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Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. Page 17. 1870. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/33.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. (1870). Page 17. Scenes from the Middle East. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/33

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880., Page 17, 1870, Scenes from the Middle East, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/33.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Page 17
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.
Publisher London: Printed by Jas. Truscott and Son, Suffolk Lane, City.
Date 1870
Description Sinai and Jerusalem; or, Scenes from Bible Lands: Illustrated by Twelve Colored Photographic Views, Including a Panorama of Jerusalem, With Descriptive Letterpress.
Caption THE DESERT OF SINAI. time a foaming torrent, from eight to ten feet deep, was tearing down the valley, which was nearly 300 yards in breadth. A beautiful tamarisk wood, two miles long, was completely swept away; and hundreds of palm- trees, from the gardens of Wady Eeiran, were borne down to the sea, besides scores of sheep and goats, camels and donkeys, and even men, women, and children; for an Arab encampment, pitched a few miles above me, was overwhelmed by the flood. At half-past nine the waters were rapidly subsiding, and in the morning a quietly-flowing stream, a few inches deep, was all that remained. But the whole bed of the Wady had been changed, and a scene of devastation presented itself, such as I shall never forget. The violence of these floods results in great measure from the absence of vegetation and trees, to retard and check the streams which flow down from the mountains. When, formerly, the country was inhabited by a large population of monks and hermits, who cultivated every available spot, placing walls across the valleys, planting fruit-trees, and building reservoirs in which to store the water, it was impossible for a flood to gather force, and sweep everything before it, as it docs at the present day. It is also a well-known fact that the presence of trees produces rain; and so, doubtless, at that time the rainfall was larger, and more constant; and, consequently, the amount of vegetation far more abundant. This was, perhaps, still more the case at the time of the Exodus; for the Amalekites, the then inhabitants of the country, appear to have been to some extent an agricultural, as well as a pastoral people. There are also many other reasons for supposing that the Peninsula was in olden times far better wooded than it is now; and, with the destruction of the woods, it is easy to see that both the supply of water and the amount of pasturage must have decreased in proportion. Even now there is both more water and more vegetation than has usually been described, especially in the neighbourhood of Mount Sinai. The trees that are most common are the date-palm (of which a group is represented in the picture), the tamarisk, and the acacia. The wild palm-tree of the desert grows in groups, and generally marks the presence of water. When cultivated, and stripped of the dead leaves which hang from its trunk in its wild state, it is very fruitful; and the dates from
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Palestine -- Description and travel.
  • Sinai Peninsula -- Description and travel.
  • Jerusalem -- Description and travel.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
  • Jerusalem
Language English
Physical Description 52 p., ill., XII col. plates (1 fold.), 28 cm; Purple cloth stamped in black, gold, red and green. Bevelled edges. Edges gilt.
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3601783~S11
Digital Collection Scenes from the Middle East
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name meast_201009_044.jpg
Page Sequence Number S020