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The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 3. November 13, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/782.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (November 13, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 3. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/782

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 3, November 13, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/782.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Boris, John, circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date November 13, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number 44
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 3
File name _0510_R.pdf
Transcript One Hundred And Sixty- two Years Of Faithful Service ( From Page 1.) SINCE the date of organization of the United States Marines have served their country with distinction and valor, and their well trained forces, both at sea and on land, hold a bril­liant record in the annals of American history. During the Revolution, one battalion formed a large part of the reinforcements sent to General Wash­ington after his disastrous retreat a­cross New Jersey, and was with him at the Battle of Princeton and Tren­ton. The other battalion served with the ships of the navy and had their part in the victories of Barry, Biddle, and John Paul Jones. Following the Revolution, marines fought in the naval war with France, against the Mediterranean pirates of Tripoli and the Barbary States, in the War of 1812, in the Mexican War, in the Civil War, against the West In­dian pirates, against the Chinese, J an­anese, and Koreans, against the canni­bals of the South Sea Islands, against several tribes of American Indians, and landed to protect American life and property in every quarter of the globe on occasions too numerous to mention. Since the Spanish- American War, in 1898, marines have been called upon to serve on foreign soil in protection of American life and property dur­ing every year. In 1899 they were in action in the Philippine insurrection and also in the same year landed in Samoa to protect Americans during the native uprising. In 1900 one bri­gade was kept busy in the Philippines while another formed a part of the Peking relief column of the Chinese Boxer Rebellion and a third force was landed at Panama. In 1901 and 1902 marines saw action in a new Philip­pine uprising in the island of Samar, while another marine force was again landed at Panama. In 1903 marines were lan" ded in San­to Domingo and Korea, while a force was sent to Abyssinia to help nego­tiate a treaty with King Menelik. In 1903 and 1904 marines served on the I~ thmus of Panama during the forma­tIon of the Republic of Panama. In 1905 and 1906 expeditions were sent to Cuba, remaining there until 1909 as a part of the army of Cuban pacifi- THE BLUE BONNET cation. In 1907 marines landed follow­ing an uprising in Honduras and were also sent to assist survivors of the Ja­maica earthquake. In 1909, 1910, and 1912 forces were landed in Nicaragua, putting an end to the revolution and disorder and restoring the country to a stable ba­sis. In 1911 and 1912, marines oper­ated in China to protect American life and property following the overthrow of the Manchu dynasty. In 1917 the United States entered the war with Germany and the Marine Corps sent the Fourth Brigade to France as a part of the American con­tingent. The brigades won distinction as a part of the Second Division which stopped the German advance on Pari:; at Belleau Wood in the Chateau Thier­ry sect'll' in June, 1918. Later, it took part in the actions of Soissons, St. Mihiel, Champaigne, and Meuse- Ar­gonne. The Fourth Brigade was com­posed of the Fifth and Sixth Marir. e Regiments and the Sixth Machine Gun Battalion, numbering altogether 258 officers and 8,211 enlisted men. Marines may be landed on foreign soil without declaration of war and without implications of the existence of a state of hostilities. In this capa­city marines have seen a large share of their foreign service in the protec­tion of American life and property during disorder and trouble in for­eign countries. It was in this capacity that marines went to Santo Domingo, Haiti, Nicaragua, and on several oc­casions, to China. During the present Sino- Japanese controversy the Fourth and Sixth Marine Regiments are ac­tively engaged in protecting Ameri­can interests in Shanghai. The development of the science of modern warfare emphasizes the fact that a fleet without an accompanying land force is robbed of vital elements of its tactical strength, both as a weapon of attack and safe- guarding its own security. In view of this fact, marines undergo thorough training in connection with landing operations, and once each year the Fleet Marine Force holds landing drills with the fleet. With this mobile force of mar­ines to form a nucleus, the navy is working to perfect a landing force second to none, its object to facilitate the capture and holding of land posi­tions. On November 10, the Marine Corps Page 3 Little Ocko Says Emil Drake, Sea1c, has been chris­tened in the name of Cassanova, the great lover, by his fellow members of the signal gang. That's all right Emil, we're all for you and that's plenty, though a little more retirement would be in order. " Shanny" O'Niell, sails striker, says Willie Burke, First Division seaman, is a rat. It seems Shanny and Jack Barron ( another fo'cas'tle flash) mis­treated one of Burke's pieces of cor­respondence. Willie managed to get even with a real venegeance. How's to put on a pot of jamoke, Shanny? " Shirley" Steele, SC3c, received a honey of a shiner on the right eye last Sunday morning. Got it wrest­ling a quarter of beef in the ice box and it threw him for a loss. Seemed to be more of an asset than anything else last Wednesday evening tho! The boy turns up in Bachelor's Club ' Clark Gable- ing' a strip tease dancer. Little Ocko says Shirley must still have what it takes! Sure is good to see C. B. Webb, Bkr second class, back in the bake shop. Buford has always been a favorite baker on the Rambler Ship and all hands welcome him home. We hope you stay, Pal! Sure must be nice to be Chief Sher­iff. That fellow really rates in places like the Galley or anywhere else any­thing good to eat holds out. Little Ocko says he's a good, honest sheriff though, and that goes to make any good ship better. There goes liberty calL See you next week fellows. Little Ocko says So Long! -- 0- " How do you know Private Jones was drunk when he came in last night?" " He crawled up to the gate on hi hands and knees, with a bottle of li­quor tied around his nzck, and tried to make me believe he was a St. Ber­nard dog looking for a blizzard!" celebrated its 162nd anniversary- 162 years of faithful service, and tradi­tion shows that our motto " SEMPER FIDELIS" has never been dishonored.