Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Blue Bonnet 1937-09-24
Page 1
File size: 581 KB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-09-24 - Page 1. September 24, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/754/show/750.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor. (September 24, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-09-24 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/754/show/750

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor; Thompson, R. B., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-09-24 - Page 1, September 24, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/754/show/750.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-09-24
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan Jr., associate editor
  • Thompson, R. B., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Smith, G. A., printer
  • Meckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
Date September 24, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number 39
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0491_L.pdf
Transcript Volume IV, Number 39 * " S. 5... 0 .. 5-.- 0.. * Navy Yard, Mare Island- Vallejo, California 24 September 1937 Baseball Nine Drops Richmond 16 To 13 With the baseball season rolling in­to its final stages of the year, the Houston baseball nine nosed out a fighting Richmond team by the score of 16 to 13. Even though the large score would indicate an uninteresting game, but on the contrary its was well played and very exciting. Salmon pitched the full nine innings and ex­cept for spots of wildness had the opposing batters swinging wildly. Twelve Richmondites went down swinging and Salmon issued 8 bases on balls besides hitting one, Hattemer, Rebert and Salmon hit for the cir­cuit, accounting for six of the Tuns. In the fifth inning Gryskiewicz was put out of the game for unnecessary roughness on sliding into home and Wright took his place at third with Felix moving into centerfield. The Houston team rolled up a total of 15 base hits with Phillips, Hattemer, Jasinski and Rebert leading the way. It seems a shame that the season must end now when the team has finally hit its stride. But outside of only one or two more games the Houston baseball season IS about over. A CALL TO ARMS Monday evening at 7: 15 a call will be issued for all men who are inter­ested in trying out for the ship's bas­ketball team. All men who played last year, and anyone at all who likes the game come out at 7: 15 Monday evening. With the cruisers basketball season coming up, we expect to be one of the top teams, so let's all who know this game come out and join in the fun. Right On The Bell In a small, round observatory at Mare Island, California, there is locat­ed a Transit, several very expensive temperature- controlled, carefully- reg­ulated clocks, and a radio apparatus for broadcasting time signals. The clocks are kept in a sealed room and carefully regulated by means of an electro- magnet, whose lines of force act on the pendulum, to speed it or slow it a thousandth of a second or so. Every night observations are taken on stars to determine the clock's er­rors. Some time ago the sky grew over­cast and the observatory was unable to obtain the necessary data for regu­lation of the clocks. Night after night passed without an opportunity to get transits of the stars. The officer in charge, retired from the service and a noted astronomer, grew worried as time passed; he could only guess how badly in error were his daily time signals to the fleet. As day followed day wit h ou t an observation, his friends became anxious as well as he, believing the chronometer to be five to ten seconds out. At last one night he received a telephone call in the early hours: the sky was clearing. Hurrying into his clothes, he rushed over to the observatory to make his calculations. Next morning, on being asked by his curious friends how great the time error had been he re­plied quite seriously, " The instru­ments were badly out." And shaking his head, " Our master chronometer had gained seven hundredths of a sec­ond!" Although we don't have to worry about hundredths of a second, or even ( Continued on Page 2.) A Salute By The Frigate " United States" Since the personnel of the U. S. Navy are public servants, their acts have a public nature which brings either cre­dit or discredit upon the nation they serve. Since these acts have a national character, miscarriages may bring about international complications. An incident in Toulon Harbor, France, illustrates how serious may be even an act of carelessness by naval per­sonnel. On 25 April 1834 the frigate United States arrived in Toulon to obtain supplies. The U. S. S. Constellation was already there. A French fleet was also there and a salute of 15 guns was fired to the admiral in command. Salutes in those days were not fired with salut­ing batteries but from the main bat­tery along the gun deck starting with the forward gun on the starboard side and firing single guns alternately star­board and port. Also at that time U. S. men of war were required by the Navy Regula­tions to keep all guns " shotted," or loaded as we would say, while at sea. This was brought about by the unfor­tunate Chesapeake - Leopard affair of twenty- seven years before. On the morning of 1 May, prepara­tions were made to fire a salute in honor of Louis Phil1ipe, King of France. The Captain had left the ship a few days previously to purchase pro­visions in Marseilles. The lieutenant in command ordered Gunner Samuel City to prepare 24 guns, 21 of which were to be fired at noon. The salute went off smoothly until the 18th gun, after which three shot­( Continued on Page 2.)