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The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 1. November 13, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 1, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/780.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (November 13, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/780

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13 - Page 1, November 13, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 1, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/784/show/780.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-11-13
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Boris, John, circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date November 13, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number 44
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0509_L.pdf
Transcript Volume IV, Number 44 Long Beach, California 1.775 United States Marine Corps 13 November 1937 1937 The Navy Goat N OW that the football season has well begun, the avy goat, venerable and traditional mascot of midshipman football team , will be seen in action, parading the side lines robed in blan­ket of blue and gold. The annual West Point - Naval Academy classic could scarcely be played in the absence of the goat. To be sure, his presence can­not insure a Navy victory but, on the other hand, how could a win be even hoped for if he weren't there to bring good luck? The first Navy goat to ap­pear at a West Point - Navy game came from a farm adjoining the play­ing field at West Point in 1890. He got there on account of a hunch of Lt. ( jg) Charles H. Harlow and Ensign F. B. Sullivan. Both of the e officers, seeing so few Navy rooters en route to the game, decided that something had to be done. In this frame of mind they saw a plain old goat in a near­by field. They paid the owner a mall price, and on they went to the game. The Navy won to the tune of 24 to O. Some have said that the price of the goat was one dollar. Anyway, the game having been won, some of the credit was given to the goat mascot. Ever ince then Navy goat has always tried to bring good luck to Navy football teams in the annual classic. A Houston philosopher says that the mo t jealous husband in the world is the fellow who made his wife drink black coffee at bedtime, so she would­n't meet the man of her dreams. One Hundred And Sixty- two Years Of Faithful Service THERE have been marines on ves­sels of every navy in the world since the first galleys of war were built by Solomon. The early Phoenicians and Egyptians carried in addition to their crew of navigators and galley slaves a small body of soldiery used solely for fighting. These sea- going soldiers were a picked lot, outstanding in their loyalty, courage and fierceness in bat­tle when engaged in sea hostilities. But after the fall of Rome, the barbar­ians produced a novelty in naval war­fare in the shape of dragon ships, manned by crews of blue- eyed Vikings who were, in the truest sense, soldiers and sailors too. It was from the e soldier- sailors that the idea of mar­ines was conceived, and down through the ages marines have retained their characteristics as fighting men- mus­keteers, sharpshooters and well disci­plined forces furnishing spear heads for boarding and landing forces. As the first great modern maritime power, Great Britain organized the first modern Marine Corps in 1664, and in 1740, two regiments of mar­ines were recruited from the Ameri­can colonies for service with the Bri­tish Navy. On November 10, 1775, the Contin­ental Congress authorized organiza­tion of two battalions of marines which were the first United States Marines. From these our Marine Corps of today is descended. ( Continued on Page 4.) The Navy " Gunboat" " THEN, in 1861, an engineer by the name of aptain Eads contracted to construct seven river gunboats in six­ty- five days for the Government, he could hardly have imagined that sev­enty- six years later naval construct­ors would be taking almost two years to build such a " simple" thing as a gunboat. What's more, he would have scoffed at the idea that a gunboat could ever be looked upon as a " small, but formidable cruiser." In spite of Captain Ead's possible disbelief, the United States Navy has today in the U. S. S. ERIE and her sister ship, the U. S. S. CHARLES­TON, gunboats which are not only " small but formidable cruisers," but are eminently capable of performing convoy, patrol, scouting, or independ­ent duty. These ships are of an en­tirely new gunboat class, specially de­signed for the Special Service Squad­ron. After the beginning of the war be­tween the States, it was soon discov­ered by the North that for a decisive campaign, control of the Southern waterways would be necessary. The alarming number of river boats being converted into warships by the Con­federates spurred the Union to con­struct its own river fleet and accord­ingly men like Captain Eads were giv­en special rush orders. Modern gunboat service extends from the rivers of China with their profer, sional and amateur pirates to the waters of our southern neighbors ( Continued on Page 4.)