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The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-06
Page 2
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Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-06 - Page 2. April 6, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1020/show/1017.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor. (April 6, 1939). The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-06 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1020/show/1017

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Johnston, J. P. M., editor; Leedy, W. C., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-06 - Page 2, April 6, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1020/show/1017.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Blue Bonnet 1939-04-06
Creator (Local)
  • Johnston, J. P. M., editor
  • Leedy, W. C., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date April 6, 1939
Description Volume I, Number 8
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
File name _0665_L.pdf
Transcript 4' 1'" -: THE BLUE BONNET :- ..... All should observe Easter with attendence or observance of the Day of Resurrection. It has, through all history, been a day of rejoicing and gaiety. It began as the Festival of " Ostara" ancient Teutonic goddess of spring, which developed from pa­gan and tribal celebrations of the coming of spring and the passing of winter. In the fifteenth century the solemnity and dignity of church ser­vices was broken by the frivolity of jokes and repartee. Once in 1670 un­der Pope Clement X it was frowned upon. In England and France the Eas­ter season was celebrated by games and minor social liberties and joyous­ness. Russians and Greeks held par­ades and ceremonies in observance of Easter. The present day of Easter, the first Sunday following the Pas­chal Full Moon which happens upon or next after the 21st of March, the vernal equinox, was established in 1582 with the establishment of the Gregorian calender. The Paschal Full Moon is the 14th day of the 1st lunar month. The designation of this date was the culmination of effort com­mencing with the Council of Nicaea in 325 A. D. by the representatives of all the Christian world. Easter means one thing to us at all ages, Joy. When we are young Easter is heralded by the Sunday school teacher. We are told that it is the day on which Christ rose from the dead. But that is not what we remember. We think of Easter rab­bits, hiding in the most hidden places laying eggs of varied hue, for us to find. The finding of an Easter egg is treasure trove. As we grow older the naive enjoyment of searching for Easter eggs becomes dull and a thing of the past. With the passing of that form of greeting to spring, the an­nual rebirth of life, comes another pleasure, dressing gaily for Easter in ( Continued on Palre 4.) Gradually a trade grew which became known as the Amalgamated Sea Cooks. To be a sea cook one had to serve an apprenticeship of two round trips which in those days meant nearly two months at sea learning to cook in a galley. Cooking in a galley was most difficult and is today but in those days the ship was never on an even keel being always heeled over with the wind, to port or starboard depending upon which tack the ship was sailing. The trade was based on three lessons, corresponding to three positions of the ship: first, heeled to port; second, heeled to starboard; and third, the most difficult, when coming about. In coming about one had to learn to rapidly and smoothly without spilling a drop of water, shift from the port to the starboard method of cooking. It was an art. THE BLDE BONNET Son of a Sea Cook This nautical expression goes back to the earliest days of the clip­per ships. When the clipper shi~ s were coming into prominence for theIr great speed and comfort over other methods of ocean transportation it paid the owners to have the best cooks aboard for the mess of the pas­sengers. The skippers were har~ on these ships and drove the ship, them­selves and the crews to make a re­cord crossing. If they did not sign on it was merely a case of getting the first ten men thoroughly drunk and bringing them aboard before sailing. This method did not work with the cooks for they had to be picked men. Then only inducement that could make a man make more than one round trip was to let him have his wife aboard. ..... Once accomplished at this job a man became known as a Sea Cook, an honorable profession. When a sea cook became accustomed to a ship he knew her every move, heave and pitch and really had a sentimental attachment to her. Having his wife aboard and living on board for such long periods it often happened that a child was born when underway. The little fellow was affectionately known on board as a Son of a Sea Cook. He- Do you believe in Divorce? She- No! I believe in a fight to the finish. W. C. Ridge M. A. Pipp, Yeo3c R. L. Beckwith, Seale E. Essy, Sea2c Cartoonist : Circulation Printers: 264 Days till Christmas, no kidding! 2 " Did you ay you are subject to fits?" " Yes." " What do you do when you have one?" " Oh, just walk back and froth." A weekly publication of the ship's com­pany of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, US. N., Commanding and Com­mander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N., Executive Officer. Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston Assistant Editor: Ensign W. C. Leedy Restoration of Reenlistment Allowance Looms Probable On March 13th, the United States Senate defeated Amendment No. 17 to the Independent Offices Appropriation Bill which would have abolished reen­list~ ent allowances for service enlist­ed men. The House of Representatives had already rejected this amendment three times by a large majority, indi­cating that it was clearly opposed to further ban on reelistment allow­ances. Such bans in recent years have been enacted by " parlimentary man­euver" rather than by majority vote. Although the action of the Senate removed any mention of a ban on re­enlist allowances from this particular bill, this does not mean that attempts may not be made to attach the ban to future bills. It does mean that a wide majority of members of both the House and Senate are opposed to such a ban by itself. Unless both chambe~ s materially reverse themselves on thIS matter, it appears highly pr~ bable that reelistment allowances WIll be paid beginning July 1st. The Regular Veterans Associa­tion with the cooperation of Our Army magazine, Navy News, and o. th­ers, has taken the lead in presentmg to members of Congress the needs of service men in this instance, as well as the facts which justify the revision of pay scales recommended by the War and Navy Departments.