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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
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Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 001. 1982-05-14. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/916.

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(1982-05-14). Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/916

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982 - File 001, 1982-05-14, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/945/show/916.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 81, May 14, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date May 14, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Toby Marotta's new book, 'Sons of Harvard' Books page8 v 0 I c E The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #81, Published Weekly Friday May 14 1982 Good Evening Montrose wea ther toni&ht: Partly cloudy and mild with a low of 67'. ~~'dr;'~~ ~~":.;3;2:~h ~Wfl. Suneet 8:08PM. The Montrose Symphonic Band: Lots of practice, drilling paying off Montrose Live, page 15 Mayor wants city to have more muscle in closing 'modeling studios' in Montrose Montrose News, page3 Nebraska voters reiect gay rights ordinance News, page3 Galleon, Dirty Sally's stay on top in softball rankings Sports, page 7 2 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 ~ Numbers2 The Place to be for the Best in Live Entertainment This Sunday, May 16 Sunday, May 23 RJ Productions presents "Production #'s '82" A Sunday Extravaganza PETE SHELLEY Saturday, May 29 May Theme Party "Celestial Fantasy" Coming, Sunday, May 30 Open Wednesday-Sunday Viola Wills 526-6551 pr< of Montrose News MAY 14, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Mayor to get tough with 'massage par lours' and 'modeling studios' in Montrose Mayor Kathy Whitmire says she is ready to add muscle to police efforts to clamp down on the proliferation of sexually­orient. l.!d businesses in Houston, the major­ity of which are located in Montrose. She said May II that she is seeking help from the Harris County government to file public nuisance lawsuits against such businesses. Harris County has been more successful than the City of Houston in closing these establishments in the past. Mrs. Whitmire also said she is adding three more attorneys to the city's legal department to work exclusively on enforc­ing existing laws directed at sexually­oriented businesses. All the businesses being targeted are heterosexual establishments and include about a dozen on the "Westheimer Strip," a ten·block stretch from Bagby to Montrose. County Attorney Mike DriscoU was quoted in news reports as saying his office is working with the city "to use our author­ity under state law to padlock" these establishments. The county government has tradition­ally not enforced its laws on this subject within the city limits of Houston, leaving the city to enforce its own laws, but an attorney in the city's Legal Department said there's no reason the county couldn't enforce its laws within the city limits, since Houston is part of Harris County. The city and county Jaws on regulating sexually-oriented businesses a re similar, except the city law requires the city to prove ownership, something that owners of the massage parlors and other busi-nesses make difficult by frequent selling, sometimes to vagrants off the street, and by setting up strings of corporations. Mayor Whitmire lives in Montrose. and her home is only a few blocks from a nude modeling studio on West Alabama. Booklet released by League of Women Voters The League of Women Voters of Houston has announced the release of a booklet entitled "Women Under Texas Law," The publication. written by Lavora Spradlin Arizaga, a Houston attorney and director of the League of Women Voters of Texas, covers property rights, marriage, divorce, parent-child relationships, and domestic violence. Describing it as the most informative yet concise and clear writing available today on the subject of women and their legal rights in Texas, Ellen Solender, Prof· fesor of Law at SMU said, "This booklet is a good way for women to learn their rights." The booklet, which costs $2.50, may be purchased from the League of Women Voters of Houston, 1947 West Gray. Interact to hold forum on gay religious groups lnteract's Educational Forum on Thurs­day, May 20, is to focus on the role of the "Gay Identified Organizations in Main· line Religious Denominations," the orga· nization announced. The panel presentation is to begin at 7:30 p.m . at 3405 Mulberry and is to include representatives from Lutherans Concerned, Aytz Chayim, Episcopa] In tegrity and Dignity. In teract spokesperson Carl Owens said, in a prepared press release, "Many of Houston's gays and lesbians have formed special groups within their congregations. This forum will be a discussion about the8e group's roles within the structure of their denominations and congregations." The monthly educational forums are an activity of Interact, known officially as V H Inc., a nonprofit educational and ser­vice organization. The forums are free and open to the public, they said. Voters reject gay rights ordinance Voters in Lincoln, Nebraska. May 11 rejected by a 4·to-1 margin a proposed ordi­nance that would have expanded local anti-discrimination ordinances to include gay people. The measure sought to add sexual orien­tation to the list of classifications, such as race, creed and gender, protected from dis­crimination in employment and housing. The vote was 37,249 to 10,419. Turnout was moderate as voters were also selecting Democratic and GOP gubernatorial nominees. Lincoln is the capital of Nebraska with a population of 150,000. A similar gay rights measure passed earlier this year in Austin, the capital of Texas, but which is a larger, more liberal college city. Gumshoe vs. gum mouth Pacific New• Servict! PoliC'e Chief Mike Prather has quit his job in Grove, Oklahoma, after the city council refused to back his efforts to put some "teeth" into law enforcement. The trouble began when the chief ordered one of his sergean~ to wear his dentureA to work. When the officer ignored tht" ordf>r, he was demoted, only to ht- rein· stated by the city council. "!didn't have the support of the board," the chief says, "So I resigned." Montrose Mouth Fried chicken Kentucky Fried Chicken is about to open on Montrose Blvd. at the old Church's Fried Chicken location. Church's there folded and it's no wonder. Their service (attitude of employees toward customers) was almost as bad as Del Taco's on Rich· mond used to be-or as Popeye's on Fannin is still. No, we take that back. No one has service and employee attitude as bad as Popeye's on Fannin. The Mouth understands, from friends of the Popeye's home office people in New Orleans. that the Houston locations are franchises, but nevertheless the home office has been asked to take a look at employee's attitudes at the Houston 1ocations. Now back to Kentucky Fried Chicken. If they manage their Mon­trose Blvd. location like their Shep­herd Drive restaurant, they'll be first class. The people are friendly; the ser­vice is fast. And if it ain't, the Mouth will let you know. Speaking of restaurants, the dispute between P ete St. George of the Bruserie restaurant on West Ala­bama and Cary Pasternak of Pu­ternak' 1 G r ocer y next door continu~. Pete rents (or was renting) the restaurant apace from Cary, and claims he's being improperly evicted. Cary says Pete's lease has expired and he wants a different tennant. It's before a judge now. But mean­while, Pete's other restaurant, The Banniater on Weatheimer, has been converted. into the Braaserie Too, hoping to get his old original Bras· serie crowd there, since the original BraSBerie. as of this writing, is "'closed for remodeling.'" La.st weekend's Mr. Gay Houston contest at Chases attracted hundred• for the first time to the club. Chases normal policy-so far-has been similar to that of several East Coast discos: high cover charge but free drinks. The net result being, if you're a heavy drinker, a better deal. If not a heavy drinker, then it's not a better deal than dance bars with lower or no cover charges, but also no free drinks. Now if you 're a beer drinker, at Chases you'll be consuming an awful Jot of those h.lY bttty bottles of Lite in order to get your "money's worth." This weekend marks the second annual Bivouac Party on the Rue· sian River in northern California, an event that attract.a people from across the U.S. The MontroAe Voice faces the Mon­trose Mining Company this Sun­day, 6:00 p.m., in MSA softball action, and Mining Company manager Ran­dolph Parks and Voice publisher Henry McClure have a little side bet going. If the Voice beats the Mining Com· pany, the entire Voice softball team gets "a night of entertainment you won't soon forget" on the house at the Mining Company later that evening. Said Henry, "We certainly look for· ward to collecting on this bet Sunday. We're gonna whup their asses soundly and expect to be real thirsty afterward." What if the Mining Company wins? Well Henry, during an obvious lapse in his mental facilities, has agreed to purchase a full page in the Voice him­self so that the Mining Company can do aome bragging. Said Randolph. •And we do look for· ward to bragging about our certain victory over the Voice-in the Voice." 4 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 We can't say anything original about this trio that the 'Grapevine' hasn't maintained since their last appearance. If anyone can be accredited for the fine talents we now enjoy in Montrose, it's the people who opened our eyes to true cabaret entertainment and opened our hearts to share their visions. Beginning Tuesday, June First Ruth Hastings & Co. Restaurant & Cabaret 402 Lovett, 527-9866 Dinner reservations suggested, as are the shrimp provencale, veal chops, and chicken pablo, for a delightful swnmer evening. !'( Mi Su "lh"•' Na II>• !()( Ad Uoa' • OneYearAgo May 14, 198/ · Three charged in grocery store holdup ring Two Montrose men and a southwest Houston man were charged in connection with a strong of about 30 grocery store robberiee. They were identified as Thomas Catalano, 22, of 1656 Harold and Douglas Darrell Mos· ier, 22, of 1522 California, both of Montrose, May 15, 1981. James Robison in debt, cut back ministry Jamee Robison, one of the more vocal anti­gay televieion ministers, was hurting and cutting his eta.ff down by about a third, a epokesman said. May /8, 1981 Supreme Court upheld decriminalization of sodomy in New York The U.S. Supreme Court left intact a New York state ruling, without comment, that declared a New York state anti-sodomy Jaw unconstitutional. May 19, /981 Lalor appreciation party held Houston City Councilman Lance Lalor, rep· resenting Montrose, was guest of honor a tan ''appreciation party" and fund-raiser at the Brazoe River Bottom, a gay Houston country club. Montrose Voice the new1paper of Montroee 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Content. copyright C 1982 Office hours: lOam~pm Henry McClurg publiaher/editor Billie Duncan entertainment,. tof)(>rla editor Ed Martinez reporter-at-large Nike Fede review1 Acel Clark graphica William Marberry advertising director Randy Brown advertising David Petluck advertising Lyt Harrie advertising Member Gay Preas Aaeociation Texas Gar Newe N,eociation New• &ruice• Internalional Gay New1 Agency Pacific Newa Service Syndicated Feature Seruices & Writera (San Francieco) Chronic1e Feature. United Feature Syndicate Jeffrey Wilson Randy Alfred Stonewall Feature Syndicate Brian McNaught Kurt Erichsen POSTMASTER: Send addreu correction1to3317 Mont:roee #306, Houeton, TX 77006 Subemption rate in US: $49 per year (52 iHue1), $29 JWI' 1ix month• (26 i .. ues), or Sl.25 per week Oen than 26 iNUN). National adverti1in1 representative: Joe DiS.bato, Rivendell Marketin1. 