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Industrial Advantages of Houston
Pages 32 and 33
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Industrial Advantages of Houston - Pages 32 and 33. July 1923. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/109/show/98.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(July 1923). Industrial Advantages of Houston - Pages 32 and 33. Houston the Magnolia City. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/109/show/98

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Industrial Advantages of Houston - Pages 32 and 33, July 1923, Houston the Magnolia City, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1/item/109/show/98.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Industrial Advantages of Houston
Publisher Chamber of Commerce
Date July 1923
Description 52 Page pamphlet put out on July, 1923 by the Houston Chamber of Commerce to illustrate the many reasons Houston is the Industrial Capital of Texas and the Southwest.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • Houston (Tex.)--Commerce--Periodicals.
  • Industry & trade summary
  • Business
  • Skyscrapers
  • Buildings
  • Factories
  • Dwellings
Subject.Topical (TGM-1)
  • Industry
  • Business & finance
  • Skyscrapers
Subject.Topical (AAT)
  • buildings (structures)
  • factories
  • houses
Genre (AAT)
  • pamphlets
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Image
Original Item Location F394.H84 I53 1923
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b2964297~S11
Digital Collection Houston the Magnolia City
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/p15195coll1
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Pages 32 and 33
Description Left page: Business of the Port, Includes chart showing tonnage and value of traffic through Houston Port for the years 1919-1922. Includes chart showing Exportation of Cotton for year 1919-1922 Right page: Map of the Houston Ship Channel and Galveston Bay.
File name magno_201009_003ar.jpg
Transcript Business of the Port Comparative statement showing the tonnage and value of imports, exports, coastwise and local traffic through Houston's port for the calendar years 1919, 1920, 19212, 1922. 1919 1920 1921 1922 Tons Value Tons Value Tons Value Tons Value Foreign Imports......... 12,845 $1,406,778 298,662 $3,504,397 227,254 $3,302,271 391,517 $4,226,148 Foreign Exports......... 13, 673 8,246,436 215,913 45,092,146 318,092 48,827,043 537,617 986,893,152 Coastwise, Inbounds...... 162,234 52,588,291 149,375 22,061,296 213,509 12,461,775 234,131 20,871,247 Coastwise, Outbound..... 141,933 1,323,320 140,671 2,309,405 637,583 9,286,246 864,622 14,969,073 Local Traffic............ 841,287 21,470,009 495,583 9,333,918 1,440,911 5,086,053 1,337,708 7,313,280 Totals.......... 1,287,972 $85,034,834 1,210,204 $82,301,162 2,837,349 $78,963,388 3,365,635 $144,272,900 Note: Increase in tonnage for 1922 as compared with 1919 was 355 percent; the increase of 1922 over 1921 was 45 percent. Exportation of Cotton 1919..................................................43,341 Bales 1920..................................................275,879 Bales 1921..................................................445,015 Bales 1922..................................................771,894 Bales Destinations Served Regular steamship service is maintained from the Port of Houston to the folowing foreign ports: Liverpool, Manchester, Hamburg, Bremen, Havre, Ghent, Antwerp, Barcelona, Tampico, Vera Cruz, Havana, Porto Rico, Cuba, and other West Indian ports, Santos and other South American ports, and ports of Australia. Regular sailings are made between the Port of Houston and the following coastwise points: Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pacific Coast points, New Orleans, and oil tanker lines to points on the Atlantic Seaboard. The Interstate Commerce Commission has recently ruled that the Morgan Line may operate vessels between Port Houston and New York and other Atlantic Seaboard points. From the Turning Basin at Houston to the open Gulf the ship channel is approximately 50 miles long. Dredging work by the United States government now nearing completion will provide a ruling depth of 30 feet and bottom width of 150 feet. This waterway will accomodate the largest vessels calling at ports of the Gulf. Wharf, dock and other terminal facilities at the Turning Basin and at Manchester are municipally owned but operated by the harris County Navigation and Canal Commission composed of representatives from the city and country. These facilities include eight wharves and distributing warehouses, a wharf and warehouse at Manchester, handling devises, coal and oil bunkering plants, all of the most modern construction, and ample rail trackage. A number of oil refineries and cotton compresses have their own wharves and other shipping facilities and several million dollars worth of additional private improvements on the water front, have been announced. In December, 1922, the citizens of the county approved the expenditure of $4,000,000 for additional terminal facilities. These will include wharves, warehouses, rail trackage and a publicy owned elevator with grain.