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Page 25. 1870. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/45.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1870). Page 25. Scenes from the Middle East. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/45

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Page 25, 1870, Scenes from the Middle East, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/45.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Page 25
Creator (Local)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain). Committee of General Literature and Education
Publisher Jas. Truscott and Son
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1870
Description Sinai and Jerusalem; or, Scenes from Bible Lands: Illustrated by Twelve Colored Photographic Views, Including a Panorama of Jerusalem, With Descriptive Letterpress. London: Printed by Jas. Truscott and Son, Suffolk Lane, City.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Palestine--Description and travel
  • Sinai Peninsula--Description and travel
  • Jerusalem--Description and travel
  • Human geography
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
  • Jerusalem
Genre (AAT)
  • illustrated books
Language English
Physical Description 52 pages, illustrated, XII colored plates (1 fold.), 28 cm; Purple cloth stamped in black, gold, red and green. Bevelled edges. Edges gilt.
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location DS107 .H64 1870
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3601783~S11
Digital Collection Scenes from the Middle East
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File name meast_201009_053.jpg
Transcript MOUNT SINAI. best to the description of his descent, with the two tables of stone in his hands, when he heard the noise of shouting, but could not tell what it meant until he came nigh unto the camp (Exodus xxxii. 15). It is also by far the shortest road up from the plain of Er Rahah. I have often ascended it in less than an hour. The peaks of Ras Sufsafeh have been well described by Dr. Stanley, as rising like a huge altar in front of the plain, visible against the sky, in lonely grandeur, from end to end of it. It is the very image of the " Mount that might be touched," and the plain before it is not broken and uneven, and narrowly shut in, like almost all others in the Peninsula; but presents a long, retiring sweep, up which the people could " remove and stand afar off." At the bottom of the plain, about 300 yards from the actual base of the mountain, a low semi-circular hill runs across it, forming a kind of natural amphitheatre, sufficiently large to scat many thousand persons: from it the voice of a man standing in the cleft that separates the two peaks which tower above can easily be heard. The more closely one examines into the natural features of this spot, so much the more is the conviction strengthened that this can be none other but the Mount of God, from which the Law was given to the children of Israel assembled in the plain beneath. It will be seen from the picture how completely isolated the mountain is from those around it. On the left, as we view it from the plain of Er Rahah, the deep valley, in which stands the celebrated convent of St. Catherine, separates it from Jebel ed Deir; behind it, two other valleys, running east and west, divide it from a lower range; and on the right, the Wady Shireich completes its isolation. In this Wady are terraced gardens, watered by a stream, which probably was the brook descending from the Mount, into which Moses cast the dust of the Golden Calf, after he had burned it with fire, and stamped it, and ground it very small (Exodus xxxii. 20). Still further to the right runs a larger and deeper valley, the Wady Leja, which also contains a plentiful stream of water, and at its head there stands another ruined monastery. A detached mass of rock, fourteen feet high and seventeen broad, is pointed out in this valley as the Rock of Moses, from which the children of Israel were supplied with water during their wanderings in the desert. A seam, of a different coloured rock, runs
Page Sequence Number S029