666 6th Avenue, New York 10011, (212) 242-6863 Adverti•in1 deadline: Each Tueeday, 6:00pm, for ialue relea.ed each Friday everuna MAY 14, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Chicago disco to close International Gay New• Aaency CHICAGO-The Midwest's oldest and longest-running gay disco will become a victim of the wrecker'• ball the first week in June, ending nine years of entertainment. Dugan's Bistro, according to an announcement from one of the owners, will make way for Chicago's North Loop redevelopment project. The Bistro will close nine years to the day after it opened, May 31, 1973. During its life it hosted gay people and visiting celebrities, including Bette Midler, Sena­tor Edward Kennedy, Rudolph Nuryev and Barry Manilow. The owner said that he plans to open a new bar/ballroom/restaurant called Par­adise Island at a different location. How about a nuclear war? Uncle Sam wants to know what the public thinks about nuclear war and civil defense. The Federal Emergency Management Agency has requested approval to send out thousands of queetionnaires, ask.mg whether the public thinks the government has adequate civil defence plans. The poll, according to a story in the Washington Post, will also seek opinions on the recentJy announced idea of evacuat­ing urban residents to rural areas in case of a nuclear attack. That's not all the government is curious about. The Pentagon has hired a private corporation to go through back issues of the British Economist magazine and the French newspaper Le Monde. The idea, according to the Defense department, is to see how they have projected the strategic arms balance since 1979. A apokesman said a similar study was helpful in determining what the "upper­level elite" in Britain and France think of the arms situation. You light up my cuff If you've got time on your hands and money to burn, we've got just the item for you: a "smoker quartz," a combination watch and cigarette lighter. For just $24, reports the Chicago Trib­une, you can find out the right time and maybe set your sleeve on fire also. Scenes from last U!Pek's Galleon vs. the &rn softball game, which the Galleon won, 30-JO. &•story page 7. Advertisera in the Montrose Voice: Clubo Baja's, 402 Lovett, 527 -9866 The Barn, 710 Pacific, 528-9427 Briar Patch, 2294 W. Holcombe, 665-9678 The Deep, Grant at Jackson, 528-8234 E/J's, 1213 Richmond, 527-9071 The Galleon, 2303 Richmond, 522-7616 G.B.I., 1419 Richmond, 528-8903 Grant Street Station, 91! Fairview, 528-8342 Happy Trails Membership Club, 715 Fairview, 521-2792 Hole. 109 Tuam, 528-9066, Keyboard, 3012 Milam, 528-8988 Lampost, 2417 Times Blvd, 528-8921 Mary's, 1022 Weotheimer, 528-8851 Miss Charlotte'• Dance Hall & Saloon, 911 W. Drew, 528-8840 Numben 2, 300 Westheimer, 526-6551 Pink Elephant. 1218 Leland, 659-0040 Rascals, 2702 Kirby, 524-6272 Venture-N, 2923 Main-522-0000 Eateries Gyro Gyros Sandwich Shoppe, 1536 Westheimer, 528-4655 Harrar's, 428 Westheimer, 526-2895 House of Pies, 3112 Kirby, 52&3816 Star Pizza, 2111 Norfolk. 523-0800 Travel agent.I Houston Travel Consultants, Greenspoint Travel Center, 820-4227 Montrooe Travel, 2506 Ralph, 522-8747 Trave!Tech, 5719 Kirby Drive, Suite 20, 522-8227 Flowera The Plant House, 812 Westheimer, 529-6050 Banko/Savings & Loans Mainland Saving•. 3401 Allen Parkway, 527.S.46 General service• ATCO Pest Control, 988-1331 Bed House, 2115 Norfolk, 523-8278 Ding a Ling Monkeyshines, 521-0.565 Business service• Speedy Printing Service of Bellaire, 5400 Bellaire Blvd. 667·7417 3317 Montroee Building <Office Leaaing), 3317 Montrooe Blvd, 62&8880 Hair Care Legend'• Hair Deoign, 906 Westheimer, 527-0188 Jeweler• The Rough Cut, 520 Westheimer suite K, 520-7050 Art gallery The Clemmons Gallery, 803 Marshall, 520-5353 Professional eervices Jamee D. Hees. attorney, 626-5518 James D. Kristian, PhD lttypnologist), 977-2485 Special eventa Montroee Symphonic Band concert, May 22, Tower Theater Mummenechanz, May 25-June 6. Tower Theater Clothing Baaic Brothers, 1625 Richmond, 522·1626 Company B, 5366 Weatheimer, 965-9753 Shoe Warehouse, 2024 Westheimer, 524-6606 Private clubs/bathe (gay) Box Office, 1625 Richmond, 522-1625 French Quarter Theater, 3201 Louisiana, 527-0782 Midtowne Spa. 3100 Fannin, 522-2379 6 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 MAY 14, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Sports Dirty Sally's stretches it to six wins; Jim's Gym, Briar Patch, Mary's also advance in rankings Galleon sails smooth waters in weekend games By Billie Duncan The Galleon came back from its previous defeat at the bats of Dirty Sally's to c1obber its way to victory in two decisive wins this past weekend. On Saturday, May 8, The Galleon creamed The Barn 30-10 in a stunning 15· hit attack. The Barn helped The Galleon out considerably by giving them 8 bases on ba11s and committing a total of 13 errors. Bill Schmidt of The Barn provided a gleam of light with his first homer this season , but it wa s not enough to keep away the gloom of a retiounding defeat. Then on Sunday, The Galleon faced the Briar Patch. They again shipped out with 15 hits, led by Arthur Castilo with 4 for 4. Don Kessler, who returned with a ven­gence last week, continued to swing a mighty bat with a 3 for 3 day. Kessler's presence just might be a factor in keeping The Galleon on top of the South Division. The Galleon was again aided in its win by its opponent, who erred a total of 9 times-7 times in only 2 innings. So, The Galleon wound up drenching the Briar Patch 14-5, which stretches The Galleon lead in the South Division almost to a point of comfort. •In other games Dirty Sally's remains unbeaten, having defeated Jim's Gym on Saturday and The Barn on Sunday, In the Saturday action, Sally's power­house hitters had a home run holiday. Mike Morrieon, Mario Marchena and Den Bailey all sent messages home the easy way. Dickie Hoke of Jim's Gym had a 2 for 2 day with a sacrifice fly producing 1 of Jim's Gym 3 runs. But 3 runs do not beat 11, and that was Sally's final tally. So, going into Sunday's game was an undefeated Dirty Sally's facing a Barn that had just been swamped 30-10 by The Galleon. An easy win for Sally's? Nope. Although the 12·5 score in favor of Sal· ly's did not reflect it, The Barn actually out·hit Sally's led by none other than the home run hero of Saturday, Bill Schmidt. Bill popped 2 fence sailers this game, knocking in 2 runs each time. Mario Marcht>na again led Sally's hit­ting with 2 for 3 on the night. And when it was all said and done, a gutsy Barn team sustained another loss. The team that Sally's romped over on Saturday (Jim's Gym) had its own romp MSA Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Saturday, May 8 Galleon 30 Barn 10 Dirty Sally'• Montrose Mine Briar Patch ll Jim's Gym 3 16 A&K Jewelry 5 ll Brazos River Btrn 1 Mary's Dirty Sally's Galleon Jim's Gym Galleon Jim's Gym Briar Patch A&K Jewelry Sunday, May 9 10 Montrose Mine 12 Barn 14 Briar Patch 11 A&K Jewelry STANDINGS Won ""'' Prt South Dwision 4 2 .667 2 3 .400 2 4 .333 1 3 .250 Montrose Voice 1 3 .250 North Division Dirty Sally's 6 0 1.000 GB I~ 2 2V. 2'/i Mary'• 3 1 . 750 2 Montrose Mining 3 2 .600 2 Brazoe River Btm 2 2 .500 3 Barn 1 5 .167 5 THIS WEEK'S GAMES fAll 1•me1 at I.Ivy F'Wld From MonU-, 10 out Rwhmond . .-.i Kirby. Wt on Ea•tlide I Saturday, May 15 No gamt>a AC'heduled on Sunday when it fact>d A&K Jewelry. The action was hot and heavy with a wild finale. Second inningexcitementwas definately coming out of the A&K dugout, with 8 runs scored, led by Ken Johnston's 3 run homerun. Jim's Gym was hanging in there, how­ever, with both John Moretta and Mike Scoggins putting softball satellites into outer space (or at least out of the ballpark). A&K rallyed in thebottomofthe6th. but when one of their men was thrown out in a bid for home plate, the party was over Jim's Gym took it over A&K 11-9. But A&K sure looked better in that game than they did on Saturday when they squared off with Montrose Mining Com­pany. The Mining Company launched an ll·hit barrage led by Miners Hank McPhate and Wayne Romero, who each had 2 for 4 on the day. A&K's highest tally was in errors-a total of 13. And even the superb perfor­mance of Ken Johnston could not over­come that kind of flubbing. Ken was 2 for3, inclucling adoubleand a one-pereon round trip of the bases. The end result was Montrose Mining Company 16 and A&K Jewelry 5. In the last game on Saturday, the Briar Patch soundly beat the Brazos River Bot­tom 11-1, even though John Summerall was 3 for 3 and Chuck Israeli an was 2 for 3 in their perfonnances for the BRB. But that was not good enough to over­come the 12 hits of the Briar Patch coupled with a good Patch defense. Joey Holton, Jeff Broome and Mike Grisold all were 2 for 4 on the day, with Mike slamming him­self home for the first time this eeaeon. The only other game of the weekend was on Sunday when Mary's moved into sole possession of the second place spot in the North Division by crunching the Mon­trose Mining C-0mpany 10-3. Mary's IO runs were produced out of only 7 hits, but the Mining Company helped out by committing 12 errors. •Bowling battle In the Monday Bowling Division D, a tight fight ia taking place. Galleon One may still appear at the top of the standings, but their lead is by a scant three pins over the Untouchables, Both teams have won 16games and 1ost8, so they are practical1y in a dead heat. Untouchables by a mere 4 pins, while top bowlers on each team racked up the high games for the night. Harley Baade bowled 241 for Interact and R. Walcker of the Untouchables was close behind with 240. Galleon One did not have that good of a night. Facing the CBC Steamrollers (who were in 10th), they only came up with one win , but it was a close contest all the way. When the final tally flashed on the scr .. n. the Steamrollers had only won the tot.al pin count by 7. Expect Galleon One to come back d(>U>r· mined this Monday. •Women's softball The MSA Women's Softball League may have gotten off to a slow start, but they are really rolling now. There are three unbeaten teams: Rene­gades, Hell Raisers and Armadillo Gra· phics. Hell Raisers and Armadillo Graphics both have games this week, but the hard-hitting terrors of the women's softball set, the Renegades, will have the day off. The lead-off game between Armadillo Graphics is a new team that has really shown that spirit, guts and good coaching can make up for lack of experience. League president Martha Richie is their captain and Kelly Caswell explained, "She took all the extras that nobody else wanted and she made a team." The Ducks on the other hand are a tight team that has been around for about six years. This week they have a good reaeon to want the win. Their catcher, Sue, sus· tained a serious fracture of the ankle last week and is hospitalized. The Ducks team is so close that they probably will not even drop her from the roster and pick up another player, even though Sue will be unable to finish the season. The other unbeaten team playing this week, the Hell Raisers, will meet a lively Kindred Spirits team at 5:00 p.m. In other games, Chuck's Angels and Twins, who both have won one and lost three, will meet head on, and Special Blend and Royal A·s will fightitoutforthe cellar •Racquet update This coming Sunday, MSA Tennis "';11 be played from 10:30 a .m. to noon. and the next week, the schedule will be from 4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.-a much more reasonable time. Face it 10:30 a.m. is just too clooe to Saturday closing time. even for the fine atheltes of the Montrose Sports Association. But, expect an early start on June 26 for the Texas Cup to be played here in Hous­ton . The only two cities involved at this point in the Texas Cup are Houston and Dallas, but both cities would like to see more of Texas represented. With an eyetothatend,MSATennishas reserved several extTa courts on June 26, so that players from other cities can play inside matches, which might stir up interest so that they would challenge in 1983. • 'Bakset of Cheer' This Sunday, May 16, the Women·sSoft· ball League will start selling tickets for a raffle. The prize "';JI be a "basket of cheer." Right. And what exactly is a "basket of cheer'>" WeJI, according to League secretary Claire Vasihoy, it is a.. laundry basket filled with booze. Tickets will be $2 and proceeds will go to cover expenses for the an invitational planned for August and for other organi· zational expenses. The idea is a good one, but board member Vasilioy pointed out, "A real money maker would be a board roast." The Untouchables had an incredible night last Monday as they faced Interact. The Untouchables racked up a whopping 3075 for all three games. Garn• three saw Interact edging the Sam Immordino, (secretary of MSA Monday &wling), Jim Reagan (president of MSAJ, Al Adams, Tim Adams, &ger Hart, all of the Next T' Last bowling team. Sunday, May 16 Montrose Voice vs. Montrose Mining Co., 6pm Brazos River Bottom vs. Galleon, 7pm Mary's vs. Jim's Gym, 8pm A&K Jewelry vs. Barn, 9pm MSA Women's Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Sunday, May 9 Renegades 23 Kindred Spirits Duch 11 Chuck's Angels Hell Raiaers 6 Special Blend Armadillo Grph 10 Royal A'o STANDINGS Won Lost Pct GB Renegades - 1.000 Hell Raiaers - 1.000 Armadilloa Grph - 1.000 'Ii Ducks .667 1 Chuck'o Angela .333 I'll Kindred Spirits .333 HI Twins .333 1 ~ Royal A'o .000 3 Special Blend 3 .000 3 4 Special Blend va. Royal A's, 4pm Hell Raisers vs. Kindred Spirits, 5pm MSABowling LAST WEEK GAMES Monday, May 10 HIGH GAMfo:S HIGH SERIES Harley Baade 241 Harvey Baade 601 R Walcker 240 Steve Stepleton 597 Paul Buenger 233 Steve McConaughy 594 STANDINGS 9 Dil·ision A 4 1. Daddy's 8 2. 