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1940-11-13
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1940-11-13 - Page 1. November 13, 1940. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1145/show/1141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(November 13, 1940). 1940-11-13 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1145/show/1141

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

1940-11-13 - Page 1, November 13, 1940, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1145/show/1141.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 1940-11-13
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Date November 13, 1940
Description Volume 3, Number 13
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Enroute Manila, Philippines
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 6
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0740_L.pdf
Transcript Volume 3, Number 13 ................................. -- ----~ --::- ) U~ S<. S~ HOUSTON Enroute Manila, P. I. 13 November, 1940. GUAM By R. C. Ayers, CQM The Marianas Islands lie north of the Carolines and consist of a chain of steep volcanic islands extending for a ", distance of 380 miles. They were formerly known as the Ladrones, the name given to them by the Spaniards when they colonized the islands. Those southward of Farallon De Med­inilla have sandy beaches, and the hite andy - bottoms ca usua1ly be­seen to a depth of 16 fathoms. Those to the northward have a dark gray sand, and the bottom cannot be seen through a greater depth than 5' h fathoms. The Marianas, with the ex­ception of Guam, lie within the Japanese Mandate. The Branch Office of the South Sea Pre{ ectural Govern­ment is located at Saian. Guam is a United States possession. The origi­nal inhabitants of the Islands were Chamorros, of whom there were about 100,000 at the time of discovery. These have gradually diminished in number, however, and at a later period the islands were colonized with Kanakas from the Carolines, who now constitute about one third of the pop­ulation. The island of Guam is the southernmost, largest, and most pop­ulous island of the Marianas. It is 26 miles long in north- northeast and south- southwest direction, 4 to 8 miles wide, and had a population of 25,496 in 1936. At a distance this is­land appears flat and even. Its east­ern side is bordered with steep cliffs and exposed to the ocean swell. The northern end of the island is compar­atively low, Santa Rosa, about ' 870 feet above high water, being the high­est elevation, To the Southward it is more mountainous, Mount Tenjo WARNI G If your lips would keep from slips, five things observe with care. Of whom you speak, to whom you speak, and how and when and where, If you your ears would save from jeers, these things keep- meektY' 11l , Myself and I, and mine and my, and how I do and did. forming several peaks of about 1,000 feet, and others near the southern end about 1,100 to 1,300 feet above high water. The western side has many small bays divided by rocky points. A large part of the coast is fringed by reefs which are dry in places. Near the middle of the is­land in the immediate vicinity of Agana there is a large spring from which a copious supply of water is­sues; this, after passing through an extensive swamp, enters the sea, as a river, the channel of which has been artificially lengthened and turned for a mile parallel to the coast, for the convenience of the natives. The soil is dry and fertile. The principle pro­ducts are corn, copra, rice, and sugar, and there is some valuable timber. On the western side are coconut groves 3 to 4 miles long and 1 to 2 miles wide. Cattle and fowl are also raised. Fish, fruit, and vegetables are plentiful in some places. Agana is the capital of Guam and has a pop­ulation of about 10,000. Practically the only steamer communication is by Navy or Army transports calling at irregular intervals. PHILIPPINES By R. C. Ayers, CQM The Philippine Islands, situated in the northern part of the East Indian Archipelago, were brought to the notice of Europe by the Portu­gt:~ se navigator Ferdinand Magellan in 1521. Magellan, who was in com­mand of a Spanish expedition and was the first to pass through the strait still bearing his name, approached the l'hilippines from t e eastward-. ind entered the archipelago through the strait of Surigao. He was killed in a skirmish with the natives on Mac­tan Island, east of Cebu in 1521. The Philippines were formally annexed to Spain in 1565. After the war between the United States and Spain ( the Philippine Islands were ceded by Spain to the United States of America by the treaty of peace signed at Paris, Dec­ember 10, 1898, and as a voluntary consideration the United States paid to Spain $ 20,000,000. Spain also re­linquished on November 7, 1900, to the United States, all title ar. d claim to the islands of Cagayan, Sulu, Sib­utu and other islands belonging to the Philippine Archipelago and lying outside the limits described by the treaty of Paris, the United States paying the sum of $ 100,000. Palmas Island, which is within the treaty limits, was awarded to the Nether­lands by arbitration on April 4, 1928. The limits described by the treaty of Paris were changed by agreement be-tween the United States and Great Britain on January 2, 1930. According to these treaties tht: Philippine Arch­ipelago comprehends all of the is- ( Colltlllue4 on Pace 41