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Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. Page 47. 1870. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 11, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/103.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. (1870). Page 47. Scenes from the Middle East. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/103

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880., Page 47, 1870, Scenes from the Middle East, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 11, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/103.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Page 47
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.
Publisher London: Printed by Jas. Truscott and Son, Suffolk Lane, City.
Date 1870
Description Sinai and Jerusalem; or, Scenes from Bible Lands: Illustrated by Twelve Colored Photographic Views, Including a Panorama of Jerusalem, With Descriptive Letterpress.
Caption JERUSALEM. more probable that they mark the site of the tomb of the Empress Helena, which is mentioned by Josephus. The position of two other places of interest without the walls, on the north side of the city, are shown in the picture, viz., "The Grotto of Jeremiah " (29), which consists of a huge rude cave, excavated in the rock, connected by modern tradition with the name of the prophet, but probably in reality nothing more than a quarry, from which stone was obtained for building purposes ; and the Nebi Samwil (31), a commanding hill, on which stood the ancient Mizpeh of the tribe of Benjamin. The name Mizpeh, signifying a watch-tower, is peculiarly applicable to this hill, which affords an extensive view over the whole of the surrounding country. The valley on the western side of the city, in which are situated the upper and lower pools of Gihon, is hidden from our view; but to the south, on a portion of the Hill of Zion, which was formerly included within the walls of Jerusalem, but now stands without, is seen a cluster of buildings, which bear the name of the Tomb of David (6). This marks, probably, the true site of the Royal tombs of Judah; for although burial within the walls of their cities was forbidden by the Jews, an exception was made in the case of their kings, and we kno# that David and most of his successors were buried in Zion. Having now surveyed the surrounding country, let us turn our attention to the city itself. The first thing that strikes us is the smallness of its compass. The walls which surround the city are not much more than two miles in circumference. Formerly, doubtless, the walls extended much further to the north, and included also the whole of Mount Zion, and the spur of Ophel, on the south; but on the east and west, the valleys of the Kidron and of Gihon prevented the extension of the city in those directions. Jerusalem occupies the ridge of elevated ground which lies between those two valleys. Its walls, which follow, more or less, the inequalities of the ground, are irregular in their course, excepting on the eastern side; but, speaking in general terms, it may be described as a square, with its sides facing the four points of the compass. There are now only four gates leading into the city, which stand nearly in the centre of each of its four sides. There were formerly several other gates, but they have been walled up. The principal entrance is situated on the western side, and is called
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Palestine -- Description and travel.
  • Sinai Peninsula -- Description and travel.
  • Jerusalem -- Description and travel.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
  • Jerusalem
Language English
Physical Description 52 p., ill., XII col. plates (1 fold.), 28 cm; Purple cloth stamped in black, gold, red and green. Bevelled edges. Edges gilt.
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3601783~S11
Digital Collection Scenes from the Middle East
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name meast_201009_081.jpg
Page Sequence Number S057