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The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15
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Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15 - Page 1. April 15, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 1, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1025/show/1021.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor. (April 15, 1939). The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1025/show/1021

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15 - Page 1, April 15, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 1, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1025/show/1021.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-15
Creator (Local)
  • Johnston, J. P. M., editor
  • Leedy, W. C., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date April 15, 1939
Description Volume I, Number 9
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0667_L.pdf
Transcript Volume I, Number 9. History of the Houston The U. S. S. Houston was built at Newport, News, Va. The keel was laid in 1928 and the ship was launched on 7 September 1929, Miss Elisabeth Holcombe, of Houston, Texas, spon­sored the ship, giving her the name of that city in memory of General Houston. After commissioning in the U. S. Navy Yard on 17 June 1930, the U. S. S. Houston made a " shake down" cruise to Europe, visiting England, France, . and Holland, returning to Houston, Texas, to extend the wel­come of the Navy to the Houston's natal city. Following this memorable visit, final trials and overhauls were held, and the ship sailed for the Asia­tic Station on 14 January 1931, via the Panama Canal and Honolulu, T. H. On 22 February 1931 the Houston joined the Asiatic Fleet in Manila, P. L, and assumed her role as flagship, hoist­ing the flag of Admiral Charles B. McVay, Jr., U. S. Navy. On 20 Septem­ber 1931, she entered the Yantze Riv­er to assist, if necessary, in rescue work during one of the most devas­tating floods in the history of that famous river. The Houston went up the river about 600 miles to the city of Hakow, returning to Shanghai on 5 October 1931. While undergoing routine over­haul in the Cavite Navy Yard, Phil­ippine Islands, on the night of 31 January 1932, rush orders were re­ceived to proceed immediately to Shanghai, where hostilities had brok­en out between China and Japan. Am­erican lives and interests were en­dangered. Within a few hours the Houston was ready to sail, took ( Continued on Page 2.) Houston, Texas The Art of Wearing Phones Wearing phones is really an art which cannot be overlooked. First, let us consider the appearance of a past master when wearing phones. The mouth piece unit is properly se­cured around his neck as it should be. But there are many things that can be done to the mouthpiece proper. A rubber band, tire tape or just a rag strip can be used. You may won­der what these have to do with the mouth piece. The maestro uses these to keep his button down so that it will not be necessary to expend the effort to lift his hand and press it in when he wishes to talk, a truly great advantage, so convienient for him. It has an effect on the rest of the peo­ple on his circuit. Suppose he is in the • five- inch battery during firing. Everyone in the circuit knows just when the guns go off. Often they are talking to one another and a gun's bark is a very sharp reminder that a practice is going on that instant. He might be in a turret during loading drill waiting for someone to call him. Everything in the turret is doing fine­ly. Trays rattle and bang, breeches slam shut, bore clear whistles go, and the gun fires just after the buzzers sound. Everyone knows just what is happening. It is a fine excellent meth­od, one of the simplest, he does not have to lift his hand and press a but­ton when he wishes to talk. The ear pieces too, can be han­dled with great dexterity. If the pros­pect is that he will have to wear them for a long time, the best procedure is to place them one forward of the ear and one aft of the ear on opposite sides of the head. In this manner the ears are not pressed against the head IContinued on Page 3.) 15 April 1939. The Bluebonnet Texans' Favorite Flower A majority of the ship's com­pany may be surprised to know that their ship's paper is named after the state flower of Texas and favorite flower of all Texans- The Texas Blue­bonnet. A small species of blue lupine, the bluebonnet is scientifically called lupinus texensis. Each individual blos­som on the stalk of the flower of this low little plant resembles a bonnet. It may have been that its name " blue­bonnet" originated in early days when real bonnets were common among the women of Texas. Among the legends of the origin of the flower itself is the story of the little daughter of a Comanche chief, whose tribe and lands were visited with flood and cold, then drought, famine and death. Answering prayers of the tribe, the Great Spirit agreed to restore game animals to the land and prosperity to the people only if the tribe's most prized possession were sacrificed. To save her people, the little princess burned her own beautiful doll as this sacrifice. With its clothes of fine fawnskin and its lovely blue feather headdress, this was dearer than anything else owned by anyone of the people. Its ashes she scattered through her fingers to the four winds. Where those ashes ( Continued on Pace 4.) . 1-. What Are The Following? ( Answers on Page 4.) Ratlines Rat- tail Rising Rouse Rouse in