69ers Division B 1. Bushwackers 3. Eurotan Int') 4. Barnyard Hoers 2. Splitz Endz 3. Five Easy Pieces 4. E.G.S. Protein Supplements Dwi&um C Division D I. Slow Hand I. Galleon One 2. Strikers 2. Untouchables 3. Cherry Pickers 3. Gator-Aid 4. Citizen Pain 4. Happy Trails THIS WEEK'S GAMES IAll 1am• et Stadium Bowl. 82.00 Bne1main) Monday, May 17 THIS WEEK'S GAMES {AU1amesatf'ood,Park Takel-45SouthioT,WphoMe:iut ~k: fMd'"" to Munr'"", rirht on M11ncer. 10 I blOt'k. tu.m Regular competition, 9pm Thursday, May 19 Regular competition, 9pm Sunday, May 16 Armadillos Grph vs. Ducks, 2pm Chuck'• Angel• v1. 1'wins, 3pm Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK'S GAMES Monday. May 17 Kindred Spirit.I (5245 Buffalo Speedway, 665- 9756) at 8:30pm, 1ingle elimination, $2 entry. winner take all Mary·a (1022 We.theimer, 5~1) at 9pm Ranch (662()1,1, Main, 529-9730) at 9 pm, 1inrle elimination, $2 entry, winner take all 1$50 guarantee) l'w«ia}. May 18 Lampoe:t (2-417 1\mee Blvd., 528-R92U at 8pm. ain1le elimmation, $2 entry, winner take all Wrdnaday, May 19 Briar Patch (229-4 W Holcombe. 665-96781at9pm. aingle elimination, $2 entzy. $50 prize G.B.I. 11419 Richmond. 628-8903) at 8pm, single elimination. $2 entry. winner ta.kN all plu.. new pool cue Thurtday. Jlay 20 Barn (710 Pacific, 528-9-427) at9pm, double elimi­nation. $2 entry, $25 first round prize, $15 eecond round prize / Ju..t Mari.on and Lynn'• (817 Fairview, 528-9110) at8pm E! J'1 (1213 Richmond, 527-9071) at 9:30pm, dou­ble elimination, $2 entry, winner take all. MSA Tennis !Count loCllt«l °" the north aid' of Memtina.I Orne in Memorial Park. STANDINGS 8. Riclt DuPgnt 9. Terry Rich 10. David Robicheaux I. Fred.Lopez 2. Lester Vela 3. Bobby Hopkins 4. John Ryan 11. David Gana 5. Jon Colbert 12. Eddie Chavez 13. Randy Jierscheclt 14. Daniel Casillas 6. Rich Corder 7 Victor Godine 8 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 'Sons of Harvard' examines lives of 10 gay men for 10 years from one graduating class By Joseph DiSahato On behalf or book'• publiaher SONS OF HARV ARD by Toby Marotta. Pub­liahed by William Morrow and Company, 105 Madison Ave .• New York, NY 10016. Hard­cover: $13.50. Publication on May 7, 1982. In the spring of 1977, Toby Marotta received a form asking for his contribution to the 10th anniversary report of the Har­vard College Class of 1967. NJ an under­graduate he had been a familiar figure on campus, an ardent booster of the Univer­sity, and a very politically-involved student. He had been caught up in the political and counter-cultural spirit of the '60's-a time when great concern was focused on personal growth and awareness and the impact that the changing moral and social values of the youth of our county could have on the political system. Marotta became clo~ friends with the son of Larry O'Brien (one of the chief fig­uree in the Kennedy administrtion and the Democratic Party) and saw his destiny as one of involvement in the political process. What prevented him from pursuing these goals was the fact that Marotta was also gay. It was not that being gay in and of itself would have kept Marotta from succeRs­fully purauing a career in politics. He would have remained closeted, as he had during his days as a Harvard undergradu­ate. It was rather that, as the gay move-ent took shape out of the counter­cultursl and political tides of the late '60s, Marotta'& political interests became refo­cueed as he began to deal with his sexuality. For Marotta. tfie personal became politi­cal, and ae he pursued his graduate stu­d iee at the Kennedy School of Government, the Graduate School of Edu­cation and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences (all at Harvard), his area of interest became the politics of the gay lib­eration movement. intensely personal account of his own changing attitudes, feelings and concerns about his sexuality. Marotta presents us with the fact that "the best and the bright­est" (aa Harvard men like to think of them­selves) can also be the gayest. Sons of Harvard relates the stories of men trying to come to terms with their sexual orientation, revealing their guilts, their fantasies, their deepest feelings. They remember their first sexual encoun· tera with another man, meeting in Har­vard johns for clandestine sex, the horror of being found out. They describe their evolution from involvement in anonym- Interview: ous, guilt-ridden encounters to partaking in the joys of personal, guilt-free gay sex. As Marotta describes it: "For a good many years, most of us accepted what traditional moralities aaid about homosexuality. We believed our homosexual feelings were wrong and sick. We thought it sinful and perverse to engage in homosexual acts. We did every­thing we could to ignore, repress and replace our homosexual longings. We spent endless hours feeling alien, odd, inferior, bored and trapped and hopeless. "For us liberation meant learning how to admit to ourselves that we were homo- Books sexual; to enjoy the homoerotic dimen­sions of our life experiences; to letnon·gay intimates know what we really felt; to dis· cover some sense in traditional ways; and to give homOBexuality a natural, approp­riate and enrichening place not only in our personal and social lives, but also in our professional and political pursuits." Sons of Harvard is an exceHentcompan· ion to Marotta 'e previous work, The Poli· ti.ca of Homosexuality. It presents a pereona1, human side to the historical and sociological processes of gay liberation so excellently and objectively described in the first book. His Ph.D. thesis was published last year as The Politica of Homosexuality, and it stands as the definitive work on the hie· tory of the modern gay liberation move­ment, thoroughly exploring the people, the political and social philosophies, and the organization8 which have contributed to the struggle for gay rights in this country. Toby Marotta talks of formation of national group of gay Harvard graduates When Marotta received the form to fill out for his 10th anniversary report, he had mixed feelings about replying. He ques· tioned whether or not he could honestly report to his classmates the fact that he was gay and what his activities and interests had been-in effect coming out to hie class. His chance meeting with a fel­low gay member of hie class ofi67 who had alao been politically involved and whose post-graduate evolution had closely mir­rored his own made him curious as to how many other memben of his claBB were gay and how their lives might have changed as they dealt with their own sexuality. He wrote back to the alumni yearbook, honestly relating his development and interests including his Ph.D. work. The reaction to hie publicly coming out was very gratifying, and he wae contacted by many other graduates of the clasa of '67 who were gay. Marotta decided to meet some of these men and set down their sto­riee in a book-Sona of Harvard. Where The Politics of Homosexuality was an objective, impersonal, scholarly work, Sona of Harvard is exactly the oppo­site. Thia new book is an intensely per· eonal account of Marotta'• travels acro88 the country to meet with 10 other gradu· ates of hie class. It was a journey of self­diacovery. taking him from the tenderloin district of San Francisco to the home of an Epiacopal ;ninister in Chicago, from a commune in Michigan to the halls of government in Washington, Marotta interweavee the interviews with and attitudes of these !Omen with an By Shawn P. Kelly Toby Marotta, Harvard '67, has graduate degrees from the Kennedy School of Government, the Graduate School of Edu· cation, and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. He is the author of The Politics of Homosexuality. After completing research for Sons of Harvard, he organized a San FTancisco­based group of gay Harvard graduates called Sons of Harvard, Inc., out of which emerged other chapters, now loosely affil. iatecl in a national network. Interested gay alumni may make contact through the Gay Harvard Alumni Newsletter, c/o Eric Rofes, '76, editor, 22 Bromfield St., Boston, MA 02108. Sons of Harvard is the name of your moat recent book, and it is also the name of a group of gay Harvard alumni which you founded, What caustd you to form the group? Well, I got the idea for the group, actu­ally, before I was doing the book. To my 10th reunion report I submitted an entry in which I came out, and after that was published and circulated to members of the class, gay classmates, most of whom I did not know before, began to get in touch with me and I found that a remarkable excitement came from that, and a remar­kable rapport developed. And so this growing circle of gay Har· vard graduates became my friends and that feeling of intimacy and fraternity was so atrong, that I thought that it could be expanded and shared by organizing it more formally into an alumm group. When did you form the group? In the Fall of 1979, with the people who lived in San Francisco who I had gotten to know in preparing the book. We just listed all the gay Harvard graduates we had come across or heard about, people from any class, but all in the San Francisco· Bay Area, and we invited them to come to a party. Then later that fall, and again in the spring, we heJd more parties, and our numbers snowballed, because each time we brought someone new to the party, they knew other gay Harvard graduates, and they came along too. San Francisco was the first chapter, but there are other chapters of the group now too, aren't there? That is right. The San Francisco chap· ter is the only one that is really called Sons of Harvard. There are now chapters in New York City, Boston, Washington, D.C., and Los Angeles, each with different names, and then there are gay Harvard graduates from all over the county who have been organized through an alumni newsletter that is put out by Eric Rofes out of Boston I started the groups in Boston and New York by getting in touch with gay class­mates. They were gay clssmates whom I interviewed for the book and we followed the same process in those two cities. How do the groups differ? Our group in San Francisco began as a social, fraternal group and remained that way until our last meeting when for the first time a gay undergraduate addressed the grnup, and elicited a good bit of interest in gay politics as they pertain to Harvard University and gay under· graduates. The group in Boston, from the begin· ning, perhaps because it is so close to Har­vard, has been much more closely associated with the gay undergraduate and graduate groups on campus, and much more involved in the particular issues that they are raising with the university. All of these groups have been in exist· ence for about a year and a half to two years now, and they are now in the process of defining themselves and determining just how political they will be, how social, how professional. What sort of relations have the groups had with the Harvard administration? At this point, so far as I know, the Bos· ton group has been most involved with the administration. I know that it has met with members of the gay undergraduate group, and talked about making a presen· talion to president Bok and visiting var· ious university officials. I don't think that it has done that yet. Members of all the groups. gay alumni generally, have probably had the most contact with the university through the "Harvard Magazine," which is somewhat independent from the administration, but which for about six or eight months has been working on an