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The Blue Bonnet 1937-10-23
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-10-23 - Page 1. October 23, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/769/show/765.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (October 23, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-10-23 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/769/show/765

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-10-23 - Page 1, October 23, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/769/show/765.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-10-23
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Boris, John, circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date October 23, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number 41
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0500_L.pdf
Transcript Volume IV, [ umber 41 * .- 5.5... 0 .. 5-.- 0.. * Long Beach, California 23 October 1937 NAVAL CUSTOMS An English admiral is credited with the following reason for the use of the words " starboard" and " port." He states that the English sailors adopt­ed these expressions from the Portu­gese Tagus River pilots. The pilot used to stand to leeward to see under the belly of the sail, and whe, n he wanted the helm over to his side of the ship he gave the order, " Esta borda," ( this way), and when he wanted it up to windward, he would say, " Porto." Not too much credence can be placed upon this explanation, for there must have been some con­nection between the words " starboard" and " larboard." In 1846 this latter term was eliminated from the vocabu­lary of the United States Navy be­cause of the danger of misunderstand­ing due to the similarity of these words. The right- hand side of a vessel, fac­ing forward. In ancient times, when ships were small, a steering rudder or steering oar called the " steerboard" was located on the right- hand side of the ship in its after section. The posi­tion of the steerboard, always located on that particular sid; e, gradually came to denote that side of the ship, and through usage, became " star­board." ., . The only red, white and blue mark­ed buoy in the world is in Baltimore Harbor just off Fort McHenry. It marks the spot where Francis Scott Key wrote the words to our National Anthem, the Star Spangled Banner. Et- Navy Bill Opines: A man wrapped up in himself makes a small package. THE SHIP'S MENAGERIE Rear Admiral Reginald R. Belknap, U. S. Navy, retired, wrote the follow­ing for " The Lookout." How many can you identify? " When Noah put the Ark out of com­mission, he was not accountable to anybody for getting the animals a­shore and so, evidently, some of them stayed behind long enough to leave their marks on board, some of which have come down to this day. " There are dogs all over the ship, ducks in the sail room, a cathead on each bow, many a gooseneck about, and a swallow in every block. The peli­can hook keeps out of the crow's nest but is usually the better for a little mousing around. The little colt, or short rope's end which every captain of a top carried in his cap, handy for assisting the lagging top- men up the rigging grew up into a Flemish horse, which took his meals in the manger, so- called because near the hawse, a­longside the jackasses, in the cool breeze coming through the bridle port, and supported the weather earing man after he had used the footropes in the stirrups to get out to the cockscomb. The cat fish used to get the anchor in, and a crane now gets the boats out. Sword belts and some uniform coats have frogs, the backstays are snaked down for action, and the shrouds have ratlines. Wireless has introduced a rattail and a squirrel cage. A bull ring and bull rope are ready and wait­ing, but we only have the bull's eyes and his tobacco. Possibly he was kept away by the wildcat and lioness which used to hang out around the capstan where she left her whelps. Neither ( Continued on Page 4.) THE VALUE OF DISCIPLINE Dispute rages these days as to the value of discipline. The birch rod stands neglected in the school room corner. Parents take a lot of punish­ment from their offspring, lest grow­ing egos be untimely nipped, and the young idea wants to argue every case as it comes up. We've always believed in discipline. Not only the discipline of obedience, but that discipline of automatically doing one's duty at command- whe­ther that command comes from inner conscience or outer compulsion. A re­cent event has argued our theory well. You recall the circumstances the night the exploding Hindenberg plum­meted from the skies at the Lake­hurst Naval Air Station. Sailors and civilians of the ground crew ran from under the burning hulk for their lives. They ran, but as they ran there rang through the tragic night the voice of Chief Boatswain's Mate Frederick J. Tobin: " Navy men stand fast." Such is the power of discipline that one man's voice ringing out in the hor­rified dark stopped and turned the ground crew as a man. Through the flames playing along the crumpled Hindenberg's frame, Chief Tobin led them back. " Navy men stand fast." When it was over, they were blister­ed and burned. But they had heard their duty and, being disciplined men, had done it. . II. It has been estimated that the power of the U. S. S SARATOGA'S motors on a full power trial is sufficient to move the Empire State building down Fifth Avenue at forty miles per bour.