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The Blue Bonnet 1937-07-16
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-07-16 - Page 1. July 16, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/704/show/700.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. (July 16, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-07-16 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/704/show/700

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-07-16 - Page 1, July 16, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/704/show/700.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-07-16
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Hall, A. D., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Thompson, Robert B., circulation
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, California
Date July 16, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number 29
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 11
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0460_L.pdf
Transcript Volume IV, Number 29 * .. s. s... 0 .. 5-.- 0.. * Navy Yard, Mare Island- Vallejo, California 16 July 1937 " Fog, Rain- and Death" ( With Apologies to Floyd Gibbons.) To get the yarn right from the start we've got to follow the career of a heavy cruiser, the U. S. S. Charleston. Built at Newport News in 1905, and ordered to duty as flagship of the Pa­cific Fleet, she put into New York harbor for provisions before making the trip around the Horn. Being a new vessel many visitors came aboard. One day a little old lady came aboard and asked to see the captain. After explaining that it would be impossible, the Officer of the Deck, out of politeness, asked if there was any message he could deliver. The little old lady wasn't stumped. She had a message, " Please tell the cap­tain," she said, " that the Charleston will be blown up in Magdalena Bay, Mexico, on the eighth day of May, 1908. It will be foggy, rainy and a tramp steamer will come out of no­where and refuse to give any informa­tion about herself." The story got around, and of course it gave the crew a big laugh. Why, there hadn't been a drop of rain in Magdalena Bay sfnce time began. Putting the old lady down as another crackpot they forgot about it. That is, they did until May 1908. The Charleston took up her duties in the Pacific and the spring of 1908 found her at Magdalena Bay for tar­get practice. The prophecy was almost forgotten. But some of the more sup­erstitious on board did remember and on the night of May 7, 1908, after a day of perfect blue, cloudless skies they turned in their hammocks won­dering. ( Continued on Page 4.) Our Captain Leaves It is with a feeling of deep regret and cherished memories of many happy cruises spent together that we bid our commanding officer, Captain Guy E. Baker, a fond farewell and a heartfelt goodbye. During the past two years under his skillful guidance the ship not only ranked as a highly efficient fighting craft of the navy, but was, as we rightly can say, a happy ship. The crew and officers felt as a coordinated team, always justly prideful to point out that they were serving aboard the United States Ship Houston. So it is for this and to the fact that Captain Baker possesses the qualities of a real man that we wish him good speed and good luck in his next assignment where he will report for duty to the Chief of Naval Opera­tions, Washington, D. C. To our new commanding officer, Captain G. N. Barker, coming from duty as Professor of Naval Science and Tactics, R. O. T. C., Harvard Uni­versity, Cambridge, Massachusetts. we extend a hearty welcome. We hope that you will like our ship, and we will do all in our power to make your tour of duty aboard both pleasant and profitable. Full Power Run Successful Highly successful were the Full Power and Smoke Prevention runs made between Astoria, Oregon and the navy yard, Mare Island. To many this may seem to be just another rou­tine problem for the Engineering De­partment. It is, but there is a great ( Continued on Page 2.) United States Savings Bonds Much has been said and many words written on the subject of saving. No doubt spending or saving is habit forming; that is, once a person starts spending or saving there is a tendency to continue at the same. Many methods of systematic sav­ing are tried in the navy. Allotments to a bank are very popular but in a great number of cases it is, " Dear Bank, Please remit," with the request reaching the bank each month about five days before the allotment check has arrived. Another method is the Ship's Bank which has the disadvantage that no money deposited, even in the most extreme emergency, may be with­drawn until discharged. Yet another method has recently been presented by the government in the form of United States Savings Bonds. These Savings Bonds are sold on a discount basis and mature ten years from the date of issue for one third more than their purchase price. Savings Bonds range in purchase price from the $ 18.75 bond which ma­tures at $ 25.00 to the $ 750.00 bond maturing at $ 1,000.00. Bonds may be bought at third class or larger post officies or direct from the Treasurer of the United States. In addition a beneficiary in case of death may be designated on all bonds that are not under co- ownership. Savings Bonds may be redeemed by proper identification, the execution of request for payment on the back of the bond being witnessed by a postmaster or executive officer of any ( Continued on Page 2.)