article on gay alumni. Thus far, though, there has been no offi· cial contact here. The core of your group, and the people you interviewed for your book, are in the 3540 year old age group. What are the differences you see in the way that you related to Harvard as gay undergraduates and the way that more recent graduates have interacted with the Harvard establishment? Most of my gay classmates were homo· 11exuals at Harvard at a time when there was no such thing as a gay group or even such a thing as a gay identity or a gay community. So we really had to work that out, wrestle with it, become gay really after the gay liberation movement came about during the course of the 70s. I think the younger graduates and the gay under· graduates today have gay groups of var· ious sorts, and they have the support of the MDA GAYLA REVIEW Kitty Keye, Charlie, Jessica Renee, Vanessa Peterson ancf Gina Marc head up an ALL STAR SHOW at Sunday, May 16 6-BPM $2 donation at the door You will receive a chance to WIN AN ARRAY OF PRIZES Donated by local businesses Drawing for a TRIP FOR TWO will also be held ALL DONATIONS BENEFIT THE MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY ASSOCIATION 2294 HOLCOMBE HOUSTON 665-9678 MAY 14, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 9 gay community not only in the university but in Boston. On the other hand, I think they proba­bly miss even more the sense of under­standing and respect, comprehension, on the part of the administration and straight undergraduates. They suffer from being, I think, misunderstood and dismissed for being gay people; we suf­fered from not even having those possibili­ties recognized. What about women? Are there many women members of these groups? Before we even formed our group, one of the inspirations for our idea was the les· bian Radcliffe alumni group. Radcliffe les­bians organized about a year before we did, and as I say, when we got together, we got together by accumulating people by word of mouth, and none of us knew any Radcliffe lesbians. On the other hand, the Boston chapter has made an effort to con· tact the Radcliffe lesbian group. One of the things we do is to hold bi· annual convocations of gay Harvard graduates from across the country, each June in Cambridge, and each winter in San Francisco. Last June at the first bi· annual convocation, the Boston chapter, which is known as HUG, Harvard Univer· sity Gays, invited Radcliffe lesbians, and I think there were perhaps six or seven women there, and perhaps a hundred men. The undergraduate group now has man aged after many years to get women in it, and I am hoping that that's a sign that women will join the alumni groups. What do you see as the future of these gay Harvard groups, but even more broadly, gay alumni groups from all universities? I formed this Harvard group for sym· bolic &8 well as practical reasons. and I think it has very important symbolic func· tions as well as very real poJitical benefits. Symbolically, I think it is very impor· tant for members of every sector in society, whatever nature-academic, civic, social-to organize. That permits them to make a statement that this sector of society, too, has gay people proud enough and political enough to announce that they exist to the world. Gay bodies from those groups can convey a message to other gays in those sectors, encourage them to come out, encourage them to join up, and make their statement to the rest of the world. too. When it comes to a practical, political function, probably these groups are most useful in dealing not with electoral poli· tics. or political issues in society at large, but in political issues involving gay stu­dents and their concerns in the particular university of which they are descended. I would hope that particularly as these national convocations grow in size and as more and more gay alumni from all over the country are brought together so that there is a real national constituency, that these alumni groups would exercise both their voice and clout in educating the uni versity administrations about their gay undergraduates, and help gay under· graduates get the same types of equitable treatment, and the same types of special support and recognition and facilities that minority groups need to feel completely fulfilled, to thrive. And then, in addition, are the very real practical purposes of fraternity and suport and strength. \\'hen you get a group of like-minded people together, people with similar experiences, they can understand their pasts, they underbtand better them· selves, they become stronger in that their full identities as gay people as well a8 uni· versity people, if they are university peo· pie. I think that is a real practical demonstration and manifestation of gay power and gay solidarity and gay fraternity. Shawn P. Kelly i1 a wri~· who ~ak~1-hi1° home in San Francieco. Invitation to the 198Z World's Fair From $ 175 per person, twin occupancy. May 1-0ct. 31 2 Nights/3 Days 3 Nights/4 Days FEATURES INCLUDE: • 2 or 3 nig.hts accommoda~ions indu_ding tax at The Palisades Condomini­ums. All u~1ts are fully furnished and mclude use of the complex's swimming pool. tennis courts, sauna and exercise room. • Economy size car rental for three 24·hour periods. unlimited mileage. (Tax and insurance are not included and are payable at the rental counter.) • Two days admission to the World's Fair For more information on this tour and for airline tickets worldwide, call Bob Houston Travel Consultants Associated with C re1•nspo10t Travel t'enter Pho~~ .'!c~i~Z J!1 c~:ursJ SUNDAY, MAY 16, 8 to 10PM ' JOHN DAY & COMPANY Wedneoday Co~.:'~~Y\v~:,ni!l\~~t. UVE BAND • ThurHday: Pool Tournament 9:30pm .., Morning Happy Hour ?am-noon Evening Happy Hour 4-7:30pm 1213 RICHMOND• 527-9071 Extra parking on the comer Mt. Ve-mon A Richmond 10 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 Harrer Ethiopian Cuisinr OPEN for lunch and dinner A touch of Elegance, Intimacy and Fine Ethiopian Food 428 Westheimer 526-2895 Featuring Harrar's Club Dancing 10 to 2, Mixed Music There's never a dull moment Don't miss the Fabulous TERRI ANN MELTON and the Texas Home Grown Band SUNDAY, May 16, 7-11pm ~ L A M Presenting MATA HARi featuring MARYANNE MAHONEY every Friday and Saturday, '1pm ·1om, llnlim1l<!d En,s;:o~r.mf~nl Sundays-Screwdrivers, Bloody Marys, $1, 2-6pm Mondays-Free Buffet, Bpm Tuesdays-All-Women Pool Tournament, Bpm 2417 Times Blvd. 528-8921 POST 2417 Times Blvd. 528-8921 Star Pizza will deliver hot and juicy to your door Free Delivery within 1 mile radius Come play In our new upstairs video game room * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOMS * New York-Style hond-thrown pizza * Chicago-style deep-dish pizza * Also available with whole wheot crust * Vegetarian plzzo 2111 NORFOLK * Storburst deluxe pizza (the workal) HOURS1 * Super sandwiches & salods Mon: 11 :30am-llpm ** Fantastic deserts ~:d:'~~~Io=::~~tpm Imported & domestic beer Thui 11 :30am-11 pm CALL 523-0800 frh 11:30am-mldnlght Sah 4pm-mldnlght PLEASE ALLOW I HOUR FOR DELIVERY Sun: 4pm-10:30pm MAY 14, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Movies Norwegians' 'Making Love': 'Life and Death' and 'The Execution' By John W. Rowberry International Gay New• Asency If you think Hollywood making two films in the same year dealing with homosex­uality in contemporary men and women (Making Love and Personal Best) is some sort of record, imagine a country like Nor· way, with a small film industry, and lack­ing the more liberal social attitudes of the rest of Scandanavia, also making two films about gay people in the same year Life and Death, directed by Sven Warn and Petter Vennerod, is based on their original screenplay about a doctor who falls in love with a medical student. The doctor is happily, we assume, married; like Making Love, this film also deals with themes of coming out and repressed sexuality. Instead of leaving his wife for his new­found lifestyle, the doctor comes out to his wife and tries to maintain both relation­ships. She is, at first, appalled at the whole idea, but as she comes to know John (the student) and re-examines her relationship with her husband, Jacob, she decides that the feelings the two men have for each other are genuine and valid. Being an accepting wife is not nearly enough. AB their triad grows more honest and sincere, problems arise. It is an interesting perspective, in how "Life and Death" views the internal as well as the external pressures that build up in a social environment like this one. The burning question becomes, will they destroy them­Belves before society does it for them? Life and Death treats homosexuality seriously, and works on issues of trust and Jealousy-which have applications acro88 the board. But at the same time, there is a sense of remorse that is nearly unrelenting-and the viewer is set up for a payoff that disappoints more than it rewards. Life and Death can almost be seen as an anti-gay film, in that the gay characters never have a shot at the happy ending from the outset. Being apthetic and misun­derstood just is not enough. Ironically, being misunderstood is the basis of the other "gay" film from Nor­way, The Execution-but where Life and Death was accepting and supportive of the characters' sexuaJity even while the fires were being lit-The Execution is a modern day "Children's Hour" married to "Joan of Arc." Thia contemporary story is about small­town corruption and the abuse of power by corrupted small-town officials. After a dramatic rescue scene, where a teacher saves one of his students from certain death, the teacher is asccused of having raped the young boy. The accusation may be true. It may not. The scandal, which turns into acts of sheer terrorism by local thugs against the teacher and anyone who takes his side, is a decoy to avert attention from graft, greed and petty larceny on the part of the police. In fact, somewhere mid-way, The Execu· tion turns into a Norwegian "Boys of Boise." Director Leidulv seems to be vying with Costa-Garvas to cinematically illua· trate how any power corrupts absolutely. But, because of the sexual ambiguity of the teacher, we can never really be con­vinced he is not a villain. And an allega­tion of rape against a small boy, in any country, is pretty hard to dismiss. The film wants to deceive-here the intention is to keep the viewer from mak­ing any final value judgement on the cen tral character. While we are privy to the actions of the police, we are not let in on SPECIAL FRIDAY RUSH HOUR 5-6 PM 504 BAR DRINKS the truth soon enough. The Execution is a dark, depressing film. The possible homosexuality of the teacher is played like a strip tease to create an environment, coupled with the corrupt local officals, that resembles a moral black hole. The teacher could as easily been created as a whore, or a bored housewife out look- 'The Secular Humanism Hour' A group formed to counter the influence of the religious right has won its first battle for equal time with a popular religious TV program, reports the Los Angeles Times. "People for the American Way" com­plained to a Loe Aogles TV station about views expressed on Th<! 7()() CW.b, charg· ing the program "Mocked the doctrine of separation of church and state" and pro­moted Christianity as "The official reli­gion of the United States." After reviewing the complaint, the sta· lion agreed to give the group five half-hour public affairs programs to present its side of the story. People for the American Way says it will also ask for equal time from stations airing other religious programs including the Rev. Jerry Falwell's Old Time Gospel Hour. Dangerous drug reports lost in the paper shuffle Congressional investigators say the government is doing a terrible job of pro· tecting you from dangerous drug~, reports ing for some quick afternoon thrills­aJthough I must admit, if I were either of the above, I would still find the film off en· sive, and one that only works at the expense of a defensive target. If Life and Death are box office suc· ceases, does it mean the tiny Norwegian will find budgets for more "gay" films? Let's hope not. the Washington Post. The General Accounting Office gays more than 40% of reports of adven;e drug reactions are lost by the Food and Drug Administration, and those that aren't lost take five months to show up in FDA computers. It's thoise reports of dangerous drug side­effects, sent to the FDA by doctors. that triggered investigations into whether a drug should be controlled or taken off the market. In re•ponse to the GAO report, the FDA says it will change the way the doctor's warnings are routed and possibly create a toll-free number to receive adverse drug reports. On hump or two? The Australian camel, imported there as a beast of burden during the struggle to open up the country's arid interior in the early 19th century, may soon be playing a new role .