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Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. Page 38. 1870. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/63.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. (1870). Page 38. Scenes from the Middle East. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/63

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880., Page 38, 1870, Scenes from the Middle East, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/63.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Page 38
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.
Publisher London: Printed by Jas. Truscott and Son, Suffolk Lane, City.
Date 1870
Description Sinai and Jerusalem; or, Scenes from Bible Lands: Illustrated by Twelve Colored Photographic Views, Including a Panorama of Jerusalem, With Descriptive Letterpress.
Caption THE DEAD SEA. A broad, low promontory, called El-Lisan, " the Tongue," stretches northwards from its south-east angle to a distance of about five miles; and the whole section of the sea to the north of this promontory is of great depth, varying from 40 to 218 fathoms. The southern section, on the other hand, is only a* few feet deep. The extreme saltness of the water is one of its most remarkable characteristics. As compared with sea-water, it is said to be more than six times as salt, the saline matter in the water of the ocean amounting only to four per cent., whereas the water of the Dead Sea contains no less than 26^ per cent. One curious result of this saltness is its extreme buoyancy. The human body cannot possibly sink in it. A bathe in it is pleasant and refreshing, and, at the same time, most amusing. As one walks into the water, when it reaches to the Avaist, one begins to find it impossible to keep one's legs on the ground; they will rise to the surface. On beginning to sAvim, you find yourself constantly striking out your legs and arms in the air, for you float almost on the top of the water. When tired, you can lie, or sit, or place yourself in any other position without danger of sinking. But woe betide you if you get the water into mouth or eyes. I remember once, when I was bathing there, a Russian pilgrim came down to watch me, and, seeing how much I was enjoying myself, he was tempted to follow my example. But he dipped his head, poor fellow, with his mouth and eyes wide open, and soon beat a hasty retreat. Another effect of the saltness of the water is its power of preserving from decay the trunks of trees that are washed down into it by the river Jordan. Numerous trunks of pahn-trees are washed up on its shore by storms, although the palm has disappeared for many years from the valley of the Jordan. A long fine of drift wood encircles the shore, and adds to the desolation of the scene, which is further increased by the incrustation of salt caused by the evaporation of the water. The sterility which surrounds it, added to its death-like solitude, renders the name of the Dead Sea most appropriate. No vegetation is to be found, except where a brackish fountain or mountain stream creates a little thicket of tamarisk, willow, or oleander. The principal causes of the extreme saltness of the water are the salt- hills of Jebel Usdum, on the south; and the continual evaporation of the fresh water that flows in; but there are also saline springs at several points.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Palestine -- Description and travel.
  • Sinai Peninsula -- Description and travel.
  • Jerusalem -- Description and travel.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
  • Jerusalem
Language English
Physical Description 52 p., ill., XII col. plates (1 fold.), 28 cm; Purple cloth stamped in black, gold, red and green. Bevelled edges. Edges gilt.
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3601783~S11
Digital Collection Scenes from the Middle East
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name meast_201009_069.jpg
Page Sequence Number S045