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Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. Page 46. 1870. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/0.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.. (1870). Page 46. Scenes from the Middle East. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/0

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880., Page 46, 1870, Scenes from the Middle East, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11/item/0.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Page 46
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Holland, Frederick Whitmore, 1837-1880.
Publisher London: Printed by Jas. Truscott and Son, Suffolk Lane, City.
Date 1870
Description Sinai and Jerusalem; or, Scenes from Bible Lands: Illustrated by Twelve Colored Photographic Views, Including a Panorama of Jerusalem, With Descriptive Letterpress.
Caption JERUSALEM. Pillar (1). It is recorded in 2 Samuel xviii. 18, that Absalom in his lifetime reared up for himself in the King's dale a pillar, which he called after his own name, to keep his name in remembrance, because he had no son. The shape of this tomb probably suggested the idea that it was the Pillar of Absalom, but the architecture of it proves at once that this is impossible. Earther up the valley, on the western slope of the Mount of Olives, is a spot, the name of which at once attracts our attention—the Garden of Gethsemane (7). Can this, indeed, be the very garden where our Saviour endured that terrible agony before His betrayal, when " His sweat was as it were great drops of blood falling down to the ground " ? If not here, the very spot cannot have been far distant; and tradition of many hundred years' age has stamped this garden with a sanctity which cannot fail to impress the minds of all who visit it. The square enclosure, surrounded by high white walls, contains a little garden, neatly kept by the Latin monks, to whom it belongs. The spreading branches of eight venerable olive-trees, whose decayed trunks attest their great age, overhang the roses and other flowers which adorn the borders. The monks, of course, are ready here, as elsewhere, to point out the exact spot where each special incident connected with our Saviour's agony took place. But the contemplation of the simple garden, with its aged trees, is to us far more impressive than the sight of this or that holy place, the situation of which is often based on traditions of no authority whatever. Such a holy place is the Tomb of the Virgin (15), which is marked in the picture, a short distance to the right of the Garden of Gethsemane, close by the Bridge of the Kidron (16), over which runs the road that leads down from Jerusalem to Bethany and Jericho. As we ascend the "Valley of Jehoshaphat," it becomes broader and less deep. To the north of the city it sweeps round in a westerly direction, and near its head are situated the so-called " Tombs of the Kings " (30). In these tombs, which consist of several chambers, each containing recesses for the dead, some richly-sculptured marble sarcophagi were found; and these, together with the care with which the vaults had evidently been hewn out of the rock, and the beauty of the sculptured frieze and cornice which extend over the front of the vestibule, led to the supposition that they were the Royal tombs of the Kings of Judah. This supposition, however, is now generally believed to be erroneous; and it appears to be
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Palestine -- Description and travel.
  • Sinai Peninsula -- Description and travel.
  • Jerusalem -- Description and travel.
Subject.Geographic (TGN)
  • Palestine
  • Sinai Peninsula
  • Jerusalem
Language English
Physical Description 52 p., ill., XII col. plates (1 fold.), 28 cm; Purple cloth stamped in black, gold, red and green. Bevelled edges. Edges gilt.
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Original Item Location http://library.uh.edu/record=b3601783~S11
Digital Collection Scenes from the Middle East
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name meast_201009_080.jpg
Page Sequence Number S056