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1935-05-04
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1935-05-04 - Page 1. May 4, 1935. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/187/show/183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(May 4, 1935). 1935-05-04 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/187/show/183

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

1935-05-04 - Page 1, May 4, 1935, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/187/show/183.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 1935-05-04
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Date May 4, 1935
Description Volume II, Number XVII
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Long Beach, California
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 5
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0118_L.pdf
Transcript VoL n .-. Long Beach, Calif., May 4, 1935. MARINE DETACHMENT ISSUE Number XVII THE U. S. MARINE CORPS Great Britain, having the first modern naval organization, was the first to form units of marines as they are known today. They were men ac­customed to the sea and qualified in other respects to perform the tacti­cal missions for which marines were then, and are now destined, i. e., first, to help fight a ship; second, to capo. ture and hold land approaches of a harbor to be used by naval vesii\ els; and third to furnish a small compact unit for offensive action, generally refered to as a landing force. Among • the first Federal troops authorized by Continental Congress, were two battalions of Marines, or­ganized in November, 1775 and used to good effect during the Revolution­ary War. In the Navy of today, the Marines fullfill the same tactical missions as did Marines of the past. They man the secondary batteries, on first and second class ships.~ ach year since the War of 1898, they have served in the protection of American lives and pro­perty, or assisted in naval actions. The places and 0 c cas ion s are too numerous to mention more than sketchily: 1899- Phillippine insurec­tion and Samoan uprising; 1900­Phillippines and Peking; 1901 and 1902- uprising on the island of Sa­mar and a landing force at Panama; 1903- Santo Domingo and Korea; 1904- Panama ( the forming or the Republic); 1906 to 1909- Cuban Army eoatinued on paKe four BLAINE WASHINGTON As Blaine, Washington has been designated as our 4th of July port, what' information on hand is publish­ed for information of all hands: Situated on the Canadian Border. Population approximately 2500. It is 1237 miles from San Diego and 130 miles from Seattle. We are due to arrive on 3 July and depart 5 July. --* 0*-- THE GUNNERY OFFICER SAYS: " Now that the Gunnery year has ended with '!- he Houston well up a­mong the leaders, the ensuing few months are to be utilized in polishing up on many of the things that go to make up a real fighting ship. To­ward that end may be expected Land­ing Force Drill and a chance to fam­iliarize ourselves with the Landing Guns and the new 37 mm Gun, re­cently received on board. Also, with the construction of our new back stop, small- bore sharks will have a chance to tryout their eyes. To those who are not familiar with Rifle and Machine guns, due instructions will be given, as well as an opportunity to fire through the Small- bore Course. There is to be no let- down in the large state of efficiency which con­stant drill and hard work has brought us. Short, snappy drills will be held, and all hands are expected to keep on their toes, so that when the new gunnery year begins, we can hang up • a score for all others to shoot at." --* 0;-- SeDd the BLUE BONNET hom.. WANDERING The rattle of the chains up thru the hause- pipes of a ship, outward bound, destination unknown, is a definite sensation, a pleasant one, for those who dislike the same streets, the same haunts for relaxation, liberty after liberty. The old attraction of new places is one that seldom grows old for a man without ties. Going is often confused with leaving. There is something final about the first surge of the screws; all ties are broken ir­revocably for the time at least. Mem­ories, the only reward of the wander­er when wandering is done, are better for a little age and much contrast. Surely an itinerary with more con­trasts than that of this ship since commissioning would be hard to imagine. Southampton, with it's traditional rain, lack of restraurants, left- handed traffic and bar curfews, is followed by Rotterdam, a port busy with strange small craft and ocean going vessels, outlet for the trade of central Eur­ope, cobble stones and the Skeedam Skeedyke, toughest street in any land. Then Le Havre, shipping port for Paris and for the Houston tourists, the beginning of a 7 hour trip to Paris; Paris the home of the " Cocotte" and the Mona Lisa, the former no less advertised than the latter, altho the valuation is very different. Many will remember the " Palais de Glaces" with it's feminine decorations sur­rounded by mirrors. Then home for Christmas holidays and the telling of Continued on page two