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The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-29
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Johnston, J. P. M., editor. The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-29 - Page 1. March 29, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1015/show/1011.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Johnston, J. P. M., editor. (March 29, 1939). The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-29 - Page 1. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1015/show/1011

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Johnston, J. P. M., editor, The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-29 - Page 1, March 29, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1015/show/1011.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-29
Creator (Local)
  • Johnston, J. P. M., editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Beckwith, R. L., printer
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date March 29, 1939
Description Volume I, Number 7
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 1
File name _0661_L.pdf
Transcript Volume I, Number 7. fficers Ordered The ship is about to lose a very fine officer and one whom we all know, Lt. ( jg) E. A. McDonald. He has been aboard the ship for two years plus. He hai been very promin­e: lt in the activities of the ship, his multitudinous jobs taking in the ref­eree of boxing and wrestling matches, coach for the wrestling team, ward­room mess treasurer, editor of the ship's paper and an author. He is known from stern to stem, having started in the third division and end · ed in the first division. He will leave the ship in Guantanamo Bay after the firing of NBP for duty in Hono­lulu at the Naval Ammunition Depot, Oahu. All are sorry to see him leave but when he does our best wishes and good luck follow him. Ensign D. V. Wengrovius, now in the " F" Division, will take the first division when Lt. ( jg) E. A. McDonald leaves. Lt. ( jg) J. M. Clute joined the Houston not so long ago for tempor­ary duty pending assignment to new construction, the U. S. S. Sterrett in Charleston. At present he is in gun­nery with the five inch battery stand­ing watches in engineering. It would be nice to have him stay with us longer but he is due to leave in about a month. What Are The Following? ( Answers on page Four.) Lubber's hole Manger Margin Planking Pig Sea Pig AT SEA Houston Bids Farewell To Miami After twelve days at sea without touching a liberty port the Houston arrived at Miami. For one day we were anchored out at sea, an hour from the landing. Even at that, the port watch showed every indication of having had a fine time. Thursday we headed inland and steamed down the 30 foot deep channel 3% miles in­land to the piers of Miami. Miami greeted us with open arms supplying tickets and transportation to both the dog and race tracks. The city was most kind to the officers, treating them to dinner at the best night club and giving them lovely lady escorts for the evening. There are two facts of interest about that trip into Miami's piers. The Houston is the largest naval ship yet to come into the channel. During Thursday afternoon from one until five o'clock 4,600 visitors came aboard the Houston to see how the Navy lives. Our departure was most gay and festive. Shortly after five, Friday afternoon, the Houston backed out from the slip, turned around, and headed out the channel. For 2% miles along the County Causeway a caval­cade of cars and lines of spectators bid us farewell and wished us good luck. In fact one car keep honking its horn in code sending us this mes­sage, " C U Later 73s de WKAT." " 73" is a signal for Best Regards and Bon Voyage. Yes, all hands would like to have spent more days in Miami. .' 1 .. Flattery is 90 per cent soft soap. and soft soap is 90 per cent lye. 29 March 1939. Guantanamo During The Spanish- American War After boLtling the Spanish Fleet in Santiago Harbor, Admiral Samp­son looked around for a place where hi ships might coal or lie in safety durin/?; bad weather. A harbor of the kind needed lay forty miles to the ea t of Santiago- Guantanamo Bay. Accordingly on June 7, 1898, the Mar­blehead and Yankee proceeded to Guantanamo and took possession of the Bay. These ships shelled the Span­ish batteries and drove off a small gunboat; then they remained in the Bay until June 10 when a battalion of 600 Marines arrived to make a landing. They were supported by sev­eral ships, including the famous Ore­gon. The landing was unopposed by the Spanish and the Marines were soon ashore in camp. It was not until the next day that the Spanish began to show any opposition. Then for three days the Marines were subjected to an active fire from the brush. The Surgeon of the Command and six men were killed but the losses would have been much greater had it not been for the excep­tionally poor marksmanship of the Spaniards. The Marines were unable to silence or drive off the Spanish be­cause they were hidden in the brush. Finally it wa' decided to destroy their . base, a fort at Caimanera. The Texas steamed to within 2400 yards of the fort and soon reduced it to a heap. While on its way up the bay, the Texas struck several torpedoes but they had all been rendered ineffectual by barnacles which covered the con­tacts. With the destruction of the fort the troubles of the Marines came ( Continued on PBlre 4.)