• dinner. reports the London Guardian. A group of Libyan businessmen has asked a camel farm near Alice Springs, Austraha, to supply 700 of the animals to ht> served as culinary delicacies. The Australians aren't too sure why the Libyans prefer their camels to the African kind, but at prices up to a $1000 a head, they aren't asking questions. the GALLEOrN CONCERT 2303 RICHMOND 522-7616 OPEN 2PM-2AM HAPPY HOUR DAILY 2-8 tDAY, MAY 22. 1982/8:00 P.M. TICKETS $6.00 & $7.50 AT THE TOWER THEATRE AND TICKETMASTER DY MILLS. CONDUCTOR 12 MONTROSE VOICE MAY 14, 1982 Neighborhood A room with a view­and a roof garden too Photostory by Ed Martinez Montrose abounds in diversity, whether it be of lifestyles, socioeconomic levels, or architecture. Nowhere is this more evident than in the house featured in Nejghbor· hood thia week . On a comer of Cherryhurst Park, at the intersection of Windsor and Cherryhurst streets. sits a stunning townhouse on four levels. Designed by an architect as his own res· idence, thia property has a sweeping view of the neighborhood, including the park below, reaching above the trees and neigh­boring low buildings clear to downtown Houston. The house is on four levels, total­lilng 2800 aquare feet of living space. The first level includes a kitchen and dining room and bath. Level two features a bedroom, a bath and a living room with fireplace. Also on this level is a wet bar. The third level has two bedrooms and a bath. The truly outstanding view from this home. of course, is from the top. There, at level four, there is a media room, which could serve aa a Btudy. bedroom, or what­ever. It baa its own bath and access to the roof garden, which is covered but open to the cool breezeti available at that height. The media room has been turned into a stereo, video and television room for the electronic enjoyment of the owner and his guests. The style of architectire is basically modern, but not garishly so. The room at the top is octagonal, and offers a window treatment that takes full advantage of the view from all sides. The house is currently on the market, listed with Talk Realty, at a price of $390,000. One of the truly comfortable things about in-city Jiving is the opportunity it affords to co-exist with so many different kinds of residents. Frequently, unfortu­nately, suburbsquiteoften are stifling and dull in their sameness. People often move to the suburbs so that they will live around people like themselves-same approxi­mate income, outlook, educataion, family style, politics, etc. At the same time, the end result all too frequently ia boredom. The world loves diversity, it seems and American suburbs violate that principle by their very existence. It is refreshing to see so many younger people of all types and backgrounds once again chooeing inner city neighborhoods like Montrose in which to live and enjoy. Homes like this one prove that Montrose is alive and weB, able to attract even the moat affluent resident to its charming ways. Don't miss the Fabulous TERRI ANN MELTON and the Texas Home Grown Band SUNDAY, May 16, 7°1lpm Enter our pool tournament every Wednesday night. Winner gets entire pot plus pool stick May 5 w inner-Polly May 12 w inner-Carlos Rick King and Company would like to welcome to our staff Jan Braham Hair Stylist and legend Specializing in manicures, facials, eyelash & moustache tints and a not-to-be-believed line of B.S.! 906 Westheimer at Montrose 527-0188 MAY 14, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE ~ontrose Symp] hotostory by Billie Duncan 'n Saturday, May 22. at 8:00 p.m. , the lontrnse Symphonic Band will be send- 1g out the first strains of their second 1ajor concert at the Tower Theater. But being there is only part of the story. etting there is the largest portion. And ~tting there is a story in itself. Attending a rehearsal for the band is most as entertaining as listening to the >lished end result-and anyone who has -en lucky enough to hear the Montrose vmphonic Band in full flight knows how teresting they are in performance. They have been practicing at the rehear- 11 space at the Bering Memorial Metho­st Church with incredible dedication 1d a sincerely professional attitude. And ~e JM!,OPle only ~et pa~? ~Y .~~ recogni- Serving our Community James D. Hess attorney at law 626-5518 misdemeanors, felonies, wills, civil litigations, business and contracts general practice <J->Cay;JL'l.C '3oCtiu Saturday, May 15 hosted hy Laura Lee Love, with Lana Kane & Eydie Mae Special Guest this week Ivory Jo Turner Coming next Saturday, May22 Sharie Amour Happy Hour Saturday midnisht-2am Sunday noon-midnisht Mon-Fri 4-Bpm Open l Oam Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant Saturday & Sunday May15-16 1-5pm Mr. Roxie Starr Mickey Rankin MAY 14, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 SH AllRl'.A. flll A flllflL WITH BOB DAMRON'S AD RESS 8001'82 UIS Ulll·a:l'lllllll·IUl:lllB'llllllll ·lll-CMllolllll Cl'AamUll· lllAll s9 cl'la•MtJfm17l·1M1I1M1-1t141a1:i1111:14 ·- ,.._,_ AT THE TOWER THEATRE IN CONCERT FEATURING SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1982/8:00 P.M. TICKETS $6.00 & $7.50 AVAILABLE AT THE TOWER THEATRE AND TICKETMASTER ANDY MILLS. CONDUCTOR 14 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 Montrose Voice Clip S Use COUPONS Each week in the Voice, Montrose merchants provide valuable savings through coupons. Look for this page each week. Note: some coupons are valid this week only. Others can be saved for future use. UI ~f7·A·LI ~(; M()~I\~~ itil~~i iingina Telearams! They'll never forget the gift or who sent it!!! Male and Female Bikini-Grams The Hulk Dr. FeeJgood Mad Momma Male and Female Bellygrams Playboy Bunnie Singing Bee Many More 521-0565 (THIS AD IS A $5.00 COUPON) MERCHANTS: MONEY SAVING COUPONS IN THE VOICE ARE A WAY TO ATTRACT NEW CUSTOMERS. CALL YOUR VOICE ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE OR ADVERTISING DIRECTOR BILL MARBERRY TODAY AT 529-8490. ------------ OUR SPECIAL SA OFFERS • 15°' DISCOUNT c,ff <>ur ever • THE QUALITY WORK that rommunity's quality printer an.E:_,.,,.., • FREE PICKUP AND DELIVE Sale discount good for all our serv business cards, general printinR. t forms, color printing. Xerox 9400 When you arr getting price quotes, For 15"ilo discount, present or me BELLAIRE STORE GRAND OPENING SALE MAY 14-24 25% OFF ON ENTIRE ASSORTMENT OF MERCHANDISE BRING IN THIS AD FOR A FREE GIFT. A LARGE SELECTION OF CUT FLOWERS AT LOW PRICES. 812 WESTHEIMER -----------------------~ MAY SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85-with this ad GYRO GYROS SANDWICH SHOPPE 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 Open llam-lOpm everyday (till midnight Friday & Saturday) Imported Beer and Wines ~-----------------------------------------------·, I :SAVE YOUR MONEY I BY USING THIS $10.00 COUPON* jATTHE SHOE I : WAREHOUSE I 523-6606 • 2024 WESTHEIMER (at Shepherd) I •Dingo. Levi, Convene I I Pu_ma, Pony. Texas Boo't. I Mtn1mum purchase $50. I , _______________________ _ 01 n e II ti a rt m p1 ti• it ce of ar N '11 oFn •I Mo s.1 ph• at To• an< dai Ra Mo an< boo Do •h• an< Baj Tei s .. u Mo Ma I MAY 14, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Montrose Live Montrose Symphonic Band: getting in precision Photostory by Billie Duncan On Saturday, May 22, at 8:00 p.m., the Montrm1e Symphonic Band will be send­ing out the first strains of their second major concert at the Tower Theater. But being there is only part of the story. Getting there is the largest portion. And getting there is a story in itself. Attending a rehearsal for the band is almost as entertaining as listening to the polished end result-and anyone who has been lucky enough to hear the Montrose ~ymphonic Band in fu11 flight knows how interesting they are in performance. They have been practicing at the rehear­sal space at the Bering Memorial Metho­dist Church with incredible dedication and a sincerely professional attitude. And t~ese people only get paid by the recogni­tion and response from their listeners. !he driving force of the band is Andy M1lls, whose own sense of dedication and perfection obviously has rubbed off on the musicians who make up the ranks of the band. Every week, a person walking down Hawthorne at about 7:00 p.m. is likely to see drill teams marching down the twi· light streets, while the strains of the first sectional rehearsal float out from the low building behind Bering Church. Passing the drillers and going into the building, the first ranks of the band come into view. The folding chairs are set up to seat the entire group, but only a partial contingent sits in the appropriate spaces. Andy Mills sits on a stool before them, baton in hand, the music spread out in front of him. He orders the low woodwinds to start. They start. He stops them. "The rhythm is wrong. You've got a half 1tf", two 16th notes and a triplet." They try again. He stops them. He iitus· trates what he wants. 0 Ba·ta-tee-tee·dum· dum·ta-dee-dum. It's hard, but you had time to work it out at home." They work it out right then. They move on to another section. Andy shouts, "Long notes! Long notes! And they were too late." They give him what he wants until he stops them with "You're not counting enough rests. Also you 're pushing your 16th notes. ' The musicians concentrate on counting the rests. Soon Andy stops them, and after a deep breath says in a deadly calm voice, "All right. Something I've asked you repeatedly, and how many of you have marked it? Two measures before 'D' it's piano. Mark it." They mark it. In the next section, he informs them, "You cannot take a great gaping breath before the fourth beat." Over and over again, taking short sec· tions, polishing, perfecting, or just getting it right, the band plays on. More musicians come in, dropping cases, sliding chair8, jumping to the floor of the rehearsal hall with music st.ands­and the band plays on. Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose rFnd•Y. M.ayl-4. thro\llh Tbund•y, M..y20) •PIANO Mont.ornery, Maye1 A Stritch 9pm Friday and Saturday; Carole Le.lie 9pm Monday; and Ste­phanie Parkt>r 9pm Tueeday through Thursday at RalK'ala, 2702 Kirby, 624-6272. Tom Williama 6pm Friday and 8:30pm Sunday end Tueeday-Thunday; BUI Hud.-on 8:30pm Fri· day and Saturday; Mr. Roxie Starr and Mickey Rankin lpm Saturday and Sunday and 8:30pm Monday; Jim Cater Spm Saturday and Sunday; and Marquerite 6pm Monday·Thureday at Key· board. 3012 Milam, 628-69AA Donn• Corley 9pm Friday and Saturday; Lion­ehare 9pm Sunday and Monday; and Sally Mayee and Biily Stritch 9pm Tueeday-Thunday at Baja'a, 402 Lovett. f>27-9t!66. Tere .. Mauney ~pm daily (except Saturday and =~'~i~h~1~.!:p~0s~:d:;f :~~!·::n~ Monb'ollt>. li2.8-2993. Marquerite 8:J0pm Monday through Saturday "Please do not breathe from 'two' to 'three.' There is no other choice.'' "Do it again. Do it again," "Lay back on it a little bit. And watch your dynamics!" More musicians come in. The bass drum with the Montrose Symphonic Band emb· lem is set up. Instruments are uncased. Sheet music is rustled. Soft conversations are mumbled in the corners. The band plays on. "All right. That's better Let's take it again and softer still." More musicians troup in. The flag carri­ers come in to carryout flags with which to practice. Music stands are expanded. Equipment is asRembled. The band plays on. A female clarinet player takes her place and a big smile bursts on Andy's face, "Well, girlfriend, we've missed you. You're never home." She smiles and the rest of the band laughs. A warmth spreads through the room. After a ohort break, most of the band is set up, complete with its percussion sec· tion. At least one large dog is now in attendence to soak up the depth of the vibrations. With the entire band in place, Andy becomes even more exciting in his con· ducting of the group, leaping to his feet, and I lam Sunday at Bacchue. 