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The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03
Page 2
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 2. April 3, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1172.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (April 3, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1172

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 2, April 3, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1172.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan, associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Lahaina Roads, Maui
Date April 3, 1938
Description Volume VI, Number 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 10
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 2
File name ussbb_201402_013_002.jpg
Transcript Page 2 THE BLUE BONNET THE BLUE BONNET :— A weekly publication of the ship's company of the U.S.S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U.S.N.. Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U.S.N., Executive Officer. Editor. Lieut, (jg) E. A. McDonald, U.S.N. Assistant Editor: Ensign J.P.M. Johnston Associate Editor: Stefan Sivak, Jr., SK2c Associate Editor: W.J. Bannen, Seaman lc Cartoonist: W.C. Ridge Circulation: John Boris, Y3c Printer R. L. Beckwith, Sealc April 3, 1938 Don't Waste Water ! ! ! It's the same story again - with the same theme, but with a different setting. Don't waste water ! Don't use more than is absolutely necessary ! We're in tropical waters now where the temperature is high and the atmosphere is damp. Nothing is as refreshing as a cool shower. With skin wastes and the surface blood cooled by a shower bath, one feels a lot better. It is human nature to remain under a shower longer than is absolutely essential. Yet anyone aboard can be just as permanently refreshed with a short shower as with a long one. To those who prepare food go a warning. Use only enough water to accomplish your purpose. Any amount over this is waste. Cooperate, with the engineering department by saving water. The evaporators can only make so much water. At present the average daily consumption is 21,000 gallons, an amount e- qual to that of a battleship's, and being twice as great as our normal expenditure while we were anchoredat Long Beach, Californa. In Pearl Harbor it may be necessary to clamp down our decks with fresh water. All hands must be doubly careful. Conserve the water. Otherwise the use of fresh water will be restricted. It's no fun for anybody when water has to be rationed out. "Lighthouse no glood for flog," say Chinaman. "Lighthouse he shine, whistle he blow, bell he ling, and flog he come just the same. No glood.'' Houston Host To Destroyer Destroyer 214 (TALBOT,.) knifed through the seas and sidled up to the Houston for fueling just the other day. They then received fuel, bread, ice cream, and copies of the Blue Bonnet from our ship. In exchange the Talbot tossed over a sheaf of Honolulu newspapers, week old papers, yet welcome because they put us a bit closer to the civilization on land. There wasn't anything unusual in this. There was something familiar a- bout one of the faces aboard the des- troer though. Lt. Comdr. Vanzant, attached to the Houston last year as assistant first Lieutenant and well re-< membered by all old hands, waved a cheery "hello" from the destroyer's bridge. He is commanding officer of the Talbot. The recent rough weather had left its mark on the destroyer. Many onlookers aboard the Houston were secretly glad then that they hadn't had to weather the storm on the destroyer. Yes, I heard what you said. It was tough aboard our ship during that heavy weather, but if you think it was any bed of roses on that destroyer you better go right up to the sick bay to have your head examined. The following appropriate poem seems to show vividly a bit of what life i» aboard a destroyer. The Destroyer Men There's a roll and pitch and a heave and a hitch To the nautical gait they take, For they're used to the cant of the decks aslant As the white-toothed combers break On the plates that thrum like a beaten drum To the thrill of the turbines'might, As the knife-bow leaps through the yeasty deeps With the speed of a shell in flight ! Oh ! Their scorn is quick for the crews who stick To a battleship's steady floor, For they love the lurch of their own frail perch At thirty-five knots or more. They don't get much of the drills and such That the battleship jackies do, But they sail the seas in their dungarees, A grimy destroyer's crew. They needn't climb at their sleeping time To a hammock that sways and bumps, They leap - kerplunk - in a cosy bunk That quivers and bucks and jumps. They hear the sounds of the seas that pound On the half-inch plates of steel And close their eyes to the lullabies Of the creaking frame and keel. They're a lusty crowd and they're vastly proud Of the slim, swift ci-aft the drive, Of the roaring flues and the humming screws Which make her a thing alive. They love the lunge of her surging plunge And the murk of her smoke-screen, too, As they sail the seas in their dungarees, A grimy destroyer's crew. Berton Braley Did You Know ? "Anyone would think I was drunk," said Westerfield as he reeled away. In Hawaii Octupus is considered a delicacy. The Thurston lava tube on the island of Hawaii is the largest in the world. There are 3095 miles of roads on the Hawaiian Islands. Hawaii produces 10,000,000 pounds of coffee each year. A Tall Story Marine: "Yes, when I was in Africa a lion ran across my path. I had no gun in my hand so I took a pail of water and poured it over his head and he ran away." Sailor: "I can vouch for that. I was in Africa at the time and as the lion ran past me I stroked his mane and it was still quite damp."