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The Blue Bonnet, 1936-04-04
Page 4
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Pierce, W. W., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. The Blue Bonnet, 1936-04-04 - Page 4. April 4, 1936. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 1, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/399/show/398.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pierce, W. W., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor. (April 4, 1936). The Blue Bonnet, 1936-04-04 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/399/show/398

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Pierce, W. W., editor; Ball, R. C., assistant editor; O'Brien, R. W., associate editor; Osborne, W. H., exchange editor, The Blue Bonnet, 1936-04-04 - Page 4, April 4, 1936, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 1, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/399/show/398.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet, 1936-04-04
Creator (Local)
  • Pierce, W. W., editor
  • Ball, R. C., assistant editor
  • O'Brien, R. W., associate editor
  • Osborne, W. H., exchange editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Baker, G. W., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Date April 4, 1936
Description Volume III, Number XIII
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 8
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 4
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
File Name _0262_L.pdf
Transcript Page Four. THE BLUE BONNET USS Houston- 4- 4- 36- 800. ....... • I'" " CHILE" THE CRUISE different than Sailor:- " Why do you go out with that dame?" Marine:- " She's other girls." Sailor:- " How is that?" Marine:- " She is the only girl that will go out with me." DECORATION OF GRAVES Brentano's Book Store, 63 East Washington Street, Chicago, offers two new books on Chile: South America by Agnes Rottery Per. $ 4.00 Chile by Cox. ( present day Chile) Per. $ 3.00. .. .,. wish to !' pend larger sums on flowers, special floral emblems of proportion­ately larger size and value will be purchased. Such decorations as are sent direct to either Chaplain, or which are delivered to him by florists, will be placed upon the designated graves as soon as received. All correspondence and remittances pertaining to the decoration of graves should be addressed to: The Chaplain, Fort Meyer, Va. ( for Arlington); or to: The Chaplain, Presidio of San Fran­cisco, California, and should be in his hands by May 25, 1936. It will not be possible to fill orders after that date. Requests should indicate the AME RANK and ORGANIZATION of th~ deceased, and if possible, the GRAVE or LOT NUMBER WITH SECTION in which the deceased is buried. ( Continued From Page One) ( Continued on Page Four) the city. Following luncheon, an ex­cursion by motor cars' with guides will be made around the city, visiting the principal business sections and through the wide and beautiful ave­nues, the Alemeda de las Delicias, ascend Santa Lucia Hill for a mag­nificant panarorna. Thence to Cerro San Cristobal, the Race course, etc. Dinner at a l~ ading hotel in San­tiago. The special train will leave Santiago for Valparaiso at 7: 00 p. m. The cost of the trip including guides, automobile hire, luncheon and dinner is $ 15.00. Send Easter Greetings home via Western Union. Reduced rates to all parts of the country. See Mail Clerk for further information, or poster on Post Olfice Bulletin Board. ..,. DON'T WASTE WATER • I • the officer- of- the- deck. " Heave- to," cried the royal messenger, for it was he, " and let me inspect this frieght that you have to see if there are any aboard that do not bare the royal mark." Shortly there clambered over the bow a dripping figure, such as none of us had ever seen before. The body that of human, but covered with a slimy green, reminding one of the bottom- most depths of the sea, while the head was that of a sword fish. In his hand was tightly gripped a handbag of as slimy and green an appearance as himself. Straight- a­way he proceeded to the quarter­deck, where advised of the visit by an excited orderly, the Captain await­ed the noble visitor, and to whom he rendered a most precise military sa­lute. The figure then informed the Captain that he had been sent by his noble king, H eptunnus Rex" to in­form the · Captain that aboard his good ship were many landlubbers, etc., and that he was highly insulted at their audacity in approaching so close to his domain. Before they were to be permitted to enter they must submit to terrible tortures, to deter­mine if they were fit to become sub­jects of so worthy a king. To accom­plish this it would be necessary that the royal court board the ship on the morrow and determine the character of the candidates. The Captain in­formed the messenger that he was pleased to turn his ship over to the king, he being a royal subject himself. With this assurance the royal mes­senger departed as he had come. Our little crowd then dispersed, each, I fear \ vith as wildly palpitating a heart as mine, and turned into our ham­mocks to dream of dragons and gob­lins, even as we did in our child- hood. ( To be continued next week.) Note:- Our Executive Officer, Com­mander Robottom, was Executive Of­ficer on the DENVER at the time this initation took place. Upon in­terviewing Comdr. Robottom, we are informed that this story ( and the con­tinued installment)" i~ the unmerciful truth. " The nearly killed me" remi­nisced Comdr. Robottom." IT HAPPENED THEN! Many Polly- Wogs, landlubbers, in the good ship HOUSTON are wonder­ing just what Neptunus Rex has in store for them when they cross the equator. We have discovered that several very interesting things hap­pened to the non- shell backs on board the U. S. S. DENVER on Christmas Eve, 1918. DENVER CROSSES THE CIRCLES According to custom in the United States Navy, the first time that a man crosses the equator is supposed to be quite an eventful moment in his life, and in order to impress this very forcibly on his memory his ship­mates, who have already been duly initated into the solemn and myster­ious realms of Neptunnus Rex, pre­pare a little ceremony which is very unique. As a landlubber I had always cherished the belief that " the line" was something tangible, some­thing that could be felt, and now as " an honest shell- back" I can truth­fully say that it IS something that can be felt, least- wise I felt it the first time I crossed. That event fell on the twenty- fourth day of December Nineteen hundred and eighteen, while I was on board the good ship DENVER, then en route for Rio de Janeiro; Brazil. For seve­ral days notices had been posted on the bulletin board purported as having come from the royal domain of " His Highness, • eptunnus Rex, King of the Sea," exhorting his loyal subjects, ( those who had already crossed), to record the sins of all " landlubbers, pollywogs, and sea- lawyers," that they might be punished and purged of those !' ins e're they be permitted to pass through the domain of such an ex­haulted ruler. Individuals were de­scribed, their sins enumerated and some of the most terrible penalties prescribed, and had any sought to curry favor, I would have feared for his life. On the evening of the twenty- third we, poor misguided landlubbers that we were, were on the main deck dis­cussing the then vague possibility of our ever living to enjoy a ripe old age, when from out of the dark blue waters came the sound of a sonorous voice crying, " Ship ahoy! What ship?" " The good ship Denver bearing many loyal subjects who wish to enter the royal domain of Neptunnus Rex," answered