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Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. Page 49. 1870. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/37.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. (1870). Page 49. Scenes from the Middle East. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/37

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880., Page 49, 1870, Scenes from the Middle East, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/37.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Page 49
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.
Publisher London: Printed by Jas. Truscott and Son, Suffolk Lane, City.
Date 1870
Description Sinai and Jerusalem; or, Scenes from Bible Lands: Illustrated by Twelve Colored Photographic Views, Including a Panorama of Jerusalem, With Descriptive Letterpress.
Caption JERUSALEM. common centre round which are gathered the different Christian Churches. Greeks, Latins, Armenians, Copts, and other rival sects, here quarrel over their various holy places and absurd traditions; and, to their shame must it be said, that the first sight which meets the eyes on entering this great Christian Church is an armed guard of Mohammedans, placed there by the Governor of Jerusalem to keep the peace amongst these Christians. Yet, hoAvever much they may quarrel in other respects, they all agree in the reverence which they attach to one little chapel, which stands under the dome in the centre of the Rotunda. Here is shown the marble slab which hides the rock-hewn tomb in which our Saviour's body Avas laid. Pilgrims, who have travelled from all parts of the world, approach it on their knees, with bared feet, and cover it with their tears and kisses. Even although we may feel some doubt as to its actually being the spot where our Lord was buried, we cannot gaze upon it, watching the reverence that is paid to it, and remembering the blood that has been shed for it, without feelings of the deepest solemnity and aAvc. The Armenians occupy the south-west quarter of Jerusalem. The ancient Mount Zion (10) and a large portion of its space is taken up by their convent buildings and garden (11). On the eastern slope of Mount Zion, and extending down into the valley of the Tyropceon, which separates it from Mount Moriah, is situated the Jewish quarter. Their miserable dwellings are crowded, and filthy beyond description ; their synagogues are wretched buildings. The contrast is, indeed, sad, betAveen the squalid misery of the Jews at present and the glory of the past, when, on the very same spot, stood the splendid palaces of their ancient monarchs. There is one other portion of the city which has as yet remained unmentioned—the " Haram Area," or Sacred Enclosure of the Mohammedans, in which stand the "Mosque El-Aksa" (5) and the "Mosque Es-Sakra " (13), or, as it is usually called, the " Mosque of Omar." Next to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, this is to us the most interesting spot in Jerusalem, since it marks the position of the ancient Mount Moriah, where Abraham offered up his son Isaac; where David built an altar on the threshing-floor of Araunah, the Jebusite, and offered sacrifices to the Lord, and called upon Him to spare Jerusalem from the destroying angel; and AAdiere, also, Solomon afterwards built the Jewish Temple.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Palestine -- Description and travel.
  • Sinai Peninsula -- Description and travel.
  • Jerusalem -- Description and travel.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
  • Jerusalem
Language English
Physical Description 52 p., ill., XII col. plates (1 fold.), 28 cm; Purple cloth stamped in black, gold, red and green. Bevelled edges. Edges gilt.
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3601783~S11
Digital Collection Scenes from the Middle East
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name meast_201009_083.jpg
Page Sequence Number S059