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The Blue Bonnet, 1934-09-22
Page 2
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Berkley, J. B., editor. The Blue Bonnet, 1934-09-22 - Page 2. September 22, 1934. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 3, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/41/show/38.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor. (September 22, 1934). The Blue Bonnet, 1934-09-22 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/41/show/38

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor, The Blue Bonnet, 1934-09-22 - Page 2, September 22, 1934, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 3, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/41/show/38.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet, 1934-09-22
Creator (Local)
  • Berkley, J. B., editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Kessler, K. O.
  • Botterell, R. E.
  • Berg, G. C.
  • Holt, Jack
  • Post, R. W.
  • Reynolds, R. J.
  • Razlaff, Joe
  • McCroary, F. A.
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (HOT)
  • Houston Ship Cannel
Date September 22, 1934
Description Volume I, Number IV
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0025_L.pdf
Transcript -: THE BLUE BONNET :- September 22, 1934. Page Two Continued on page four STOKERS NOTES Just arriving at the port all have been waiting to get to, maneuvers completed and the stokers resting up after the grind. Losing our number one throttleman in Houston, Pelosi, MM1c, looks like before we get through we will be turning our hats around on watch. One of the gang just returned from leave way back there in them thaI' hills and here is the story he tells: ­" One morning I started to my traps with my muzzle- loader shotgun over my shoulder and had gone about a mile from my cabin when to my sur­prise I was surrounded by game. In front of me was a large flock of ducks swimming in a straight line up the river; to my right was a big black bear; on my left was a deer, and be­hind me was a rattlesnake. As I had only enough packing for two shots I decided to load each barrel with a double load. I aimed straight ahead at the ducks and fired. The explos­ion blew me into the river and while still there I began loOking around to see what had happened. Well, sir, when that gun went off the right hand lead curved around and killed the bear, the left killed the deer, the ramrod flew forward and strung up up the ducks, and the gunstock went catapulting backward and killed the snake. I decided I'd better get out of the river and gather up my trophies to take home, but my pockets and trousers were so full of fish I could hardly move. I did manage to get up on the bank but just as I stooped to examine the deer one of the buttons of my trousers flew off from the strain and killed a partridge which was sitting on a log to the right of me. I returned home to get my mule, Old Beck, hitched her to my sleigh and drove to the scene of my hunt. All of the game loaded I turned a­round and arrived home about noon in a pouring rain. That night was the most beautiful I ever saw. There was snow on the ground, the woods were on fire, the moon was shining, and it was pouring down rain." Now talk about your fish stories well I guess this one takes the fur lined mittens. Continued on page four of friendship have been made firmer, that we have proven ourselves worthy of the hospitality extended to us. No A. O. L's., no disorders, no regrets for the wrong things we did, but only the finest feelings of having done right and that in the near future we will be able to return to Houston ana continue our pleasant ties. A per­fect Navy Crew, of a perfect Navy Ship, of a perfect City. And remember - don't be an S. O. B. MARINE ASK CREDIT THE BLUE BONNET In one of the recent editions of this sheet a comment was made to the effect that the Marine Detach­ment on this ship were merely a decorative unit and assumed not capable of being of any beneficial use to the ship as a whole, and in any line. Inasmuch as this came under the column facetiously headed " Slap­sticks" we wish to draw the readers attention to the fact that it was more or less in the spirit of a " Slapstick" and nothing more. It seems that a little clarifying of the matter is in order and we herewith reprint a statement written and submitted by an irked member of the detachment. We wholly agree with him in the fact that they are useful and we wish them to receive due credit for the spirit they have shown and the honors they have brought to this ship. " It was with some surprise that we noticed the Marine Detachment listed under the heading of decorative impedimentae, to be included in the factors of nominal value only. " Let us be perfectly honest and frank. A Marine Detachment is used to furnish pomp for official occas­ions. It is also used in other ways. In the maning of gun stations in particular, and it must be admitted that they have discharged their duties in that line more than credit­ably. Two Majorie Sterrett prizes for the highest score of 5" gun class, one all time record at short range battle practice, and the deciding score for the winning of the Daughters of the American Revolution prize for anti- aircraft gunnery, can hardly be discounted as inconsequential in a re­capitulation of the sort mentioned. In the field of sports, to which con­siderable importance is attached by R. E. Botterell, Sle Jaek Holt, Sle R. J. Reynolds, SM3e F. A. MeCroary, S2e K. O. Kes. ler, Sle G. C. Berc, cY R. W. Post, AOM3e Joe Razlaff, Sle A weekly publication published by the . hip'. eomp. ny of the U. S. S. HOUSTON, Captain W. B. Woodson, U. S. N., Command­inc and Commander F. D. Manoek, U. S. N., Eueutive Olrieer. PEP TALK Lt. ( jc) J. B. Berkley.- Editor. -: CONTRffiUTORS :- HOUSTON, TEXAS - just up the channel. To us on board it means the ful­fillment of a promise and a dream painted in the brightest colors by the ' old- timers'. To the people of Hous­ton it means the return of the prodi­gal - home after four years of wan­derings. How to express the feelings of all of us on this occassion is be­yond the ability of the writer but the significance is self apparent. The HOUSTON belongs to the City of Houston and its people. They pride themselves on having such a ship bear the name of their city. We pride ourselves on it too, because the name of Houston has ever been a name of accomplishment from its very beginning with General Houston to this very day of our arrival. It will always be such. We have visited many places, traveled many miles, and done many things, but of all these all hands will agree that our ' home' port, Houston, Texas, is the best. The air has been full of whisper­ings and rumors of what Houston is planning for us. Houstonites have never been niggardly in their hospi­tality and this occasion is no except­ion to the rule. We are glad to be here and we are proud to be members of the crew of the HOUSTON and we are going to make Houston still proud­er of us. To our perfect hosts we can be perfect guests when ashore, and aboard we can do our little part in being the perfect hosts to those who come aboard for a visit. Every man can do his share to make this visit a perfect one. Resolve that when the ship leaves Houston for the open sea we will leave them with a feeling that we have made new friends among the old, that the bonds