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The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices
Pages 13 and 14
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The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices - Pages 13 and 14. 1929. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/131/show/119.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1929). The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices - Pages 13 and 14. Houston the Magnolia City. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/131/show/119

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices - Pages 13 and 14, 1929, Houston the Magnolia City, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/131/show/119.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices
Publisher Jesse H. Jones & Co.
Date 1929
Description 33 page pamphlet describing the thirty-five floor Gulf Building, built by Jesse H. Jones and Co. for the National Bank of Commerce. Ground breaking ceremonies started in the summer of 1927 and the first tenants, Sakowiz Brothers, were able to move in to the building on April 16, 1929. The pamphlet includes a history of the building and several color illustrations of the interior and exterior of the Gulf Building.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Tex.)--Buildings, structures, etc.--Pictorial works.
  • Buildings
  • Banks and banking
  • Skyscrapers
  • Designs and plans
  • Bank buildings
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Buildings
  • Banks
Subject.Topical (AAT)
  • skyscrapers
  • architectural drawings
  • banks (buildings)
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Jones, Jesse H. (Jesse Holman), 1874-1956
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location NA6233.H68 G84 1929
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2961059~S11
Digital Collection Houston the Magnolia City
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 13 and 14
Description Left Page: The Accomplishment, cont. Right page: The Accomplishment, cont.
Caption Caption: "Decorative Feature of Lobby"; Caption: "Houston's Official Air Beacon"
File name magno_201009_004j.jpg
Transcript de Salernes French marble and the walls and columns are of Siena travertine, an Italian product. Flanking the long sides of the lobby are eight mural panels illustrating the history of Texas, executed in wet fresco. The subjects are: Aboriginal Indians, circa 1500; Landing of La Salle, Matagorda Bay, 1685; Spanish Domination, 1770; Mexican Ascendancy, 1821; The Fall of the Alamo, 1836; Capture of Santa Anna, 1836; Houston, Capital of the Republic of Texas, 1837, and Modern Houston. This method of decoration has become a lost art in America, although there has been considerable interest in its revival during the past year. All of the work in these panels was executed at the building on wet plaster, a small section at a time, similarly to the work done on all of the original Italian frescoes, including such famous paintings as "The Last Supper." The paint applied to wet plaster is absorbed into the laster in such a manner that the color becomes an integral part of the material. It is permanent and indestructible. Doors leading into the banking room, elevators and shops and all radiator-enclosing grilles are unusual examples of metal-craft art done in Benedict nicke,. Concealed lighting illuminates the fresco panels, while suspended fixtures of Benedict nickel and etched glass lend themselves as ornaments in the general scheme of illumination. To the left on entering the lobby of the main building, one finds two banks of elevators: one set of four rising to the seventeenth floor, the other four operating to the thirty-fourth floor. These elevators, which are of most modern design, rise at the rate of nine hundred feet per minuted. The doors overdoor ad frame are of nickel, richly ornamented with elaborate designs in etched and band chased metal work. The cabs are of English harewood panels, framed with nickel and ornamented with grilles of the same metal. There are a total of fourteen elevators in the building, including those in the banking rooms, stores and service lifts. Typical office floors have elevator lobbies with marble walls and rubber tile floors, the corridors have the same floor and marble base with doors and trim of select gumwood brought to furniture polish. Access to the observation tower on the roof is by means of a metal and marble staircase. On this is located a powerful telescope through which Galveston and the surrounding territory may be viewed on a clear day. Visitors are admitted during daylight hours. Four hundred fifty feet above the street level is mounted the Jesse H. Jones Aeronautical Beacon. This is the Houston air mail beacon authorized and approved by the United States Department of Commerce. Utilizing twenty-three thousand candle power, this light is visible on clear nights for a distance of fifty miles. Two shafts of light are incorporated into the scheme, one of fifteen thousand candle power, pointing vetically into the heavans and nother of eight thousand candle power, sending a horizontal beam toward the Houston Airport. The searchlights are equipped with an automatic device which changes globes in case burned-out filaments, so that light is constant between sunspet and surnise. The general arrangement of exterior floodlighting for the edifice utilizes two hundred thirty-two projectors distributed between the the twenty-second floor and the top of the building, bathing it in a clear white light which rings into strong contrast tefthe carvings and ornamentation of the upper thirteen stories of the structure. The whole plan provides for a distribution of twelve million six hundred thousand candle power.