523 Lovett. 523-3396. •DISCO Kelly Marie IOpm Friday at the Copa, 26.11 Rich­mond. 528-2259. Pete Shelley Sunday evenins at Numbert 2, 300 We1theimer, 526-6661 •ORGAN Keokl Kon a 5pm Friday and Saturday, :ipm Sun­day and 5pm Wtdneeday and Thunday at the Hole, 109 Tuam, 628-9066 • COUNTRY 11. COUNTRY /ROCK ~~jt~2~-~~cho~;~t 5;;~:,7~eday evening at Bob Wllllam1 and the Trail Riden 9pm Friday, Saturday and Thurtday at Happy Trails, ?JS Fair View, 621-2792 Ab A the Rebel Outlaw• 9::JOpm Friday and Sat­urday and S::JOpm Thurtday at the E:rile, 1011 Bell. 659-0lt;J; and 8::Wlpm Sunday at Brazoe River Bot tom. 2400 RrazOI, 628-9192. Flyin& Blind Band nightly (except Monday and Tue.day) at Ml.M Charlotte'•. 911 Drew, 528-8840. Mu•tan• Band 9:30pm F'riday, Saturday, Wednea­day and Thunlday at Bruo. River Bottom. 2400 his arms shooting out in a physical com­mand to spur the players on to a greater emotionalism. Then sitting, hunched and insisting, "Ssshh, ssshh,ssshh!" One of the baton drill people comes in with news. "There's a fire on the side of the building." Andy tells the band to stay put and goes to investigate. A palm tree is blazing just outside of the back door of the hall. A hose is brought from somewhere. The tree is doused and the fire is put out. As Andy rounds up the band members who did not stay put. one of the musicians remarks, "And who said we didn't have interesting rehearsals?" Once back at the baton, Andy is again exhorting the band by telling them, "Ya'll clean these notes up." After a while someone points out that it is time for a break. Andy says, "But I just gave you a break." The reply comes quickly back, "That wasn't a break. That was a fire." "Oh," oays Andy. He gives them a break. Soon they are back at work with a sense of intention that practically crackles. One moment Andy shouts commands, his entire body bursting with the energy needed for the band. The next moment he is gently cajoling them to provide the 8l'UOI. t>:m-YIY:l. •GUITAR "L" 9pm f'riday and h-Uh Folk 9pm Wedntsciay at the Parlour, 2402 Mandell, 529-8069. Nancy Ford 5pm Friday; Lyra/Kat Graham A Llnda Awn Rhyme 5pm Monday, Tueeclay and Thu~ay; and_~w•lyn Ruffin 5pm Wedne.day at Kmdttd Spmta, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, ~ 9766. • SHOW GROUPS Dixie Kins• 4pm Saturday and 2pm Sunday at Happy Trail1, 715 Fairview, 521-2792. Mata Hert 9pm Friday and Saturday at Lam poet, 2417 Timee Blvd., 528-8921 . John Day A Co. 8pm Sunday at ElJ'e, 1213 Rich· mond. 527-9071. •ROCK II.ROLL Automatic 2pm Sunday et Grant Street Station, 911 Fa1rv1ew, 528-8342 •NU WAVE The E:irplo.lvea 10:30pm Friday; Platform or Youth and The Hate• 10:3()pm Saturday, and Teddy Boye 10:30 Thunday at Omni, 1540 Weat lwlmer, li28-4230 necessary gentleness for a certain part The excitement and dynamic presence of the man is enough to inspire the musi· cians to keep on-keep trying to hit the exact note at the exact time. And to do it with the emotion and dynamics that Andy Mills demands on every single note. Here sit about 50 people working their fingers and lungs out to bring to life a quality symphonic band-and they are succeeding. Outside in the twilight. the flag-bearers are marching, the smaller flag-twirlers are practicing. The strains of the Montrose Symphonic Band, though muffled, rolls across the parking lot. J.im Cariola, the drum major says, "It's techous. Real tedious. 'Cause getting preci· sion is an act of God sometimes." •Duncan's quick notes Write Home About It: For two more days, Sally Mayes, Sharon Montgomery and Billy Stritch will be playing at Rascals. They started their last set one day this week with a super-dynamic version of"All That Jazz." Now, starting a set with a show-stopper might be suicide for most acts, but most acts do not have this kind of talent. Billy Stritch alone is enough to keep even the most jaded cabaret-goer on the edge or in the midst of applause. But with Montgomery and Mayes, the excitement level comes close to cardiac arrest time. A really hot. hot act. Clogs Are Not Only in the Sink: One Tuesday, May 18, the Montrose Country Cloggers will be helping to raise money for the muscular dystrophy campaign at the Brazos River Bottom's Reno Casino Night. They are alao bylng to raise money ao that they can go to Reno to participate in the Gay Rodeo themselves. Pick an Instrument, Any lnstru· ment: Woody Simmons will be perform­ing a solo concert at First Unitarian Church on Tuesday, May 18, at 8:00 p.m. But solo does not mean one· dimensional. Woody plays just about any· thing that could be called a musical instrument, composes. sings, and produ­ces her own recordings. She not only does it all. she does it all exceedingly well Wilde 'N' Stein has more information. Goinc Up to De Feet: Terry Meason and Charlene Wright accomplished what had never been done. They received a standing ovation at Baja's last week from the entire crowd. No one was left sitting. Even the people at the bar got off of their barstools to pay tribute. Baja'• oays that Terry will be back, but they do not have an exact date. She will again be playing on Sunday and Monday because of her job commitment in Dallas. An incredible talent •JAZZ Robert Ceballoe Group 9pm Sunday and with Jilamy Ford 9pm Friday. Saturday, Wedneeday and Thur9day at Lu BN.u. 614 W. Gray,528-9969. Kirk WhaJu.m nishtly (except Sunday I at Cody'a, 3400 Montrote, 522-9747 Rumon 9:30pm ni.Jhtly (u:cept Sunday and Mon­day); and Mickey Moeley Band 9:30pm Sunday ~~onday at Birdwatchen, 907 Wflfibeimer. 527- • IMPRESSIONISTS Tiff' any Jonea, Donna Day, Naomi Sim• &Hot Chocolate Sunday evenin& at the Copa, 2631 Rich· mond. 528-2259 Little Bobby.Jerry Harper. Tracey and gue1t Sunday evenin& at Exile, 1011 Bell, 659-0453 Playfirl Follie1" with Laura Lee Love Lana ~ne. Eydie Mae and rue.t. 10-.30pm Sa~y at Pink Elephant, 1218 Leeland. 659-0CMO. • MISCELLANEOUS Talent Mow• Tueaday evenins at the Copa. 2631 ff:iclimond , 628-2259; Wedn..day evenina at Mid rute Sun, 534 Wntheimf'I'. 526-7619; and Thur.day n-enms at Twina. 63S Weetheimft', 62().()'.U.f,_ 16 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 Harry Callahan proves photography is an art Photootory by Ed Martinez Photography is a visual art. It does not pretend to be a plastic art, which it isn't. It begins with certain "giv­ens.'" which the plastic arts do not. But within those limitations, which are not really so much limitations as they ere parameters of the photographic art, the endless possibilities for conceptualizing vu1ual images stretch to the very limits of man's artistic creativity. Photography is also a very new art form, dating from the middle years of the last century, with the work of Brady, Morse, Daguerre and the early pioneers of photography. Some of the very finest pho­tographers who ever lived are still living, and still working. It is somewhat analogous to having a Da Vinci or a Michelangelo still alive and working today in 11culpture or painting. Ansel Adams, for example, unquestiona­bly one of the finest photographic artiste who has ever or will ever live, continues to work to this very day. vigorously, spewing out vast fountains of protean creativity, sharing all that he learns as he learns it with whoever has time to listen to him. Alfred Stieglitzin still alive and still vigorous, one of the pre-eminent photo­journalists of our time. In spite of all this incredible talent on every side in this very young, historically speaking, art form, photography still has yet to be anything like fully accepted by the art world as a valid art form. The rea­sons are many, and do not really deserve much discussion. The fact is that there has been an explo­sion of interest in photography since even World War II. with the invention of real· tively cheap, reliable and very high qual­ity 35 millimeter single lens reflex cameras. Japan seized the lead in the manufacture of these cameras from Ger­many after the war, and their sales have been booming ever since. One result of so much popularinterestin photography has been the appreciation of the artists in the world of photography, one of whom is the photographer Harry Callahan. He is one of those very fine pho­tographic artists who started working seriously in photography in the early 40s. Callahan met and became associated with Adams, Stieglitz, Edward Steichen and others, and had exhibits at the Museum of Modern Art, The Metropolitan Museum, and The Llght Gallery in New York . He has won a Guggenheim FelJow­ship, and the only Graham Foundation Award ever given to a photographer. Mr. Callahans' awards and honors are Jiterally too numerous to be hated, but it is in his latest work, from 1968 to the present, where his ta.Jent reaches its full flower. Harry Callahan has published several books on his photography, the latest of which, Harry Callahan·Cowr, was pub­lished in 1980, and forms the title of this show through June 5 at the Clemons Gal­lery, 803 Marshall. Callahans' work is characterized by technical excellence that one quickly comes to take for granted, which is a pity. MONTROSE TRAVEL WHERE ALL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS 4TH OF JULY IN NEW ORLEANS 2 nights at the French Quarter Hotel $149, all inclusive MAZALAN, JULY 3 4 wonderful days at the Plaza Del Raye $239 RENO RODEO All Inclusive Tour, $399 (Hurry, only a few seats left!) 2506 RALPH-522-8747 All the years that Mr. Callahan spent learning his craft result, ironical1y, in that craftsmanship seeming natural, in being almost assumed in his photographs. The colors in this show, many seen in Houston for the first time, are intensely vivid , and the eye for compasition that utilized the colors throws them out to the viewer. The works in this show are so very advanced and timeless thattheyestablish firmly the place that photography has at long last and with such difficulty been awarded: a place in the fine arts. Montrose Art These works by Callahan are without doubt fine works of art that will live as long as man appreciates that which is beautiful. Houston is fortunate to have a gallery like the Clemons Gallery devoted to fine photography. More and more gal· leries across the country are springing up, devoted solely to the art of photography, and to fosteringtheinterestofartloversin this new and very vital art form . Houstonians deserve the oppartunity to see these fine works that are currently and regularly being shown at this gallery. rt ut as is a I-p, y , in to d . ' The response is overwhelming in support of Our 2nd Love-In Sunday, May 23, 4-Spm Hundreds of Dollars in prizes 1950s drink prices $1 Cover, $1 Well Free Beer, Free Buffet HARRY CALLAHAN 911 W. Drew, 528-8840 MAY 14, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 WEEKLY CALENDAR TUESDAY-Free C&W lessons 8-10pm, followed by live DJ playing your requests WEDNESQAY-Steak Night, 7-9pm. 5 Buck Inflation Fighter, 16 oz. steak, bake tater, salad, baked beans, bread + 2 Free Well Drinks or All the free beer you can drink + Dancing to the Flying Blind Band at 9pm THY.SDAY-FRIQAY-SATURQAY­Danc1n' to the Flying Blind Band, 9:30-1:30, with aher-hours Friday & Saturday with live DJ SUNDAY 4-8-Live DJ, Free Beer, Free BUffet, ollowed by the Flying Blind Band 8-12pm THE C LEMONS G ALLERY IS PLEASED TO BRING TO HOUSTON FOR THE FIRST TIME * Custom jewelry design for your lifestyle * Mi.