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The Blue Bonnet 1940-05-11
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Weiler, F. B., editor; Smeja, G. A., assistant editor; Morrison, J., assistant editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor; Hattemer, F. N., sports editor. The Blue Bonnet 1940-05-11 - Page 1. May 11, 1940. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1110/show/1106.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Weiler, F. B., editor; Smeja, G. A., assistant editor; Morrison, J., assistant editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor; Hattemer, F. N., sports editor. (May 11, 1940). The Blue Bonnet 1940-05-11 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1110/show/1106

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Weiler, F. B., editor; Smeja, G. A., assistant editor; Morrison, J., assistant editor; Bannen, W. J., associate editor; Hattemer, F. N., sports editor, The Blue Bonnet 1940-05-11 - Page 1, May 11, 1940, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1110/show/1106.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1940-05-11
Creator (Local)
  • Weiler, F. B., editor
  • Smeja, G. A., assistant editor
  • Morrison, J., assistant editor
  • Bannen, W. J., associate editor
  • Hattemer, F. N., sports editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Essy, E., circulation
  • Razlaff, T. B., printer
  • Byrne, H. G., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Pearl Harbor, Hawaii
Date May 11, 1940
Description Volume 3, Number 55
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 8
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0747_L.pdf
Transcript Volume 3, Number 55 Pearl Harbor, T. H. May 11, 1940 Travelogue ADAMS WINS FLEET TITLE ADAMS ALL NAVY 165 POUND CHAMP In the Flee boxing finals held Friday, 3 May at the Civic Auditorium, Hono­lulu, T. H., Bud Ada: ns , · lon an All Navy Championship, 165 pound class, from Maxey of the USS SAVANNAH. In the fastest and cleanest bout of the afternoon, Adams, the HOUSTON middleweight outboxed and outsmarted his opponent to win by decision. Both fought cleaniy and punched hard, but Bud was clearly the winner. Neither were ever in trouble, and yet both hit hard and fast. Although all ship's U. S. S. Baltimore personnel already knows Bud as a We have lately left Lahaina ( pro­nounced " Lahaina") on the beautiful island of Maui, and I am sure every­one enjoyed the sights of beauty and interest there - such as the comely native girls with their coal- black hair, brown skin and eyes, beautiful teeth, or tooth, narrow waists and broad areas of sugar cane and pine­apple. Southeast of Maui lies the island of Hawaii ( pronounced " How- are- ye" with an English accent and slight r.. eglect of the " y"), which is the larg­est island of the group according to its local Chamber of Commerce which Ees in the city of Hilo (" Hee- low", not " high- low"). Its chief products are pineapples, sugar cane and vol­canoes. The ukelele industry suffered a slump with the production of port­able radios. The romantic use of a ukelele obviously suffers in compar­ison with a radio that brings better music and leaves both hands free. The same considerations led me to give up the harmonica as a mood " Bringer- on­er," but I digress- the island of Ha­waii is quite large, for an island, and the city of Hilo is about medium size, comparing very favorably, they say, with Messeopolis, Kansas, in size. ( Acknowledgement is made to Bro­derick's Atlas for statistical data.) Now we come to Honolulu, capital city of the group and " Paradise of the Pacific" ( they have a Chamber of Commerce too) and, taking a leaf from Los Angeles' book, they have extended the city limits for 1500 miles, taking in Midway Island. Why anyone would want to take in Mid­way is hard to see as the goonies ( Continued on P · , ge 4) Here's a bit of interesting dope, borrowed from the " Rope Yarn", for those of you who have wondered a­bout the past of that old armor. ed cruiser that lies in Pearl Harbor. The keel of the U. S. S. Baltir\ lor3 was laid in 1887, at Cramp's Shipyard in Philadelphia, and she entered the battle line of the Navy fifty- three years ago. In 1890 she had the novel distinction of returning the body uf Ericsson to Sweden, and in 1398 fought in the battle of Manila Bay with Dewey. During the last war, she was the first American Minelayer to arrive overseas. Within six weeks, fhe had mined the North Channel of the Irish Sea, blocking the path of Ger­man U- Boats, two of which were de · stroyed by Baltimore mines. She was one of the finest cruisers of her time, a fact borne out by her subsequent career, covering four de­cades. She is 335 feet long, displaced 4400 tons, had 10,000 horsepower en­gines, and made 20 knots. She was manned by a crew of 21 officers and 340 enlisted men. Her armament originally consisted of four ( Continued on Page 4) lim clean and clever boxer, a well known Honolulu sports writer acclaimed him as the cleverest and smartest middle­weight his eyes had beheld in many a moon. When Adams leaves with the fleet, the HOUSTON will lose a great boxer and an all- round athlete. A four letter man in high school, he continued as well in the Navy. He has played baseball and basketball as well as boxed, for the last five years. When he wasn't on duty as Coxswain or Master- At- Arms, in his spare time, he wrote the sports column of the Blue Bonnet. Wherever Bud goes, the HOUSTON will always remember him as a swell shipmate and an out­standing athlete who has done a great deal in keeping the Rambler Ship in the Navy sportlight. The Captain of the Pensacola was heard to remark the other day to the ( Continued on Page 4)