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The Blue Bonnet 1936-11-14
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Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. The Blue Bonnet 1936-11-14 - Page 1. November 14, 1936. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 1, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/544/show/540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. (November 14, 1936). The Blue Bonnet 1936-11-14 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/544/show/540

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Mackenzie, C. J., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor, The Blue Bonnet 1936-11-14 - Page 1, November 14, 1936, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 1, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/544/show/540.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1936-11-14
Creator (Local)
  • Mackenzie, C. J., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • O'Brien, R. W., associate editor
  • Osborne, W. H., exchange editor
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date November 14, 1936
Description Volume III, Number XLIV
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 9
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0352_L.pdf
Transcript Volume III 1 9 3 7 FLEET MANEUVERS The question of where the United States Fleet will hold annual War Maneuvers was definitely settled when Secretary of the Navy, Claude A. Swanson, disclosed to press re­porters that Hawaiian waters had been selected as the site of the Fleet's spring activities, scheduled to com­mence in May and early June of 1937. Secretary Swanson went on to say that the exercises would be held in approximately the same area as those conducted in 1935. The Pacific waters in which the fleet will maneuver form a triangle ranging between Seattle, the Aleu­tian Islands, and the Hawaiian group, with the possibility of the ships and planes working as far west as Wake Island. ... ATHLETICS The baseball season is nearly finish­ed. The Team failed to place for Iron Man points, not because they didn't work hard nor because they didn't have the stuff. They suffered from hard luck and lack of support from the Ships Company. That is ancient history and we must look to the future instead of the past. Our failure to make any Iron Man points in baseball means that we must work just that much harder in the other sports. We have a good chance in boxing, wrestling, and basketball, the next sports on the calendar. The teams have been work­ing out faithfully. They have natural ability and good coaching. The one thing that will probably mean the dif­ference between success and failure ( Continued on Page Four) San Francisco, Cal., 14 November, 1936 NEW YORK AND TEXAS LEAVE FLEET The two oldest battleships on active duty, the New York and Texas, in commission since 1914, will be with­drawn from the Fleet in the Spring, and assigned to the Training Squad­ron. The ships, with the Oklahoma, make up the Battleship Division One, the Oklahoma is to be assigned to Div. Two, the Tennessee, of that Divi­sion moving up to Div. Three, leaving Div. One with no ships. The New York is to make the Midshipman Practice Cruise during the Summer months while the Texas will take Naval Re­serves on the annual two weeks cruise to sea. ••• YOUR LANGUAGE IS YOU --::-- The first sailorman swore at the elements for upsetting his boat. Sub­sequently sailormen have sworn at the elements, the ship, and each other for upsets of any kind. Lusty lan­guage has been the mark of the sea­goer since the beginning of time. The fury of the winds, the rush of the seas, and the force of many gales have strengthened the sailor's lan­guage until it is as salty, but yet as clean, as the sea itself. The passing of the windjammer and her hardy topsailmen have marked the beginning of a new era at sea and the birth of a new type of sailor­man afloat. Along with this change has come a change in sea language. And this change is definitely for the better. Today the true sailor indulges in very little swearing. An occassional oath escapes him, but as this is rare ( Continued on Page Four) Number XLIV NEW WRITER The Blue Bonnet takes pleasure in introducing to you a new author, who will be known to our many readers as Mr. " X". We hope that we will have an article by him each week. SHIP'S PAPERS --::-- Perhaps some of the enlisted men are dubious regarding the values of a ship's paper. These, probably, are the questions in mind: Is the publi­cation of the ship's paper worth the effort? Why should we have a ship's paper? What does the paper do for the ship? The following may erase the parti­cles of doubt from your mind. It binds the interest of Officers and enlisted men and par e n t s; is encourages worthy ship's enterprises and activi­ties; kindles the spirit of cooperation; knits friendship; is a valuable aid in practical education; and serves to advertise the ship and its work. Also it develops in its staff members such personal qualities as tact, courtesy, initative, accuracy, and leadership; and is a valuable momento to keep through the year.. s. . - Mr. " X" THE SOU D OF THE NAVY --::-- There are many sounds that belong and are produced solely by the Fleet. There is the boom of the fourteen inch, the crack of the anti- aircraft guns, the clatter of the mess- cook's tray, and the creaking of the life boats swinging on their davits­soul~ ds, sounds! Sound's thait only the Navy can produce, but the most interesting and perhaps one of the most important sounds in this good ( Continued On Page Three)