~~11 AN EXHIBITION Jewelers & apprasiers to the Montrose for 8 years THE CLEMONS GALLERY 803 MARSHALL, HOUSTON 77006 520-5353 GALLERY HOURS 10AM-5PM TUESDAY· SATURDAY OF THE COLOR WORKS OF ONE OF A MERICA'S MOST HONORED AND DISTINGUISHED PHOTO­GRAPHERS. HARRY C ALLAHAN THE EXHIBITION CONTINUES THROUGH JUNE 5 Immediate cash now • We also BUY GOLD, class rings, watches, old mountings, coins, dental gold • Anything made of SILVER ... jewelry, tea sets, silverware, pre-1964 coins • Diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds * FREE APPRASIAL * Tue thru Sat 10am-5pm 520 Westheimer suite K 520-7050 18 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 Heritage Lucius Beebe: for 30 years, the latest word By Patrick Franklin 1982 Stonewall Feature. Syndicate "Luscious Lucius," Walter Winchell called him, with more than a trace of envy beneath the spite. For 30 years, three of America's tackiest decades. Lucius Beebe's column was read as the latest word on what was good and what was bad. what was smart and what was not in cafe society, a term Beebe may have coined himself. Winchell had street savvy, but Lucius had Style. By the time he was 19, he had been kicked out of six prestigious prep ochoola and both Harvard and Yale. He was also listed in Who 's Who, one of the youngest ever to make that list on his own crook. "Nothing matters but the gallant ges­ture," he was fond of aaying; but when Lucius Beebe, standing six-foot-four and weighing 180, made any kind of gesture, it was bound to he more than gallant. "F1amboyant" might better describe what he did . As a cub reporter for the New York Herald Tribune, he once covered a fire clothed in immaculate morning coat, pearl spats and striped trousers. Asked why, he responded, "It waa a daytime fire, too early for white tie." For a generation concerned with civil rights, atomic disaster and Reagan reac­tionism. his concerns seem rather ephe­meral. Proper clothes, gracious dining and a distaste for most of the 20th century are hardly the stuff the Gay Liberation Move­ment is made of. But Beebe fulfilled one vital function during the years around the Second World War. He waa visible. And for thoae who took the time to think about it, he waa visibly gay. .. Gay and proud" was an unknown con-cept. The phrase for Lucius was more "gay and unashamed." Like Stein and Toklas, Beebe and his friend , Charles Clegg, were a constant pair. The press referred to Clegg as his "partner," a term that has delicate over· tones. They loved to publish pictures of the two of them flanking their dog, elegantly named Mr. T-Bone Towser. Mr. T-Bone was actuaJly a succession of St. Bernards, a breed Beebe cho1-1e because "once my vis­itors see his bloodshot eyes, they scarcely notice mine." Clegg and Beebe met in the atmosphere of high romance that both cultivated. It was at a party given by the wealthy Evalyn Walsh McLean, and Clegg could hardly miss the giant man in immaculate dinner dress wearing McLean's most fam­ou11 posRession, the Hope Diamond. Much to the dismay of security guards, Lucius had borrowed it for the evening. The gem's dread curse fell on them that night when they went to bed and Beebe'• poot-<:oi tal cigarette dropped to the floor setting the house on fire. The romance was, literally, off to a blazing otart. For all of Beebe's elegance, Clegg was barely housebroken. Charles was given to occasional dalliance with both sexes, which infuriated Lucius. In the midst of one melodramatic acene, played with a supporting cast of onlookers, Beebe threatened to "lock him in the closet, where he belongs." But they hung together for decades, finding a community of interest and work. Clegg was no slouch at writing, either, and a fairly skilled photographer. Together they turned out 20 books. The subject matter of those publications was aomewhat surprising. Both men shared an interest in the Old West, mining m NOW OPEN T . pp~BERr~L~B1 s Friday Night, 9:30-1:30 Houston's most exciting new group BOB WILLIAMS & THE TRAIL RIDERS Saturday Night, 9pm-midnight, &. Sunday evening 6-9pm, to wrap up the weekend Bourbon Street comes alive on Fairview, featuring, by popular demand, the fantastic 715 FAIRVIEW DIXIE KINGS OPEN Noon-2a.m 7 days a week 521-2792 and railroading, and their writing shows a great deal of research in those fields. Beebe's interest in eleganc ~ sparked his fascination with the stories of paupers who came west, struck it rich , and aban­doned their Levis for diamond studs within weeks. Severe in his criticism of modem mores, he was gentler with his tales of sudden wealth and extravagance on the frontier In 1950, he and Clegg bought The Territor· ial Enterprise, a dying newspaper in Vir­ginia City, Nevada, and made Virginia City's decaying grandeur a first-line tour­ist attraction. They also indulged their love of rail­roading by purchasing and using one of the last privately owned Pullman cars in the United States: the aptly named "Virgi· nia City." It was a Venetian Baroque palace on wheels, complete with fireplace, velvet portieres and wine cellar. Beebe refused to fly, and the railroad car allowed him to travel to his favorite watering spots in a otyle he felt was fitting. With typical hubris, he had written his own obituary for the Herald Tribune before he left New York, and that journal dutifully printed all of it, including hi• words " ... it was a point of pride that he had never filed a story from outside con­tinental America. His distaste for things foreign was pronounced." A good line, but one that forgot his pref· erence for Russian caviar and French Bordeaux. He called the New York Times "dreary and pedestrian," but its obit caught his spirit more surely. When he died at the age of 64, the Times said, "Since he was capa­ble of practically anything, no story can be dismiSBed summarily on the mere grounds pr probability." Beebe's thrust was tor quaJity above all else. No matter what the source, its age, race or sexuality, it was theend result that counted . "Luscious Lucius" taught the lesson of the importance of the individual. Pot farmers peril park visitors Congre&sional investigators say the most dangerous creatures in America 's national forests aren't. bears or wolves. They're humans, specifically, survival­ists, timber thieves, squatters and mari· juana growers, reports the Washington Post. A report. from the General Accounting Office says paramilitary groups in Cali­fornia and Oregon are using national forests for weapons training, thieves are stealing millions of dollars worth of timber from western forests , and hundreds of squatters are illegally homes· teading on public land. Accordmg to the GAO, some of those squatterit, especially in California, are alfm growing marijuana. Wit.h park patrols decimated by severe budget cuts, the GAO oays, " It'•. only .a matter of time" before a forest vtsitor ts seriously injured , or possibly killed, after accidentally stumbling onto an illegal marijuana plantation . OPEN NIGHTLY, WEDNESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY LOCKERS SHOWERS PRIVATE ROOMS TUESDAY: Buck Night ($1 admlulon) THURSDAY: Gym Night ($1 with gym card or T·shlrt} SUNDAY: Buddy Night (2 for 1) A MAN'S PRIVATE CLUB 1625 RICHMOND 522-1625 * 'J\ GRANT STREET* * ** Live RSockT &A RoTll IthOis N * weekend, on the patio: * AUTOMATIC ** ** A People Ploce 528 -8342 * ********** New in Town? Open a N.0.W. ACCOUNT The checking account that pays 51/4% Interest. No service Charge on SSOO balance ~ Insured to $100,000 by the FSLIC [ FSLIC [ Call or come by today Mainland Sav(!igJ SET SAIL FOR SAFETY WE'LL SHOW YOU THE WAY HOUSTON J40'I Alll!n ParlcWOIY 527 8441 FlhENDSWOOO 102 N Fneno~wooo Or 482 1SSJ HITCHCOCI( noo Hignway 6 9196 SS47 BAYTOWN nm w ~kH at ~rtfl 420 S69:5 Open a tax deductible IRA specializing In 18 month certificates HOUST01'4 J40'I A t!'l Part"Na'I ... 7 8446 Fli!lf .-.DSWOOO 102"' Fnenaswooa Or 482 SSJ H!TCHC I( noo HU#'WIY. 986 SS47 llAV'TC"WN SOIW 8Jkl"f'lti;-'rm 4~ S69J ~ - - I a ~A MAY 14, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 BEDS! BEDS! Simmons Beouty Rest floor samples $600.00 King Set 175.00 $400.00 Queen Set 125.00 while supply lasts All sizes & frames available 2115 Norfolk 523-8278 COMPANY "B" Ann111/NalJ)I surplus from around the world Lost Our Lease Sale S366 WESTHEIMER 10AM·6:30PM MON.-SAT. \ (TILL 7PM THURS.) HOUSTON 770S8 96S·97S3 11 11 SUPERB OFFICE SPACE At 3317 MONTROSE at Hawthorne Small offices & large suites available, short term and long term leases, remodeled to suit tenant Call Tim Crockett 626-8880 • • • • 20 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 :-~~~~~----,,...-~~~~--.. PROFESSIONAL Hypnosis & Counseling Service Personal •Confidential James D. Kristian, Ph.D. REGISTERED HYPNOLOGIST IMPROVE: Sleep. confidence . self worth . shyness memory concentra· t1on. self-esteem . relaxation habits love emotion OVERCOME: Fear anxiety. gu It. depres­sion . nervousness. drug abuse alcohol abuse. anger onel1· ness. weight STUDENT AND SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977-2485 DISCOUNT FIRST VISIT DISCOUNT WITH AD "' TBB BARN n-. \.'t Houston's Friendliest Country & Western Bar SUliDAY: Buffet for the MDA*. KON-SAT: Open 7am. KONDAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. Also SPECIAL MDA POOL TOURNEY. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 528-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Tuesday Night: Casino night at BRB, benefit· ing MDA & the Montrose Cloggers May 22 at the Barn: Sidewalk sale all day & pancake breakfast, S.11 May 23: City wide carnival at 901 W. Ala­bama benefitting MDA •Mu.ecular l)yatrophy A.Mociation ,. BOOZE/BEER BUST, 3-9PM, SATURDAY/SUNDAY Picture yourself with our giant 1/3-pounder ; ... ~,. <; I ..... ,,!_.j,: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, 24 hours More than 40 Varieties of Freshly Baked Pies & Cakes OPEN 24 HOURS ltousE of piEs RESTAURANT AND BAKERY 3112 Kirby, 528-3816 OPEN 24 HOURS 6142 Westheimer, 782-1290 Letters & Comments Time again for the annual Montrose mugging season From Ray Hill Hou•ton Human Ri1hte League They're at it again. They really never stopped, they've just had other things to do and haven't been as visible as they were last summer. But you can see and hear them any night of the week, more frequently on weekends. Partick and I walk the strip from Tin Tin and the French Quarter to Mary's or Tim'a. We see their fat, hate-twisted faces and their streched, red necks as they holler and yell "fags," "sick queers" or some other such expletives out of the windows of their parents cars. I'm talking about the invasion of white punks on dope from Memorial, Pasadena and Bellaire/Westbury. Taken one at a time, they are not dangerous. Actually they come alone in search of someone to mess around with. (They are rarely successful in that search because lower Westheimer has more kids than those looking for kids.) The most mixed couples will do is yell, bum a tankfull of gas, and go home near the curfew set by their parents. But a carload of males drinking, or using other violence-prone drugs, are dangerous. They range in age from old enough to get out at night to grown up enough to develop their own sexual security. (Some men, like KKKers, Nazi party types and religious fanatics, never grow up that much.) Most are white. Some are Mexican. A few are Black. None are hustlers (to dis pell a popular myth). Most will grow up to be white collar workers like their fathers. Many will be cops like their fathers. Some will be gay. But during that awkward period of their lives before they develop sexual maturity they are sexually frustrated enough to focus their rage on us. They are products of the religious and social condemnation of gay people in America homes, worksites and churches. Their fear of us festers in public and private schools where administrations refuse to discuss sexuality (ours or theirs) because some parents fear their children will grow up without the sexual frustrations and fears that has caused most of the anxiety in their lives. They have learned about violence from their parents, television I movies, and the atmosphere in the schools. They think that violence used against queers is alright because even the police do it and get away with it. While I have seen police officers stop carloads of potential queer harassers and advise them to leave Montrose in the best interest of all concerned, I have also seen cops encourage their civilian equivilants with supportive smiles and waves after hearing hate-filled expletives. In reality, the police are not much help when violence actually occurs. They are reportedly understaffed (although in Montrose when they aren't swaping stories at the Baby Giant, four cars at a time, they are chasing turners off of Avondale, with none where violence usually happens). Neartown's foot patrol is much more effective at controhng violence than any on duty effort, and they are nice people. But there are too few of them. I believe the Guardian Angles are an effective deterant when on patrol and Montrose Patrol has proven its effectiveness, when active, for the last several years. None of the above replaces the common sense of potential victims. Never go alone into dark or isolated areas. Avoid the alleys and other such areas where assailants cau lurk out of view until victims stroJI into a trap. Know the people you lehve the bar with or at least introduce them to friends in the bar before you