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The Blue Bonnet 1934-11-03
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Berkley, J. B., editor. The Blue Bonnet 1934-11-03 - Page 1. November 3, 1934. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 26, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/66/show/62.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor. (November 3, 1934). The Blue Bonnet 1934-11-03 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/66/show/62

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor, The Blue Bonnet 1934-11-03 - Page 1, November 3, 1934, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 26, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/66/show/62.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1934-11-03
Creator (Local)
  • Berkley, J. B., editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Harris, D. A.
  • Botterell, R. E.
  • Brown, H. L.
  • Holt, Jack
  • Berg, Gus
  • Post, R. W.
  • Razlaff, T. B.
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Enroute to San Pedro, California
Date November 3, 1934
Description Volume I, Number X
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0042_L.pdf
Transcript Volume I FASHIONS IN NAMES Enroute San Pedro, California HOME AGAIN Number X Oh, B. A. is a man's town, there's power in the air; And Rio is a wonan's town, with flowers in her hair; And Monte is a friendly town as through the streets you roam; But when It comes to living there is no place like home. ' Tis fine to see the southern world, and travel up and down Among the famous palaces and cities of renown; To admire the many places and all the beautious scenes- But now I think I've had enough of southern Spanish things. So, it's home again, and home again, America for me! I want a ship that's northward bound ploughing through the sea To the blessed land of home folks beyond the ocean bars Where the people all speak English and the flag is full of stars. ( With apologies to Henry Van Dyke) - The RANGER. The custom of naming naval vessels during the first forty years of our maritime history is shrouded in ob­scurity.. During the Revolutionary War, the practice was inaugurated of naming the ships after famous sail­ors, or in honor of prominent states­men and military leaders. The prac­tice of naming vessels after states and cities was first introduced in 1776. Two years later the French alliance led to the adoption of names such as, ALLIANCE, QUEEN OF FRANCE, and like names that were popular during that period. The frigates built for the Navy during 1794- 1812 were either named by the builder or by the naval offi­cers supervising their construction. It was not until after the War with Algiers in 1815, that the naming of vessels of the Navy was regulated by statute. The first law was passed by Congress on March 3, 1819, stat­ing that ships of the first class should be named after States of the Union; those of the second · class after rivers, and those of the third class after principal cities and towns; taking care that no two vessels in the Navy shall bear the same name at the same time. Since then, many changes in the statutes regulating the practice of naming naval vessels, have taken place. At the present time, the regul­aations goverI1ing the naming of ves­sels of the Navy follow general rules laid down by the Navy Department in accordance with the resolution a­dopted by Congress on March 3, 1901, These are, that the shills of the first rate should be named for the States of the Union, those of the cruiser Continued on page four TOUR a'ia COOK AT END In just five short days our palatial liner, once used by Presidents as a yacht, will again slide majestically into the home port, the grande fin­ale of our momentous cruise of a million joyeous minutes and never forgetable pleasures. Having cast off from the shores of the exotic Panamanian wonders, we drift peacefully over the blue, blue, Pacific. Seated in our more than com­fortable decks chairs, we pass the hours, dreaming in sweet content of the joy of once more being home. What a paradise! We count the days and are eager for the time to arrive when the sweet aroma of the ever odiferous city of a thousand and one delights, San Ped­ro by the sea, will be gently wafted to our olifactory pro b 0 sci s. We are constantly on the alert and anx­ious to glimpse once more the spires and steeples of California's play­ground, and once more hear the joy­ous sounds of the Pike drifting to our ears from afar. Long Beach, how we long for and crave thy company. # Mentally we transfer ourselves a thousand miles away, to. the many and varied places of amusement. Our di­verse interests carry us from palaces of the Opera, Museums and Botani­cal endeavors to the dens of iniquity, every ready to reach out and snare the ever willing seafarer. From Grau­man's Chinese to the Silver Sprinkle, we know that we will be well re­ceived and it is with a feeling of ever growing delight that we realize that the time is close at hand. Our tour has been pleasurable and beneficial, but never before have we realized the real meaning of that master who said, " There's no place like home." ••••• The title " Father of the U. S. Navy" may be attributed to Commodore Ed­ward Preble, who commanded ex­pedition against the Barbary pirates in 1803. ...... Send the BLUE BONNET home.