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The Blue Bonnet 1934-12-15
Page 2
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Berkley, J. B., editor. The Blue Bonnet 1934-12-15 - Page 2. December 15, 1934. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/102/show/99.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor. (December 15, 1934). The Blue Bonnet 1934-12-15 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/102/show/99

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Berkley, J. B., editor, The Blue Bonnet 1934-12-15 - Page 2, December 15, 1934, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/102/show/99.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1934-12-15
Creator (Local)
  • Berkley, J. B., editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Harris, D. A.
  • Botterell, R. E.
  • Brown, H. L.
  • Holt, Jack
  • Hall, A. D.
  • Post, R. W.
  • Razlaff, T. B.
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • San Francisco, California
Date December 15, 1934
Description Volume I, Number XVI
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 11, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
File Name _0062_L.pdf
Transcript Pace Two THE BLUE BONNET -: THE BLUE BONNET :- KNOWING THE NAVY. BRAIN TEASER 15 December, 1934. Lt. Ue> J. a. Berkl. y - E" itor. -: CONTlUBUTOal :- * * * PEP TALK A .. eekly publlcatl. n publl. hed by the alii..•• company of the U. S. S. BO~ STON. ea.. teln W. B. Weotla. n. U. S. N.• Com... nd. lac . n" C...... n.. er F. D. lI. noek. U. S. N.• ' lsacati... Olrleer. " Swede" Loomis, some of us will remember him, is now a Coxswain on the Bushnell. " Bluenose" Tillman, GM2c is in the Hospital in Mare Island, recovering from a bite in the arm by a tree climbing horse in the Upper Yangtze River valley. Jo Griffin, SK1c., is muchly Shore Dutying in Mare Island. " Jacki- san" Aufdenspring is now on the Whitney. He is playing Basket­ball again and received quite a good mention in San Diego sporting cir­cles for his brand of game at guard. Wetzel, exSea1c., and SM striker is now far from a bridge and Flag hoists. A job in the shipping depart­ment of San Francisco's Wolworths keeps him busy. He soon contem­plates that dive into the matrimonial sea. • I • NEWS OF FORMER SHIPMATES The following was handed in to us some time ago. Unfortunately your staff member lost the submitted puzzle and just recently found it. I imagine that Hartley, of " E" division has been wondering just what happen­ed, but now that the lost is found I'll edmit it's loss. " There is a room 30 feet long, 12 feet wide, and 12 feet high. On one - end wall, on the center line, one foot down from the overhead and six feet from each side wall, is a spider. On the opposite end wall, one foot up from the deck and .. iiix feet from each side wall is a fly. The fly remains stationary. What is theshortest possible distance that the spider must travel ( crawling all the way, no trickery, no web) to en­able him to reach the fly. Apparently 11 feet down, 30 feet across and 1 foot up or 42 feet seems the shortest route. This is not true. As a furthea hint, the spider covers five of the six room surfaces, reach­ing the fly in less than 42 feet of travel. Members of E division to whom I have illustrated this problem are requested to refrain from rendering any assistance to those desiring to try their hand at this problem." Well there it is and those who are interested in the solution, will find it by getting one copy of next week's Blue Bonnet. All others .25 Help fill your share of the quota and we can report to our CNO that the HOUSTON is right'in line as she is with everything she undertakes. • • • Special searchlights, which are not ruined when submerged to depths of over 200 feet, have been designed for submarines. The inside of the light is allowed to flood to prevent damage to the mirror and the lens. Special bulbs are made to withstand the high pressures, as ordinary incan­descentlight bulbs will break when submerged to a depth of 10 feet. • • • The custom of striking bells at sea originated in the following way: In the days before watches were worn on every wrist, the steersman used to time his tricks at the wheel with a sandglass. Due to the difficulty of steering the old windjammers, a trick was only half an hour, and each time the glass was turned a bell would be struck to- indicate the num­ber of the trick in the watch. Hence the custom of eight bells to a watch. • • • One of the greatest marine dis-asters was on the Mississippi River when on 27 April, 1865, the steam­boat Sultana blew up 7 miles above Memphis and sank with a loss of the lives of 1' 450 Union soldiers. Strange as it may seem, the Amer­ican Navy had it's origin in the Army and George Washington was it's admiral. In dire need of supplies in the fall of 1775, Admiral George Washington fitted out several vessels manned by soldiers uJlder command of Army officers, for the purpose of capturing the needed articles from the English supply ships bound forBos­ton. This soldier Navy had surpris­ing success and captured 35 prizes. • • • The Royal Savage, Flagship of Benedict Arnold's Fleet which was captured and burned' by the British in 1776, has just been salvaged from . the bottom of Lake Champlain. The ship was remarkably intact consider­ing thetime it has lain on the bottom of the lake. The keel, keelson, part of the ribs and bottom planking, and the heavy oak beams have all sur­vived the ravages of the 153 year burial. $ 2.00 1.00 .50 R. lE. Botterall. lie J. ck B. It. lie R. W. Polt. AO"' c Sic. printer Last week the editor expounded at some length on the needs of the Navy Relief Society. He did not do so just to fill his column but with dead earn­estness to impress on those, deigning to glance through his column, the need of co- operation from all hands. Of course there may be remarks that as far as certain individuals may be concerned, there is no need of the Soc­iety. But the avy Relief Society is not just for certain individuals, it is an affair of Navy 100' 10. Fund:; are needed. There are many who need assistance. The Society does not ask for much. When payday is here and your division representative asks you for your contribution, don't hesitate, be a cheerful giver as you would be to your own kin. The President of the Navy Relief Society, our Chief of Naval Operations, has asked for con­tributions as follows: Commisioned Officers Warrants and C. P. O. s $ 30 per mo. or more Monday we bid farewell to Frisco Town, homeward bound for most of us. Yet isn't San Francisco a sort of a home to us, tOO? The old- timers will remember just returned from China how good that fresh milk tasted how good it was to see real American people again. To those who have been here before, it is always a fine place to come back to. Some may prefer New York, some may prefer Seattle, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Podunk­ville, but no mater what your prefer­ence you will grant me that there is no place like San Francisco. There is only one, we have seen it, we have been entertained, we enjoyed it now we leave and bid SO LONG- see you again soon! Lt. Ue> D. A. B. rrio B. L•• r EIUe A. D. B. II Ze T. B. Rul.~.