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The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03
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McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 1. April 3, 1938. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 2, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1171.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor. (April 3, 1938). The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1171

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor; Sivak, Stefan, associate editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor, The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03 - Page 1, April 3, 1938, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 2, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1175/show/1171.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1938-04-03
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
  • Sivak, Stefan, associate editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Boris, John, circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy
Place of Creation (Local)
  • Lahaina Roads, Maui
Date April 3, 1938
Description Volume VI, Number 1
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 10
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name ussbb_201402_013_001.jpg
Transcript Volume VI, Number 1. Lahaina Roads, Maui April 3, 1938. Elimination Bouts In Number Two With Lt. (jg) McDonald, Lt. (jg) Dibrell, CCStd. Barnett as judges, and Ens. Ely as the referee the bouts began. The lead-off came with McCollough of M and Dal- ton of B division. It was anybody's fight till Dalton began to toss some hefty ones and it was the end then for the M division's entry, who lost by a decision. In the next bout it was a case of the little fellow and the fellow with the long arms.Jarmin of the F was a bit shorter and got in under the shipfitter Wishard's guard to cut him down. Christensen of the 2nd and Terry of the 1st, both lightweights, and both fighters, put on some fireworks. The 2nd division's lad was a bit more classy and a bit more on the scientific side of the side. The other lad was a real slugger and gave his opponent plenty to think over in the first round and a half. It was in the last of the second that he went into the ropes and nearly took a count. Then the third came along and they went out there to do or die. Perry was a game lad but the boy from the second came in under his wild swings and, having got the range was soon the winner by a knockout. Then we had Kendzor, C&N, and Brown, E division, up for a bout. Kendzor led most of the way in this one, and Brown fought on the defensive side. Brown had a snaky right that he got in several times and which bothered the radio striker a lot. It was a steady barrage of punches that the blond lad from the comm deck kept coming which won him the fight by a decision. Next on the Program came Aubin, from the Bake Shop, representing the S, and Mitchell, another lad from the C&N. It was almost over before (Continued on page 4.) The Falling Of The Marine Twelve noon it be, let's get some chow. (First come first served had been the rule.) Last first, first last the rule is now. Howls were heard and turmoil reigned. Epithets extreme profane. 39 degrees then it was, A mighty roll in suds and fuzz. The chairs broke loose to go A sliding fast, to and fro. Tables too. I thought I'd die For then went up a sound on high. In with chairs, food, and wreck One staunch marine had hit the deck. A History Of The Pineapple Early Spanish and Portuguese explorers are said to have found the pineapple both cultivated and growing wild in the West Indies, but its original home is said to have been Brazil. Its name is derived from the Spanish word Pina because of its resemblance to the pine tree cone. The first mention of the pineapple is found in the statement by Peter Martyr that Christopher Columbus and his companions saw it at Quadalupe in 1493. The first picture of this fruit comes from the Universal History of India (meaning the new world), by Father Oviedo, a Jesuit missionary, in his book published in 1535. In 1555 Jean de Lery, the first Protestant minister to preach on the American continent describes the pineapple as "a fruit worthy of the gods and of such excellence that it should be picked only by the hands of Venus." How the plant first got to the Hawaiian Islands is not definitely known. Some believe that they were first washed ashore from ship wrecked Spanish vessels, while others contend that traders and whalers brought them. The first written record was from the diary of a Spaniard, Don Francisco di Paula y Marin, who lived on the Island of Hawaii, dated in 1813. The early pineapples were found to be growing wild but this variety was small, acid and filled with woody fibre. The native Hawaiians called them Halakahiki which translated means foreign screwpine, and contemptuously referred to as just another strange food served to tourists. In 1882 Captain Kidwell, an English horticulturist, imported from Jamaica a variety grown there, known as the smooth Cayenne, which proved so successful that they (Continued on page 4.)