Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

1936-02-01
Page 1
File size: 542 KB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
1936-02-01 - Page 1. February 1, 1936. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/359/show/355.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(February 1, 1936). 1936-02-01 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/359/show/355

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

1936-02-01 - Page 1, February 1, 1936, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/359/show/355.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title 1936-02-01
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Date February 1, 1936
Description Volume III, Number V
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Mare Island, California
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 8
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0236_L.pdf
Transcript * --. s. s. " D~- rO"* "- Volume III THE PAY OFFICE Receiving, disbursing and account­ing for government money k\ eeps four of our good shipmates busy every day. Ship~ oard account$ lcy differs in almost every respect from commercial acounting. The govern­ment has spent years perfecting the present system of bookkeeping and and accountancy. Keeping the accounts of the officers and crew of a vessel is quite a task. DU1' inv; the past quarter ( 1 Oct. to 31 Dec.) 966 accounts were handled on this vessel alone. The ship's comple­ment during this period was 659, but changes in pay accounts were neces­sary with 113 men being rated, 35 men discharged and transferred to FNR. Of this last number 16 re­enlisted, $ 106. extra compensation was given making the total cash dis­bursement for the quarter $ 124,938.64. This amount was disbursed under 3800 different payments. During the quarter we received 243 new men aboard and transferred 262. In small stores approximately 500 issues were made amounting to $ 2846.43. Allotments, always a big item in the service, keeps the entire section on their toes, with the total value of the allotments on this vessel $ 28,475.83 divided among 474 differ­ent allotments. During the quarter 94 new allotments were registered, 27 were stopped and 61 expired. In addition to handling the pay ac­counts paying public vouchers, that is, paying civilian ~ ontractors for supplies bouv; ht from them and used on board, this task requires two men's CatilUl.......... 4 Mare Island, Calif. Febuary 1, 1936 U. S. s. SMITH TO BE LAUNCHED FEBRUARY 20 At 10: 30 Thursday, 20 February, the U. S. S. SMITH will be launched from the ways at the Mare Island Navy Yard. The SMITH is one of the sixteen 15,00 ton destroyers built un­der the allotment for naval construct­ion out of NRA funds. The ship is named in memory of Lieut. Joseph Bryant Smith, U. S. N. Smith commanded the U. S. S. Con­gress when that ship was sunk by the Confederate Ram, Merrimac, at Hampton Roads, Virginia, March 8, 1862. Mrs. Yancy S. Wiliams has been appointed official sponsor for the ship. From the earliest days of sea borne craft, launching ceremonies have been performed to initiate the ship to the sea. There is a record of christening ceremonies of the date 21( 10 B. C. At different places and at different times these ceremonies have taken various forms and had various signi­fances. In Tahiti is was once the cus­tom to shed human blood at launching ceremoies. The Chinese for centuries have had very elaborate ceremony. Wine was used in rituals of the early days. Later, the Romans used water as a token of purification in the solemn priestly blessing. Christian ceremonies, as in pagan ceremonies, used wine as the sacrement and water as the token of purification. Launching ceremonies have always had a religious significance. In the Middle Ages, ships were always nam­ed after saints; shrines were placed e- ti 4 Number V SHIP'S. DANCE A SUCCESS Enjoyable Affair The Ship's Dance, our second since arrival in the yard, was, in the opinion of all who attended, a very enjoyable affair. Even though the weather man fail­ed us again, a gay and colorful crowd of over 400 were in attendance. The ochestra, one of the best ever procured for a HOUSTON Dance, were at their best, rendering a fine assortment of the latest dance hits, keeping dance lovers' programs well filled. Once again the popularity of the punch was 100 percent, while the regular bar received a good patronage from these who preferreli beer as a refreshment. The Dance Committee's successful effort toward this pieasing affair is genuinely appreciated by all. Once again the good ship HOUSTON and her snappy crew may feel proud in having staged an affair that will long be remembered as an enjoyable oc­casion, not only for themselves, but their many friends as well. COMMITTEE Lt. Comdr. Arnold, Lt.( jg) Schanze, Ch. Mach. Gallager, LaTour, CFC, Herrick, CWT, O'Brien, BMlc, Yelver­ton, Yeo1c, Vizard, Phmlc. Crego, EM2c., Sivak, SK3c, Freeman, GM3c, Smith, Cox, McMurphy, SM3c. Ken­nedy, Sealc, and Schrumm, Sealc. Wade, Bmkr2c, and Osborne, Ye03c. were the volunteer patrol.