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The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-24
Page 4
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Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-24 - Page 4. April 24, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 31, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/644/show/643.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. (April 24, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-24 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/644/show/643

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-24 - Page 4, April 24, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 31, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/644/show/643.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-24
Creator (Local)
  • Mackenzie, C. J., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Hall, A. D., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Meuhlen, B. M., distribution
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date April 24, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number XVII
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 10
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0423_L.pdf
Transcript Page Four SEE AND KNOW HAWAII ( Continued from Page 1.) cated the busy marts of the village. It is interesting to note that this island has retained more of the oriental at­mosphere than have the other islands. Most of this effect is gained from the practice of hanging fish, dried and fresh, outside of the stores and shops along the main street. To make the whole thing fishy, the natives also sus­pend paper fish from long poles stick­ing above the houses. This island of Maui is further famed by having the largest inactive volcano in the world, the name being Haleakala which means " resting place of the sun." It normally takes a hiking party about four and a half hours of good hiking to reach the summit. The most beautiful time of day on the summit is at dawn and at sunset, when the clouds drift slowly about in the crater far below the rim. The whole crater is lava ash and lava rock. Growing in this formation one can usually find a plant known as " silver- sword," this being the only place in the world where it is found. This is the only plant that grows in lava beds. The crater itself consists of seven cones, from each of which lava was once emitted. These seven cones are all small volcanos in the largest of them all, Haleakala. --- --- SELECTED WHALEBOAT RACE RESULTS Following is the order of finish of boats entered in Selected Crew Whale­boat Races held 3 April 1937, and points towards General Excellence Trophy are awarded as indicated: ( Group " A" ( l2- oared Boats) Pts. Toward Ship Order of Finish Gen. Ex. Trophy Vestal 1 25 Tuscaloosa 2 15 Medusa 3 10 New Orleans 4 5 Chester 5 Northampton 6 Group " B" ( lO- oared Boats) Portland 1 25 San Francisco 2 15 Astoria 3 10 Salt Lake City 4 5 Indianapolis 5 Minneapolis 6 Houston 7 THE BLUE BONNET A BIT OF HISTORY The Hawaiian Islands are describ­ed as a string of emeralds nestling in a setting of purple sea and were char­acterized by Mark Twain as the pret­tiest set of islands anchored in any ocean. The Islands have something in com­mon with the Pleiades; they are eight in number and the analogy can be stretched a little further if we cared to be very technical and mentioned the small dots of satellites that sur­round the well known constellation and compare these with the number­less tufts of land that surround the principal islands of the groups. They zre named: Hawaii, Maui, Kanuai, Molokai, Lanai, Niihan, Oahu, and Kahoolaws. Captain Cook, an English Navi­gator, discovered the Islands in 1778. He called them the Sandwich Islands, grasping with avidity the opportunity of transmitting his wit to posterity. During the ensuing years, rivalry between two tribes caused a great war and in the boil of the tumult they lost their name by virtue of the union of the factional tribes, and from henceforth were known as the Hawai­ian Islands. Kin2" Kamehameha I, became the first king as becomes a conqueror. He ruled from 1795 to 1819, when, becoming weary of the effects of " Koolyhow," and wishing to taste the pleasures of eternal bliss, he died and ascended to heaven in a chariot of fire, as the legends tell. Since that time, eight rulers have reigned successively, being interrupted from time to time in the peacefulness of their sovereignity by the rain of molten lava and brimstone. In 1893 Queen Liliokalani was deposed, her subjects having grown exceedingly tired of pronouncing such a lengthly title, and a provincial government was set up which became a republic in 1894. In 1898 the United States learning that Hawaii really possessed the climate that California professes to have, annexed the Islands and in 1900 made them a territory of our country. Judge: " How many children do you have, Mirandy?" Mirandy: " Well, Jedge, I has two by my first husband, one by my last husband, and then I has two of my own." U. S. S. Houston-- 4- 24- 37- 800. SAL ANSWERS GUS Dear Gus, I ' lowed ' twere time I took my foun­tain pen which Felix Jackson gave me for Christmas, in hand and answered those nice long letters you've been writin' through all last winter. We'uns have been so darned busy, what with the winter's hog- killin' and a quiltin' I just plum run out of time for writin'. But now that spring is here and it's corn- plantin' time and everything is so green and pretty, it seems that romance is just bound to climb my frame. That's when I think most of you Gus, in the spring time when the sap's a runnin'. Last night the moon came up over the barn so soft like and pretty. I just couldn't help but wish you were sittin' with me in the old barrel- stave hammick on the porch. Ma was in the house a playin' that new song " Three O'clock in the Morning" on the gram­aphone and it sure sounded melodious. Made me wish to be a holdin' yore hand agin. Seems funny you bein' a sailor way out on that boat of yours, but from all you tell it can't be lonesome and when you git to be an admiral you'll have it easier than now- that ought to be in a year or two, I reckon. I showed Pa the pictures you took of the ship and he ' lowed as how the chimneys on it were bigger than the ones on Ezra Cutsinger's grist mill. Gus, that Navy sure is a changin' you. You're gettin' so educated I can't understand half you talk about. Some of the words you use are what Ma calls " ponderosities." Maybe all this travelin' and such will make you for­get the old farm and your Sal, ' spe­cially now that you're a goin' to that far distant country where everybody wears clothes made of grass and plays the ukalaley. ' Peers to me it would be foolish to send me a grass skirt. I'd rather have five yards of bright' colored calico and a nice hair ribbon. That shipwreck you told of must have been turrible. Were many killed? Ma's a callin' me to help with the vit­tles, so goodbye for this time. Always, your Sal. ..... Professor: " I will not begin today's lecture until the room settles down." Springer: " Go home and sleep it off, old man."