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The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices
Pages 9 and 10
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The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices - Pages 9 and 10. 1929. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/131/show/117.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1929). The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices - Pages 9 and 10. Houston the Magnolia City. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/131/show/117

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices - Pages 9 and 10, 1929, Houston the Magnolia City, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/131/show/117.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title The Gulf Building: Thirty-five Floors, One Thousand Offices
Publisher Jesse H. Jones & Co.
Date 1929
Description 33 page pamphlet describing the thirty-five floor Gulf Building, built by Jesse H. Jones and Co. for the National Bank of Commerce. Ground breaking ceremonies started in the summer of 1927 and the first tenants, Sakowiz Brothers, were able to move in to the building on April 16, 1929. The pamphlet includes a history of the building and several color illustrations of the interior and exterior of the Gulf Building.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Tex.)--Buildings, structures, etc.--Pictorial works.
  • Buildings
  • Banks and banking
  • Skyscrapers
  • Designs and plans
  • Bank buildings
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Buildings
  • Banks
Subject.Topical (AAT)
  • skyscrapers
  • architectural drawings
  • banks (buildings)
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • Jones, Jesse H. (Jesse Holman), 1874-1956
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location NA6233.H68 G84 1929
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2961059~S11
Digital Collection Houston the Magnolia City
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 9 and 10
Description Left page: The Need, cont. Right page: The Need, cont.
Caption Caption: "The Building 'Comparable with Any'"; Caption: The Exterior Development and Design"
File name magno_201009_004h.jpg
Transcript At this time, The Gulf Oil Companies which had their origin in Port Arthur, Texas, were seeking, owing to expansion, for the eighth time in their business life, new and larger offices. The two needs coincided, and Mr. Jesse H. Jones chose to offer at once asuitable home for the National Bank of Commerce, of which he is president, and adequate offices foThe Gulf Companies. Thus is the need for, and planning of, the Gulf Building evidenced. Immediately after the requirements of the Bank and Gulf companies had been established architects were started at the work of preparing models and plans for the new structure. One thing was clearly defined by the builder...the building was to be modern... daring in architectural design and planned for most efficient and economical use of office space. It must also be beautiful...in short, a building that would be outstanding in company with famed structures of the world. How completely these aims were accomplished is shown in this book. For months ateliers of the world were combed for workmanship deemed worthy of a place in the structure. From all of America and Europe the finest in architectural beauty was viewed. Numerous models were fabricated and plans drawn, until at last there issued from the workrooms of the architects sa design which combined the most modern in scheme with the most artistic in effect. The edifice had been conveived. Contracts were immediately let and ground was broken late in the summer of 1927. For weeks the rumble of great motor trucks blended with the shrill whistle of excavating machines and the blast of powder as the foundation pit was sunk deeper and deeper into the ground. Mixers dumped load upon load of concrete into the hole and suddenly, like magic it seemed, on February 16, 1928, steel beams pointed their prophetic fingers cloudward as hardfisted ironworkers added their courage and skill to the training and art of executives and architects who had visioned and planned. Steel rose rapidly and on June 4, 1928, the first brick was laid in the walls of the structure. An army of workers employed, on November 26th masonry was "topped in" and, excepting windows and ornamentation, woutwardly the tower was complete. Work of finishing the interior was rapid and on Tuesday, April 16, 1929, every tenant who had engaged space in the tower was at work in his new business home, except the National Bank of Commerce, whose quarters had been used as a workroom. The general scheme of the building is a thirty-story shaft resting upon the center of a six-story base, the large scale of which gives the impression of strength needed to support the great weight above. Masonry masses of the base are simple, broad structural forms, the sturdiness accentuated by strong contrasts and occasional carving or rich ornamental ironwork. The main shaft, which terminates in three setbacks, is a frank expression of modern provision for an abundance of light and air. There is no elaborate decoration or classic detail added, the design depending for its success upon studied proportions and balance of masses so tied together as to create a feeling taht each part fits securely into the whole rather than a group of masses piled one atop the other. The restrained ornamentation is modern and has been handled to accentuate the strength of the composition.