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The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03
Page 4
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 4. April 3, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1174.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (April 3, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 4. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1174

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 4, April 3, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1174.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan, associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Lahaina Roads, Maui
Date April 3, 1938
Description Volume VI, Number 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 10
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 4
File name ussbb_201402_013_004.jpg
Transcript Page 4 THE BLUE BONNET H U.S.S. Houston^4-3-38—800. Close Shaves Saturday, the day of the Big Roll, Dan Daly of the Shipfitters' lusty crew, had quite an experience and a nearly fatal one. Working on a sea sled on the quarter deck, Danny was caught in a big wave and went past the lifelines. Holding to a line till the ship heeled over again he came back aboard. All Danny had left to show for his experience was a soaked skin and his pipe. It. was, as always, clamped in his teeth and he didn't let go of it either. John Fabick, Sgt. of our Marine Detachment, was crossing the boat deck when one big roll and a wave came along. Then Johnny found himself gripping a stanchion with his legs and the lifeline with both hands. His pleas for help were soon answered and Johnny headed for lower deck spaces. Some say he never came out till evening. Due to failure to get to sleep, because the bunk was swapping ends on me, I took a stroll, from side to side, and got as far as the forward messing compartment. I found dishes all over the place, and water chasing a bunch of section leaders across the deck. In the Armory Freeman, GM2c, was being assisted by Lambert, Cpl., who couldn't sleep either, in swabbing up water on deck. I arrived in time to see Herkie take a slide across the deck to end up half way under the work bench. That marine can sure use a swab. Looked in on Turret Three and things were sliding fast. Wicker was busy trying to keep ahead of some grease pots and had the gun sponge lashed in a shell tray. That boy is master of any situation, and he sure handled that one neatly. After the roll was over it seems we all sat up and took a deep breath, but it was too soon for the boys in the Evaporators. 'Doc' Emerson, F2c, was busily working away when a roll dislodged a coffee pot, bounced it off the bulkhead and dashed it upon and all over the Doc's shoulders and back. Too bad fellow. We sympathize with all the boys who were injured during these trying days and bid them speedy returns to health. Lt. Schanze Detached Lieutenant E. S. Schanze, at present 4th division officer, will be detached at Pearl Harbor on our arrival there. He will then assume the duties as assistant communication officer for the 14th Naval District. Serving as radio officer, and later as "F" division officer up until recently, when he took over the 4th, Lt. Schanze will be remembered as a well liked and efficient officer. All hands bid him goodbye and wish him the best of luck in his new assignment. Wasner's Motto 'Tis batter to have lunched and lost than never to have lunched at all. A History Of The Pineapple (From Page 1.) are the variety of pineapple grown in the Hawaiian Islands for commercial use. They are not planted from seeds but from the cone shaped crowns which grow on the top of the fruit, slips which grow from the stalk just below the fruit, and shoots which grow off the main stem. After the soil has been cultivated and finely pulverized it is treated with about 4000 lbs of fertilizer per acre and then shaped into long low hills. Long strips of paper, 300 feet long by 3 feet wide, are put down by horse drawn roller devices to preserve moisture, increase the temperature of the soil by absorbing and retaining the sun's heat, and to keep the weed growth down. The plants are then planted by hand in rows through openings cut in the paper with planting irons. The irons also soil around the butts so that they are firmly anchored. The growing takes from 20 to 24 months. Shortly after the first year, a blossom appears which gradually takes the form of the fruit, its tiny blue flowers disappearing as it grows. The spaces between the rows are cultivated and fertilized during the growing period, and every month an iron sulphate or copperas "tonic" is applied to the leaves. This "tonic" is necessary to prevent a yellowing of the leaves from Chlorosis. These plants generally bear for three years, the first crop producing the largest pineapples averaging about 5 pounds each. The picking is done by hand by breaking the fruit off at the stem. The harvesting has to be carefully timed because if picked too green it will not ripen, and not too late as fermentation sets in shortly after full maturity. It is only through the aid of scientific developements in cultivation and canning that this de- licous fruit has been transformed from the food of kings to the food of our own table in any part of the world. Elimination Bouts (From Page 1.) it had a chance to get started. Aubin hit the lad and down he went. As he came up again he was returned to the deck. It was declared a knockout. Teschnor of the F and Moulton of the 3rd came on and gave a good scrap. Teschnor was apparently the better of the two from the way he carried himself and boxed. Moulton had a wicked left which if he had ever got into action might have told a different story. As it was, Moulton received a rather negligent cut on the eye, and Teschnor won the decision. That was the one where Borghetti nearly lost his voice. The final bout was a bit heavier than the ones before, with "Singin' Sam" Ashcraft of the R and Dalton of the 3rd. Sam came in with those long arms of his and punched like a mule kicks, but that lad from the Main Deck Aft can really take it. He held Sammy to a draw and it was a real bout that had all hands present on their toes. It would be nice to see a return match between the two lads. All in all it was a fine display of good sportsmanship. When we get down to the finals and have the smoker there should be some mighty pretty bouts. Anyone missing these bouts is missing a lot of fun and enjoyment. Thursday's Bouts Swatski of the 3rd dug into Kuschill of the 5th with so much vengance that Kuschill's handlers tossed the towel in the 1st round (1 minute and 25 seconds). F division entry, Rogers, won the decision over Davidson of the 1st in a bout which left both very tired. Haratyk, Spud Cox'n of the S, fought the battle of the century with Jasin- ski of the C division. Result was a draw. Don't forget the finals in boxing and wrestling at Pearl Harbor. There'll be action aplent.y