Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13
Page 2
File size: 634 KB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 2. November 13, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/781.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (November 13, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/781

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 2, November 13, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/781.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Boris, John, circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date November 13, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number 44
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0510_L.pdf
Transcript Page 2 -: THE BLUE BONNET :- A weekly publication of the 8hip's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Executive Officer. Editor, Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald Assistant Editor: R. C. Ball, Ch. Pay Clerk Associate Editors: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SK2c R. B. Thompson, Seale Clrcul8tion: John Borl8, F2c 13 November 1937 Fairy Tale Of The Week Once upon a time there was a mar­ine sergeant who was unduly possess­ed with a suppressed desire. He had an unsatiable curosity as to what was behind closed doors. After imbibing . too freely of various and sundry brands of " giggle- water," he found that he must go to the arms of Morpheus in order to regain his equilibrium. Now, it happened that the ~ aid sergeant ( tall, blond and handsome (? » was also an addict of somnambulism- sleep- walking to you. In the wee small hours of the morn­ing, somnambulism took control with the result that every family in one of Long Beach's swellest apartment hous­es was rudel~ awakened by the ring­ing of their door bells. Upon investi­gation and finding such a situation in the hands of a marine, the irate ten­ants decided that reenforcements were required. Shortly, there appeared the Nemisis of all erring somnambulists, also dressed in blue and with brass buttons riding in a siren- equipped lim­ousine- in short- the " BLACK MAR­IA"- and our HERO was hospitably invited to a ride. MORAL: CRIME DOESN'T PAYl ( Ask " Baby Face" Nelson.) --- 0- " How's your new girl?" " Not so good." " You always were lucky." E+ The negro and the salty seaman were engaged in the pastime of fisticuffs. But the show was growing boring for the negro, so he pulled out his razor and made a pass at our friend the sea­man. " Humph," said the seaman. " You never touched me." " Maybe not, white boy," replied the darkey, " but shake your head." THE BLUE BONNET Odd Facts Regarding The Marine Corps " Semper Fidelis," Sousa's march which he dedicated to the U. S. Mar­ines, is the only tune except the Na­tional Anthem which is officially rec­ognized by the United States Gov­ernment. At the beginning of the War of 1812, Captain Wilkinson, Royal Mar­ines, delivered up his sword to Lieu­tenant Thomas R. Swift, U. S. Marines, at Gosport ( Norfolk), Virginia. This was the first surrendered sword of the enemy in that war. The last skirmishes fought by the U. S. Marines in the Philippines were as late as 13 February, 1924, at Soc­orro, Bucas Grande, Province of Leyte, P. I., and lasted to 10 March, 1924. Marines were sent to this is­land at the request of Gov. General Leonard Wood after Philippine con­stabulary failed to subdue the fana­tic colorum tribe, a well organized group of Bolo- men. Private Henry P. Levert, 16th Com­pany, 5th Marines, captured 78 pri­vates and four German officers at Bois De Belleau, France, June 28,1918. Alvin F. Taylor, 5th Marines, while acting as a sniper in the Argonne was treed by a German sniper. Neither could move without exposing himself. They carried on a sniping duel at 600 yards for three hours until the marine got his man. A moment later Taylor was knocked out of the tree by a shell fragment. At the battle of Fort Fisher, 1865, Admiral Robley D. ( Fighting Bob) Evans, then a young naval officer, was wounded. Private Henry Wasmuth J U. SX ., incarrying the future Ad­miral to a place of safety, was mor­tally wounded. Fifty- three years later, Wasmuth's name was honored by naming a destroyer after him. Finger prints are not new to the Marine Corps. As early as 1907 a sys­tem was inaugurated. All personnel having prints taken, forwarded to headquarters, classified and filed as a permanent means of identification. It has been established as a fact that the famous expression " Come on you . . . , do you want to live forever," was yelled by a U. S. Marine sergeant to his men upon starting an attack. Dear Sal, Us lads 0' tha sea have been havin' on tha bosom 0' tha ocean many days 0' late, and we're gettin' so used to a rollin' deck under our sea legs that our bodies are beginnin' to sway in and out with tha tide. Well Sal, I guess all folk are a reachin' their graspin' hands forward to clutch hard cash nowadays as much as they allus have, but save for a lucky few tha lot 0' them will be only takin' clothes off their own backs when they begin to lose tha little they have in tha attempt for riches. There was tha case 0' " Hard Luck" McGill way back when I was still chorin' on tha farm. He had tha dern­dest notions 0' gettin' rich in a short time. I remember one 0' his pet schem­es tolerably well. He built a tight small mesh wire fence ' round 5 acres 0' his place and stocked it with all tha rats he could catch. A lot 0' us lads used to go down and just look at tha rodents as they scampered within tha pen. They sure was a pretty sight tha way they used to play together free from any harm. But not for long did tha rats enjoy their games. Old " Hard Luck" com­menced collectin' a passel 0' cats and dumped tha lot amongst them. And wb. at.... a..- battle. there was. Tha din was heard far and near, but finally tha rats that were left all hunted their holes, and tha cats that had survived took over tha pen. " Hard Luck" said there was a lot 0' cash in a rat and cat farm as a body could sell cat furs for a dime apiece. It was his scheme to let tha cats eat tha rats and so allow them to multiply in numbers. He would kill only tha prime cats, then throw their carcasses back to tha rats who would eat them and also multiply. It was rats eat cats and cats eat rats until cash would flow in to " Hard Luck's" jeans like a roarin' flood. ( Continued on Paa- e 4.)