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The Blue Bonnet 1936-04-25
Page 4
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Ball, R. C., editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. The Blue Bonnet 1936-04-25 - Page 4. April 25, 1936. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 2, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/414/show/413.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Ball, R. C., editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. (April 25, 1936). The Blue Bonnet 1936-04-25 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/414/show/413

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Ball, R. C., editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor, The Blue Bonnet 1936-04-25 - Page 4, April 25, 1936, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 2, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/414/show/413.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1936-04-25
Creator (Local)
  • Ball, R. C., editor
  • O'Brien, R. W., associate editor
  • Osborne, W. H., exchange editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Baker, G. W., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date April 25, 1936
Description Volume III, Number XVI
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 8
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 4
File name _0271_L.pdf
Transcript " " Page Four. THE l'" .\ dA C.\ AL ( Continued f~~ m last week) -- -- Gatun spillway,' ~ vhere most of the Electrical Current for the Istmus is generat d, i made of concrete with 14 steel gates and is 80 feet aero s. If all gates were open more water would rush over than goes over ~ he American falls at Kiagara. There are six pairs of Locks: Three pairs at Gatun; 1 pair at Pedro Mi­guel and 2 pairs at ~ lirailores. Gatun locks are 1 1 G miles long. Pedro l\ Iiguel Locks are 516 of a mile long, and l\' Iiraflores Locks are 1 mile plus. Locks are double barrelled, per­mitting ships to go in opposite direc­tions simultaneously. Each 10 k is 1000 feel long and 110 feet wide and 70 feet deep. They are capable of earing for the largest ships afloat. l\ Iiraflores Locks have extra depth because of tidal variations in the Pacific. Tidal variation in the Atlan­tic is about one foot while on the Paci­fic the tidal varation is 121 2 feet and the tide has been kno ' n to vary 21 feet. The total canal receipts to and in­cluding June 30, 1932, were • 292,864, 828.37. Greatest amount of tolls in any month was 2,5~ 2,815.12 in January, 1929. At Balboa is a drydock capable of receiving any ship that can " ransit the canal. It is 1000 feet long and 110 feet wide with a depth over keel blocks of · 13 feet at high tide. The coaling plant at Cristobal can load 1,500 tons of coal per hour which is as £ a:; t as any ship can receive it. The number ~ f toll paying vessels pas ing through the Canal to . June 30, 1D32, was G9,466. Of these, 30,917 were Amel'ican Regbtry, 19,192 Brit­ish, 3.75' 3 Norwegian, 2,: 566 J'\ pane e, 8DS Chilean, 920 Peruvian, 11,532 Dan­ish, 1,- 188 Dut': h. 1,:; 31 French, ~, I; 5: j German, and the remaindel' und'r yadou flal::. United State Government and aval Ship: al'e e.' empted from tolls and during the above period 6,325 of . these shil; s tran ' ited the Canal. Ves sels owned antI operated by the Govt. of P nama and Colombia do not pay tolls. It requires the following force to n'aintain and operate the Canal: ;;, 100 American 01' " Gold" emvloy­ees. TlIE BLUE BONNET 10,350 Alien or " Silver" employees. This is one seventh of the entire strength of the United States avy. The Panama Railroad extends from Panama City to Colon and is 47.61 miles in length. It was built in 1 50­55 and was the first railroad ever to Cl'o~ S the American continent. It pre­ceded by 1 · 1 years the first transcon­tinental railroad in the United States. The following are some of the dis­tance saved by the canal: CITIES MILES San Francisco to New York 7873 to Pemambuco 3002 to Fre town 1366 Liverpool to San Francisco 5666 to Valparaiso 1540 to Callao ., 4" 43 to Honolulu .______ 4403 " to Wellington, N. Z. __.. 1336 New York to Callao .. 6250 to Yokohama 3357 to Sidney, Australia 3615 to Valparaiso .. , 3747 to Guayaquil 7405 to Wellington, N. Z. 2822 • • ?? WHO RE tEMBERS ?? Four Years Ago This lonth.- The entire month of April was spent in Shanghai, China, moored to the favored buoys 15 and 16. Aftel two months of little or no liberty, this month was made quite pleasant to our former Houstonites with the return of regular overnight liberty. The greater part of the city was re­stricted, although it happened the favorite haunts of all hands were in the prescribed Ii berty areas. The great assemblage of war craft of various nations vhich was pre sent during the previous months was reduced to nearly half, with the trou­bled conditions omewhat quiet. Our Aviation Unit managed to get in a few hours flight time during this month by leaving port on the U. S. S. FI ' Crl. basin~ near the , addle Is­la'HI: off the mouth of the Yan~ tze. During this time the interdivisional ,- port · rivalry wa: at its peak with baseball, ' occer and football being the most popular sport. The Pootung side of the river, beinl.:' unaffected by the dis Jute in Shanghai, was the scene of many bitterly contested, although thoroughly enjoyed contests. ~ ... Turn Out Unnecessary Lights ~ . S. S. Houston- 4- 25- 36- 900. ' EWS OF FORMER SHIPMATES ( Continued From Page One) " Frankie" Remus, now BM2c., for­mer genial member of the HOUSTON l\ IAA force is serving aboard the U. S. S. TENNESEE once more, having recently completed a tour of duty at Trona field, San Pedro. Through a member of the crew Frankie sends re­gards to former shipmates aboard the HOUSTON. * * • * * * * * " Willie" Yates, SK3c, just recently transferred for duty at the Texas Centennial, writes telling about his new duties. t present Willie is stationed at NTS, San Diego renewing acquaintances with the rifle etc. It is his intention to keep us well informed concerning the Naval part in the coming Centennial. No doubt, many of us envy Yates in his pleasant assignment. .... THE EPAULETS A D SHOULDER MARKS These are worn by officers and came down from old times when fighting men engaged in hand to hand fighting and the shoulders offered a vulner­able spot to a man wielding a heavy sab r. Also it wa the most logical spot offered by a man on horseback attacking a foot soldier, hence a heavy plate of metal was worn to protect the shoulders. In the old armor suits the shouldel's were reinforced by cpecially thick metal. -_._......--- WllAT TO SEE IN PANAMA --::-- '( Continued From Page One) --::-- The Church of the Golden Altar, a rar and priceless historic edifice. Balboa and Ancon Clubhouses, operated for the benefit of Canal Zone employees and people of the CO'l1­munity. Service men are always welcome to the privileges offered by the Clubhouses. NAVY RELIEF SOCIETY ( Continued Fr~ m Page One) terest, 21< 1,734.09: These loans are repaid by monthly allotments. Remember these figures when you are next asked to contribute to this YOlll' Service Charity, to aid a fellow shipmate who has found it hard to make both end' meet.