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An Egyptian Temple at Philae
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An Egyptian Temple at Philae. 1870. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/1.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1870). An Egyptian Temple at Philae. Scenes from the Middle East. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/1

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

An Egyptian Temple at Philae, 1870, Scenes from the Middle East, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/1.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title An Egyptian Temple at Philae
Creator (Local)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge (Great Britain). Committee of General Literature and Education
Publisher Jas. Truscott and Son
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • London, England
Date 1870
Description Sinai and Jerusalem; or, Scenes from Bible Lands: Illustrated by Twelve Colored Photographic Views, Including a Panorama of Jerusalem, With Descriptive Letterpress. London: Printed by Jas. Truscott and Son, Suffolk Lane, City.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Palestine--Description and travel
  • Sinai Peninsula--Description and travel
  • Jerusalem--Description and travel
  • Human geography
Subject.Name (Local)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
  • Jerusalem
Genre (AAT)
  • illustrated books
Language English
Physical Description 52 pages, illustrated, XII colored plates (1 fold.), 28 cm; Purple cloth stamped in black, gold, red and green. Bevelled edges. Edges gilt.
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location DS107 .H64 1870
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b3601783~S11
Digital Collection Scenes from the Middle East
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File name meast_201009_031.jpg
Transcript AN EGYPTIAN TEMPLE AT PHILAE, THE Island of Philae, the name of which appears to be a Greek corruption of the Egyptian Pilak—" the frontier "—is situated a short distance above the first cataract of the Nile, which formed the boundary line, in ancient times, between Egypt and Ethiopia. It is celebrated for the beauty of its scenery, no less than for the ruins of its ancient temples. The waters of the Nile tear furiously down the cataracts, but above the river is broad and lake-like; and numerous islands, of strange fantastic shapes, stud its surface. On the banks huge blocks of porphyry and granite lie in wild confusion, many of them brightly polished by the action of the water, aided, probably, by the mud and sand which it carries down with it, and which render so fertile- the land that it floods. The calmness of the river, the feathery tresses of the palms, contrasting with the wildness of the surrounding rocks, and the massive walls and colonnades of the ancient temples, give a peculiar charm to the scene; and the traveller feels, as he enters Nubia, and looks down upon the island of Philae, that there was, after all, some cause for the mysterious stories which the ancient Egyptians told of the neighbouring country of Ethiopia and its inhabitants. The temple here represented, though small in size, is of beautiful proportions. It is built upon a raised platform, and the architect appears to have chosen its position so as to add to its effect when seen from the river. Neither this, nor the greate Temple of Isis, which stands on the eastern side of the island, are older than the time of the Grecian Ptolemies, by whose orders they were built in the third century before Christ. Though comparatively modern, they are, however, copies of that peculiar style of archnitecture which had belonged to former ages; and we see in them an attempt to restore the old Egyptian worship, and to revive the feelings of that ancient religion which existed long before the children of Israel went down into Egypt. During their long sojourn in that land, the Israelites did not escape
Page Sequence Number S007