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The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15
Page 2
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Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15 - Page 2. April 15, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1025/show/1022.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor. (April 15, 1939). The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1025/show/1022

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15 - Page 2, April 15, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1025/show/1022.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15
Creator (Local)
  • Johnston, J. P. M., editor
  • Leedy, W. C., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date April 15, 1939
Description Volume I, Number 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
File name _0668_L.pdf
Transcript ,\ -: THE BLUE BONNET :- Mama, That Man Again. 2 of inspection of Honolulu and Pearl Harbor. After sailing from San Die­go, staying in Honolulu for four days, and conferring with Admiral Reeves on the completion of Fleet Problem 16, the Ass't Sec. Navy finally disem­barked at San Pedro. During the summer, the Houston accompanied the rest of the Scouting Force on a cruise oJ' Alaskan ports, stopping at Cordova, Seward, and Auke Bay. The cruise was completed by short stays at Blaine and Seattle, Washington. On 3 October, 1935 the Houston again broke the flag of the President of the United States for the Second Presidential Cruise, a vacation cruise of 12,000 miles. This trip took the Chief Executive to many interesting ports, among them being Cerros Is­lands, Cape San Lucas, Magdalena Bay, Cocos Islands, Tiger Islands, and Charleston, S. C. The 29th of April, 1936 saw the Houston southbound out of San Ped­ro, stopping at Panama, and crossing the Equator on the 20th of May. It arrived at Valparaiso, Chile, 29 May and then took leave on the second of June. Long remembered by the Hou­ston crew was the big time had by all in the Chilean port. Thirteen days of steady steaming and the ship was again in Long Beach. On July 5th the Houston left for the North, visiting the following ports: Seattle and Bremerton, Wash.; Portland, Oregon; San Francisco, Calif., returning to Long Beach on the 22nd of August. April 16, 1937, we left for Fleet Problem 18, visiting the Hawaiian Is­lands and arriving in Sarr Francisco on 28 May for the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge. Many a sore foot went to bed aboard the Houston after that was over. We returned to Long Beach and after a few days visited Ventura, Calif. On the 28th of June the ship left for Astoria, Ore. From 6 of July to 11 October our ship re­mained at the N. Y. Mare Island for overhaul. We returned to Long Beach on the 12th of October, and remained in that area until Fleet Problem 19, when we again visited the Hawaiian Islands. Rush orders put the ship in the Navy Yard at Mare Island on the 6th of June where she was made ready ( Continued on Page 4.) .. 1-" History of the Houston ( Continued from Page 1.) THE BLUE BONNET Our Namesake Flower The editors and many of the Wardroom Officers saw their first bluebonnets last Saturday morning when Capt. Charles Crotty, Assistant Director of the Port of Houston, and Mr. J. L. Archer, an officer of the port, brought a whole armful of the flowers to the ship asking for the editor of this paper. The bouquet was beautiful, and the BLUE BONNET is grateful for this thoughtful expres­sion of hospitality. aboard 250 Marines to augment the 4th Regiment, Marine Expeditionary Forces, in Shanghai. On arrival, the Marine and bluejacket machine gun platoon were sent ashore for duty. On 13 March 1933, the Houston left Manila on a good will tour through the southern Philippines, vis­iting Iloilo, Cebu, Davao, Dumanqui­las Bay, and Zamboango. On 29 May 1933, a good will tour was made to Japan, visiting Yokohama and Kobe, returning to Tsingtao, China, by the way of the famous Japanese Inland Sea. On 17 November 1933, after be­ing relieved by the U. S. S. Augusta, the Houston departed from Shanghai for San Francisco, stopping at Yoko­hama enroute. After an overhaul per­iod in the Puget Sound Navy Yard, she joined the Scouting Force of the U. S. Fleet in Long Beach, California, and departed with the fleet for Atlan­tic ports. On the evening of 1 July 1934, President Roosevelt boarded the Hou­ston at Annapolis, Md., for a cruise of 11,783 miles. In company with the destroyers U. S. S. Gilmer and U. S. S. Williamson, which were later relieved by the cruiser U. S. S. New Orleans, stops were made at: Cape Haitian, Haiti; Mayaguez, P. R.; San Juan, P. R.; St. Thomas, and St. Croix, Vir­gin Islands; Cartagena, Columbia, S. America; Cristobal, and Balboa, Can­al Zone; Cocos Islands; Clipperton Is­lands; Hilo, and Honolulu, T. H.; and then Portland, Oregon, where our President and good shipmate disem­barked. On 15 May, 1935, the Houston took another member of the Roose­velt family, the late Henry L. Roose­velt, then Ass't Sec. Navy, on a tour W. C. Ridge M. A. Pipp, Yeo3c R. L. Beckwith, Seale E. Essy. Sea2c Cartoonist: Circulation Printers : Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston Assistant Editor: Ensign W. C. Leedy One man I admire, who has a fine young son seven years of age, was asked why he didn't play golf. " I want to make a pal of my son", he answered, " and I think the best way to do that is to give him some of my time to spend my week ends and free time doing the things he can do. When he is old enough to swing a golf club, then we'll play golf together." The unknown author who wrote the little ditty printed below didn't have this man in mind when he wrote it. He was thinking of that great tribe of golfers who are up at the crack of dawn and return cursing their luck at night fall. A weekly publication of the ship's com­pany of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, US. N.. Commanding and Com­mander C. A. Bailey. U. S. N., Executive Officer. "' Vho' the stranger, mother dear? Look, he knows us. Ain't he queer?" " Hush my own; don't talk so wild; He's your father, dearest child." " He's my father? 0 such thing! Father passed away last spring." " Father didn't die, you dub! Father joined a golfing club. But they clo ed the club, so he Has no place to go, you see- No place left for him to roam­That is why he's coming home. Kis him- he won't bite you, child­All them golfing guys look wild." I know. I've had the bug. Bring­ing that score down becomes an ob­session. The golf widows and orphans we leave behind us are part of the price. When the snow becomes too deep, though, we must come home, and when we do, here's the scene the rhymester paints: