Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-17
Page 2
File size: 596 KB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-17 - Page 2. March 17, 1939. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1010/show/1007.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor. (March 17, 1939). The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-17 - Page 2. USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1010/show/1007

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

McDonald, E. A., editor; Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor, The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-17 - Page 2, March 17, 1939, USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22/item/1010/show/1007.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title The Blue Bonnet 1939-03-17
Creator (Local)
  • McDonald, E. A., editor
  • Johnston, J. P. M., assistant editor
Contributor (Local)
  • Ridge, W. C., cartoonist
  • Pipp, M. A., circulation
  • Essy, E., printer
Publisher USS Houston (CA-30), U.S. Navy;
Place of Creation (Local)
  • At Sea
Date March 17, 1939
Description Volume I, Number 6
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Cruiser : CA-30)
Genre (AAT)
  • newsletters
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • application/pdf
Original Item Location ID 1981-001, Box 12, Folder 3
Original Collection Cruiser Houston Collection
Original Collection URL http://archon.lib.uh.edu/index.php?p=collections/controlcard&id=23
Digital Collection USS Houston Blue Bonnet Newsletters
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll22
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
Item Description
Title Page 2
File name _0659_L.pdf
Transcript What Kind of a Shipmate are YOU? A weekly publication of the ship's company of the U. S. S. Houston, Captain G. N. Barker, U. S. N., Commanding and Commander C. A. Bailey, U. S. N.• Executive Officer. Editor: Lieut. ( jg) E. A. McDonald Assistant Editor: Ensign J. P. M. Johnston Cartoonist: W. C. Ridge Circulation: M. A. Pipp. Yeo3c Printer E. Essy, Sea2c A " good shipmate", in a narrow sense of the term, might equally well be called a " regular fellow", " buddy", " pal", or what have you- just a fell­ow who is generally agreeable, who will swap yarns with you, share your joy and sorrow, stick up for you. Such friendships exist in all walks of life. But just as the ways of ships differ from those of other walks of life, so the term " good shipmate" holds a different meaning than the other appellations. In days gone by, a ship was almost a world unto itself. For long stretches of time the crew were dependent wholly upon them­selves and what was carried within their ship. In the husbanding of the ship's meager resources for living and comfort, in the sharing of the ship's work, and in the business of being generally agreeable and help­ful, the part played by each man was important to every other man. The authority of the captain closely app­roached that of a monarch. In such circumstances " good shipmate" con­veyed much the same meaning as " good citizen". Today ships are larger and fast­er, and for both reasons their crews rarely experience the same degree of separation from the world ashore as did those of old. But the difference is only one of degree. The ship of today is essentially the same as the ship of yesterday- a closely kni t community of men who are largely dependent upon themselves for the necessities as well as the amenities Look about you and see in how many ways the true concept of being a good shipmate can be violated; a man tracking up newly cleaned decks with grimy shoes, or a man carrying his load with little concern for the decks, ladders, and bulkheads he is scarring or for those who will have Page 2 -: THE BLUE BONNET :- THE BLUE BONNET to mend the damage, if, indeed, it can be mended at all- a man doing a nickel's worth of job and creating a dollar's worth of mess, and leaving the mess for someone else to clean up- a man tossing his lighted cigar­ette butt away, so that it is merely a matter of chance whether it merely burns a scar in the deck, sets a boat on fire, or perhaps lands in the eyes of someone on a deck below- a man throwng food refuse on the deck, or chewing gum, to make the compart­ment insanitary and unsightly work all, and eventually unnecessary work for his shipmates. And now look at • yourself! What kind of a shipmate are you? ~ .. Policie Mullane Policie Mullane, child of scorn Grew lean while he assailed the seasons; He wept that he was ever born, And he had reasons. Policie loved the days of old When sails were white and masts were leaning The vision of a sailor bold Would set him dancing. Policie sighed for what was not, And dreamed and rested from his labors; He dreamed of brigs and dirty pots. And of his own neighbors. Policie loved the sea nymphie, Albeit he had never seen one; He would have sinned incessantly Could he have been one. Policie cursed the commonplace, And- eyed a dungaree with loath­ing; He missed the medieval grace Of iron clothing. Policie scorned the fish he sought, But sore annoyed was he without it; Policie thought, and though' 1J, and thought, And thought about it. Policie Mullane, born too late, Scratched his head and kept on thinking. Policie coughed and called it fate, And kept on drinking. With apologies to Edwin Arlington Robinson Industrial Houston ( Continued from Page 1.) than $ 200,000,000 and a daily payroll of $ 60,000. In addition to the above, there are 32 industries located on the light draft channel above the turning bas­in which have an estimated capital investment of over $ 20,000,000 and a daily payroll of approximately $ 8, 000. The record clearly discloses that Houston has made great strides to­ward the goal of leadership in the South, the survey points out. Day aft­er day and week after week the mag­nitude of Houston's development mounts. Many large industries have gone about establishing giant plants here. Notable in this list is the Champion Paper and Fibre Company's $ 3,500, 000 bleached kraft mill. Most numerous in the list of manufacturing expansions are the oil field equipment concerns. Influx of new firms has been noticable. Of course, oil field equipment is not act­ually consumed within the city, but the men who purchase these supplies maintain their headquarters here and it, therefore, is logical to build plants where the market exists, even if the merchandise is delivered elsewere. Gainful employment is supplied hundreds of persons each year. The pay checks of these workers aggre­gate more than $ 161,000,000 annually. On the wide ship channel are located nine petroleum refineries with a daily capacity of more than 200,000 barrels. All of this developement is dir­ectly attributable to the inauguration of deep water shipping racilities which affords unusually attractive transportation facilities to prospect­ive industrial enterprises. The opera­tion of traffic on the Houston ship channel and the movement of freight over the Harbor Belt Railway which has direct connections with all rail lines serving Houston, enables the ship channel industry to enjoy the unique advantages of having ocean freight transportation facilities at its front door and the service of 18 rail lines at its back door. This is of cour­se, an attractive situation for any sort of industry and has resulted in the establishment here of an except­ionally varied line of industry. - Weekly Doings in Houston