is given to all those who are really bearing down and getting all those little details. A man in an insane asylum sat fish­ing over a flower bed. A visitor wish­ing to be friendly walked up and said: " How many have you caught?" " You're the ninth," replied the nut. A request for information concerning the definition of " stick happy" is de­sired. Seems the musicians use this term quite a bit. * * * * With only a few more weeks left be-fore Christmas is here again quite a number of men are lost as to what they should give their one and only. Heard some wish to give watches away but postcards are much cheaper. -- 0--- At a dinner not long ago, the man sitting next to the lady was, to say the least, inebriated. He leered at her and commented, " Shay, you're the homliest woman I've ever seen." With a show of spirit she replied, " Well, and you're the drunkest man I've ever seen." " Yeah, but I'll get over that in the morning. One of our MM2c's ( wearing two hash marks) while out dining with his wife, kept joking about his being under 21 years. Upon placing his order he had a hard time convincing the waitress he was of age. That's the penalty of having blond wavy hair, blue eyes and dimples. * * * * " Don Juan" Rushworth claims that he is one of the finest dancers who ever glided over the Majestic dance floor. Doesn't even have to buy tickets as the girls come over to him requesting dances. Then we have another concerning a dashing mess cook who tried playing around with two girl friends. They both came out to the ship and asked to see him. He had one on the Main Deck Aft and the other in the No. 1 Messing Compartment. When it was time to set up mess he was too tired due to his having to run forward and aft all afternoon. * * * * * * * * * * * * Boris of the Log Room, better known to the Engineer's Force as " Little Napoleon," was surely trying hard to convince the girls in the local cafes how important he is to the ship. Most of the girls, though, have more time with navy men than he has. * * * * Have you noticed that the women in Long Beach won't sit next to a sailor in a bus and yet when the bus is filled they always go alongside a seated sailor knowing that he will get up and give his seat to her. It never fails. * * * * The following FLASH was received from the contribution box: ... What Storekeeper from Arkansas, while a­courting his present wife, carried a hog- leg for protection against those big bad boys up in them thaI' Holly­wood Hills?