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1940-08-01
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1940-08-01 - Page 1. August 1, 1940. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1130/show/1126.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(August 1, 1940). 1940-08-01 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1130/show/1126

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

1940-08-01 - Page 1, August 1, 1940, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1130/show/1126.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title 1940-08-01
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Date August 1, 1940
Description Volume 3, Number 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • At Sea, Hawaiian Area
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Physical Description 1 newsletter
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 6
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
Item Description
Title Page 1
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. UH Digital Library. " To order a higher resolution reproduction, please click the "Request High Res" button at the bottom of the page.
File name _0731_L.pdf
Transcript Volume 3, Number 9 * " S. S... 0-.. 5-.- 0.. * At Sea, Hawaiian Area 1 August, 1940. TWO FOR ONE NEW EXEC. ..,.,., We'd like to say hello and a word of welcome to each new hand by name, but there have been so many lately that space won't permit it. Collectively, however, we're glad to have you for shipmates, and hope you'll have a good cruise in the Hou­ston. The same in regard to space ap­plies to those who have lately shoved off; good luck and happy landings in your new assignments. Now it need not be assumed that the young bride worships her hus­band simply because she places burnt offerings before him three times a day. - Exchange. Welcome also to Ensign Hamlin, new Fourth Division junior officer ­to Ens. Harveson, CWO on ComCru­ScoFor's Staff - and to the newly graduated and commissioned Ensigns Mallory, Hamill, Nelson, Nethken, Sellers, and Smith. Glad to have you aboard, likewise, to Lt. ( jg) Kirk­patrick, in Engineering. A belated welcome is extended to our new executive officer, Comman­der H. L. Grosskopf, and best wishes • for a happy and successful cruise. Commander Grosskopf comes to t1le Rambler ship from duty as Ord­nance Inspector with the Board of Inspection and Survey. The Comman­der is no stranger, however, having served in the Houston as First Lieut­enant, 1931- 2, when she was last on the Asiatic Station. From all reports, the Commander plays a wicked game of golf; and perhaps we may be able to count on him to steer us to a few of the bright­er spots along the Whangpoo. ...... THE VALUE OF A SMILE When I Have Done with The Navy, The Thing I'll Miss A lot Is technically Intangible; It's the sleep ( Exchange.) I never got. ---~--- It costs nothing but creates much. It enriches those who receive without impoverishing those who give. It hap­pens in a flash and the memory of it sometimes lasts forever. None are so rich that they can get along without it and none so poor but are richer for its benefits. It creates happiness in the home and fosters good will in business. Yet it cannot be bought, begged, borrowed, or stolen. It is something that is no earthly good to anybody until it is given away. If at some time you meet some one who fails to give you a smile, may I ask that you give one of your own? For none need a smile so much as those who have none left to give. Minneapolis 1 orth Star. The Blue Bonnet's Short Story Complete in this Issue. by E. C. Simmons It was the beginning of one of those sunny California days you read about in travel folders. The snowy white clouds were scattered across a pale blue sky. Cool morning breezes from the oc- an accompanied a little tang which would soon disappear with the sun's advance across the sky. Even the Pacific was calm, in harmony with the surroundings. The Long Beach Navy Landing was decorated in readiness for the day's occurrence. Flags fluttered in the breeze; red, white, and blue bunting covered the structure of the landing and gave color and foundation to Old Glory, high on the flag staff. People had begun to crowd the landing early, coming singly, in pairs, and in groups. Soon the landing was jammed with mothers, brothers, sis­ters, sweethearts, and wives, await­ing the return of the U. S. Fleet from maneuvers. June Whiteman, a native of Cali­fornia and very much at home in Long Beach, sat in Tracy's Cafe sip­ping a cup of coffee. She was 18 years old, a very beautiful brunette, and smartly dressed, so that many a second glance was turned her way. The expression on her face showed her thoughts to be many miles at sea. She, too, had good reason for a­waiting the arrival of the Fleet. Deep in thought, she was startled when a voice next to her said, " Will you pass me the sugar, please?" " Yes, of course," replied June, pushing along the sugar bowl. She turned toward the owner of the voice that had interrupted her contempla­tions, and saw a beautiful auburn­haired girl with big brown eyes, and a complexion the like of which you read about in magazines. " Are you waiting for the ships to arrive too ?", asked the red- readed girl. " Pardon me if I talk too much ( Continued on Page 3)