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The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-17
Page 2
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Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-17 - Page 2. April 17, 1937. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 2, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/639/show/636.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor. (April 17, 1937). The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-17 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/639/show/636

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; Hall, A. D., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-17 - Page 2, April 17, 1937, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 2, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/639/show/636.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1937-04-17
Creator (Local)
  • Mackenzie, C. J., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • Hall, A. D., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Meuhlen, B. M., distribution
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date April 17, 1937
Description Volume IV, Number XVI
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 10
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0419_L.pdf
Transcript r ~ Strange as it seems, Hawaii's great F tourist influx does not occur in the winter months. Eighty- eight degrees is the highest temperature ever re-corded in Honolulu, and June, July, and August are the peak tourist months. Page Two -: THE BLUE BONNET :- A weekly publication, published by the ship's company of the U. S. S. HOUSTON, Captain G. E. Baker, U. S. N., Commandine and Com­mander P. K. Robottom, U. S. N., Executive Officer. EDITOR, Ensign C. J. Mackenzie Asst. Editor: R. C. Ball, Ch. Pay Clerk Associate Editor: A. D. Hall, MMIc Distribution: B. M. Meuhlen, Bueler 10 April 1937 ENGINEERING COMPETITION Versus Fuel Oil Economy Now that the Cruise is under way, it is well to mention a matter that has received scant attention in months p~ st. As perhaps most everyone knows Engineering Competition is based on fuel oil allowance. This allowance is fixed by the Bureau of Engineering and is the same for all ships in the same class. To use exactly what is allowed, both at an­chor and in an underway status, means a 1000/ 0 score. Up to about eighteen months ago the Rambler Ship's average score since commissioning has been well above that called " perfect" and in most instances above that of all other ships in her class. Because of num­erous circumstances beyond our con­trol we received the coveted White " E" for one year only- the competi­tive year 1935- 1936. Since that time interest in the mat­ter of economy has been on the wane; as a result of this lack of combined effort, the HOUSTON slipped from first place to the bottom of the list. During the last quarter the ship jump­ed from that unenviable position to seventh place. That proves we still have what it takes to compete; but we need more of the same thing if we are to take our rightful place among the leaders. The Engineers can cooperate from the fireman on the floorplates to the Chief Engineer; they can make every strenuous effort to boost efficiency thruout the Engineering Department, even so, that isn't all that's required. For complete efficiency and economy all hands must work together. No de­partment can hope to attain perfec­tion without the hearty backing of every other department. THE BLUE BONNET THE Hawai ian Islands first came under one govern­ment when Kam­ehameha I con­quered all the is­lands in 1795. America's only queen was Lilluokal­ani, ruler of Hawaii, who became an American citizen when the U. S. an­nexed the Islands. A fountain of fish flowed in Hono­lulu when workmen struck a subter­ranean reservoir. The daily flow was 10,000,000 gallons of water contain­ing thousands of fish. More than 1,000 varieties of flowers grow in the gardens of Honolulu. The Hawaiian Islands were' names " Sandwich Islands" by Captain Cook, after his patron, the fourth Earl of Sandwich. A single tree, the Hau Kuahiwi, growing in the Hawaiian Islands is the only one of its kind known to exist. The ukulele was invented in Portu­gal. There are twenty islands in the Hawaiian group. The University of Hawaii has the only school in tropical agriculture in the United States. Both King Liholiho and his queen died in Great Britain. They had journ­eyed there on a British warship seeking protection of the British flag, when both w ere overcome with measels. There is no desire to curtail the normal use of fresh water and electric power, however, the amount used de­termines to some extent the consump­tion of fuel oil.. Therefore when elec­tricity and water are wasted, fuel oil is being wasted- indirectly. Only one eighteenth of the entire population of the Hawaiian Islands are Hawaiians. There are almost seven times as man y Japanese in the Hawaiian Islands as Hawaiians. Long before the United States ac­quired Hawaii, the Hawaiian flag was a combination of the American and British flags, adopted by King Kame­hamaeha, in 1854, as his own national flag, and later adopted as the national emblem. One end of the island of Kauai has forty feet of rainfall a year and only five miles away there is a hot desert. On this same island two opposing armies fought a battle with hot stones. Mauna Kea volcano- Although sit­uated in the tropical Pacific, this mounttain is covered with snow many months of the year. It has not erupted within memory of man. Barking Sands- Here sand dunes utter mysterious barks when trod un­der foot or blown by the wind. Captain Cook's Monument is on the island of Hawaii, where he was buried. This plot of ground is owned by Great Britain. He was killed by a native as he was trying to regain his ship. There is a " barefoot football league" in the Hawaiian Islands. All depart­ments of all games are played in bare feet, and some of the records are as­tounding. When Mauna Loa erupted in 1801, natives threw hundr~ ds of live pigs in the flowing lava to appease the fire goddess, Pele. In other words: DON'T BE WASTE­FUL-- Lend a hand by being conserv­ative; don't use all the juice and water that you can, rather, use just what is needed. It's the sensible thing to do and the Engineers will appre­ciate your cooperation.