leave, so that the handsome stranger knows there is someone that can identify him if he has anything in mind other then your pleasant company. Avoid getting drunk or strung out on any drugs; you cannot protect yourself if you are not alert. Be aware of the problems and advise your friends to be careful. Remember the make, model and color of cars full of suspected queer bashers and write down their license numbers. Report this information to the officers on foot patrol or Montrose Patrol. And of course be interested in other people's safety and don 'tjust walk by someone who may be in danger. Montrose Patrol needs to be reorganized for the anticipated summer invasion. This will be my first summer as a Montrose resident so I can offer more support and I encourage others living in the area to help get the patrol up to effective levels of participation. Watch for announcements of meetings and training sessions. Several lives are lost when the patrol is not uctive and visible in the community. Reader supports GVO From J.A. Stahl I extend my whole hearted approval to Gary Van Ooteghem's stance in testifying in the "porn flicks" case, as Mr. Ray Hill chose to call it. Mr. Hill aeems to think that no one except himself is entitled to an opinion without being called names. I do not know Mr. Yan Ooteghem per­sonally but his record speaks for him. He stood his ground against the county and now keeping in those lines he has followed the dictates of his own conscience instead of mindlessly following the whims of the gay political/social structure-a structure all to often led on tangents by some of our glory seeking leaders. It's a breath of fresh air to see someone stand up for what he as an individual believes, regardless of repercussions from other "leaders" in the Houston gay com­munity. Gary, it is better to be called a prostitute than to be a rapist. Song banned in Britian International Gay New• Agency LONDON-A song by singer Pete Shelley has been withdrawn from daytime play on the BBC because its lyrics are considered too homosexual. "Homosapiens," the song, is a hit as a bouncy, synthesized, dance-oriented rock number, but the lines about "homo· superior/in my interior" drew the censorship. As might be expected, the withdrawal made the song even more of a hit, drawing out the British press hungry for scandal. Reporters wanted to know if Shelley was trying to be a gay activist. He replied that he has been openly bisexual for some time. To step out of the closed now, he said, would be to step into a Jong corridor with everyone else. "What does that amount to? I Wdn't think it would be such an issue." Shelley believes "Homosapiens" to be in line with earlier lyrics of his songs, about the difficulty of human communication in a technological world. ''It feels good to me to know that you 're a homosapien too," sings Shelley, suggest­ing that the singer is pleased to meet another human being in this machine age. MAY 14.1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Happy Hour 7am-7pm Open Everyday at 7am Grant at Jackson 528-8234 22 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 ATCO PEST CONTROL •Roaches •Ants •Fleas •Ticks •Beetles •Moths •Rats •Mice SAFE, EFFECTIVE, INEXPENSIVE We feature the lowest prices in Houston, plus the best service CALL 988-1331 Starting this Friday KILLING ME SOFTLY and co-feature NIGHT BOYS Houston's turning to the VOICE! CANCUN All over Houston each week, thousands of gay 3 nites-S269 readers now pick the MONTROSE VOICE as their first choice. In fact, the "Newspaper of Montrose" is now one of the largest gay newspapers in the country. This is even more significant when you consider that the VOICE is not nationwide, not statewide. The VOICE is just Houston. The MONTROSE VOICE distributes 7000 copies each week-all in Houston-that get into the hands of an estimated 18,800 readers. In fact, the VOICE's Hous­ton distribution is nearly twice that of our competi­tor. To regular readers of the VOICE, our rapidly exploding new popularity comes as no surprise. After all . .. • Because the VOICE is just Houston, readers and advertisers don't get lost or confused by ads from other cities. • The VOICE is a professional news operation. We investigate stories and state sources. News is serious and we're serious about it. • The VOICE has each week page after page of news about gay Houston and Houston gay entertain­ment. Our competitor only devotes a few inches each week to similar Houston material. • The VOICE's new sports page provides in depth stories each week on the Montrose Sports Association-including softball, bowling and volley­ball. Our competitor devotes less than half as much space each week to Montrose sports coverage. • The VOICE covers national gay news and presents in-depth national gay features each week, as the VOICE subscribes to all six existing gay news and feature services, including news from the Inter­national Gay News Agency and features from Stonewall Features Syndicate. Our competitor sub­scribes to none of these services. • The VOICE has award winning cartoonists, including our own Max Angst (who is now syndi­cated nationwide). San Francisco's Gary Larson and Austin's Ben Sargent (winner of the 1982 Pulitzer Prize for Editorial Cartooning). • The VOICE has the experience. Henry McClurg, our publisher, has been producing newspapers in Houston since 1973. • There's no "thumbing" by news and advertising in the VOICE. Most of our readers read each page, page by page. And, most of our readers read the VOICE at home, not hurriedly at the bars. At home they've got the time to read the publication tho­roughly. • The VOICE has earned the respect of its readers. They know if they read it in the VOICE, they can believe it. • The VOICE circulates through over 70 major distribution points. Yes, Houston's turned to the VOICE in record numbers. And as a reader or advertiser, we invite you to tum to us too. We, as the only gay publication just for Houston, would like to be YOUR first choice. And even though we now out-circulate our competi­tor almost two-to-one in Houston, our advertising rates are lower-much lower. New advertisers in the VOICE, who are used to advertising in the other publication, receive two big surprises: • The results they receive with nearly twice the Houston circulation they had been used to, and • Their bill. You see, quite simply, they'd been paying too much for advertising and getting too little actual circula­tion in return. •fiSUTN an u •timated by MOSTROHE VOICE R.earch. followtn,: an n:~naive•• month ana1)'9Lt. end.inc with the wed: ()f Fib. ;a&, 19R2. THE VOICE GUARANTEES fTS CIRCUU TION If .dVfl'ti.in1 uJe. ~ tr.a any pubb~bon N.t.e chlT~nt riaur-, u.k for a ·swnm printer9 affidavil .. 1be VOICE will 1111dly provide one. Do not be conf\IM!d by the tnma ""readenh1p" •ZMI ''arcalatKH:a." " Circulation"' ....._na tha iu:tUGI nwn.brrr of copt,a "RelKUnhip" -ana the namber ol rMden. usually a fl.fun 2.81an 1nd~try su.ndard)umea the citcUlauon firure. aince an awrap lli"ll• copy will end up heme read by more than one ""'°" We've invite you to turn to us too. Includes ... Round trip air from Houston, round trip transfers airport/hotel, hotel, tax, choice of hotels -----~) T()Wl:t:? Ttif ~Tt:?f ARTHUR SHAFMAN INT'l l TO ,!\ll TICK£TSRLSER\.LD l1'hrl":\r~lr11 flH"\ , Wrd , Thur\ • 8PM $11. $11. & 59 Fri 8PM, S...1 · SPM & IOPM $1'i, $11. Sil ~~VI~=~ tr~(A~~1 .:-51'i\:i.~~'il ~ TICK(TS A\' All.ABLE AT The T°""tt H~•lre Bo .. Ollt<e•rtd •II TKl.etm.i\lf'rOUlleo lrilN1•mrnf'nl fll 1oupom ••ltd d..} ol -.ho"' oolt '>u~t to •••1l•b+l1h SUMMER BASICS Cutoffs: $3-$4.50 Tanktops: $3.50-$5 T-shirts: $4-$5 Swimsuits: $3-$6 Jeans: $6-$10 Call for consignment information BASIC BROTHERS 1625 Richmond 522-1626 Open 11-6 daily except Sunday MAY 14, 1982 I MON TROSE VOICE 23 Ben Sarge t. Ed.Pulitizer p ~ is the 1982 h itorial Cart~~ze. winner for ere, are a few nemxagm. pSlh own current world toeps icosn. . . ( - ~~--. 24 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat MAY MAY 14 15 MAY MAY MAY MAY MAY 16 17 18 19 20 For add.itfonal inform..tion •bout •vent.t btited. below, look for the 1ponlklrit11 orr•n1zallon under •()rraniubon1'" in ih• Mnntn.e Cl&Mifted. Selected Events through 7 Days • FRIDAY: Interact:Houston'e Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm-midnight, 3405 Mul­berry • FRIDAY: Lambda Alanon meeting at Firet Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin mMONDA Y: Montrose Sport& Bowling League games 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braeemain • TUESDAY: Montrose Sport& Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft • WEDNESDAY: Gay Political Caucus meeting 7:30pm, 4600 Main • THVRSDA Y: Interact educa­tional forum 7:30pm, 3405 Mul­berry, on "Gay Identified Organizations in Mainline Reli~ gioua Denominations" • THURSDAY: Wilb 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm-m.idnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected Events in Future Weeks • IN 1 WEEK: Montrose Sym­phonic Band concert at Tower Theater, 1201 Westheimer, May 22 mIN 2 WEEKS: Gay Press Association convention in Denver, May ~l • IN 2 WEEKS: 4th National Gay Invitational Volleyball Tournament in Denver, May 29-30 m!N 2 WEEKS: Memorial Day weekend "U. S. Openly Gay" National Tennis Tournament in San Francieco UN2 WEEKS: Memorial Day, May31 • IN 8 WEEKS: National gay health workers convention in Houston June 4-6 UN 8 WEEKS: Democratic and Republican runoff elec-ti. one, June 5 • IN 8 WEEKS: Full moon, lO:OOam, June 6 m!N 8 WEEKS: Gay Pride Week 82 Committee meets at Kindred Spirits, 5245 Buffalo Speedway, 2:30pm, June 6 • IN 4 WEEKS: Houston Gay Pride Week begins June 17, lasting through June Tl • IN 6 WEEKS: Father's Day, June 20 • IN 6 WEEKS: Summer begins, June 21 mIN 6 WEEKS: 6th annual San Francisco International Lesbian and Gay Film Festival opens June 21, lasting through June 26 • IN 6 WEEKS: Texas Cup June 26 at Memorial Tennis Center •IN 6 WEEKS: Houston Gay Pride Week parade and rally, June Tl • IN 7 WEEKS: Independence Day, July 4 • IN 11 WEEKS: 7th Annual Reno Gay Rodeo, July 30-Aug. 1 • IN 18 WEEKS: MSA Volley­ball tournament Aug. 14 at Fonde Recreational Center mIN 16 WEEKS: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Fran­cisco begin Aug. 28, lasting to Sept. s • IN 16 WEEKS: Gay Softball World Series begins in San Francisco Aug. 31, laeting to Sept. 4 • IN 16 WEEKS: Texas Gay Conference in Houston, Sept. 3-5 • IN 16 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 6 • IN 18 WEEKS: 3rd Annual Gay American Arts Festival in Chicago opens Sept. 17, lasting to Sept. 30 • IN 22 WEEKS: Weetheimer Colony Art Festival Oct. 16-17 Montrose Classified BUSlNESS OWNERS (I) W1 U.t frM •ch week in du. dinctory fa) kan~ •tabli.th ment. ;'.1(b, ~~:; .!T~.~j ~uton say bar11 It pnvaw dv.t. ~for the benefit of out-of.town vwtonJ ind (di non profit COQ1.10unlt7 orran1utiona • Indicate. llontroH Voice dl1trtbulfon point. EMPLOYMENT "Montrose Art" by Ed Mar­tinez, exclusive each week in the Voice GAY BARS (A) Hout.on Tavern Gu.ild membn indication , placed in thi.t dindory •l their rtq\llMt •BAJA'S--f02 Lovett-527-9866 -Wlih rM· taurant. live ent.ert.ainment See our ad elsewhere this iSBue Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice •>.BARN-710 Paclftc-52S:.942'f counity See our ad elsewhere this isaue •BRAZOS RIVER BO'ITOM-24008~ 626-9192: country •BRIAR PATCH-22tM W. Holcombe- 866-9878 See our ad elsewhere thia issue • CHAS~1416 Richmond-620-1646 diKV • CHICKEN COOP 636 Wutheimer-626- 2240 •COPA-21531 Richmond-528.2''68: di~O with •how• Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: o 10c~reaularwordor 1(;'i)ERALl-:CAP ITAL WORD in 6-po1nt type, u •hown htte (If wnn1 (•w word• in this .U.or ifcenterin1 on a liM. compullf at 80c a line. u.1n1 maxi mum 8 rqular word• or 5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a hn•.) 0 25¢ per regul;, w.;;d o; 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in S-paint type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, compute at $1.50 a line, using maximum 6 regular words or 4 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) D 30' per regular word or 46' PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in B-Point bold type, u 1hown here. (If uein1 few word.a in this size or if centerin1 on a line, compute at 11.6-0 a line, uaing maximum 6 reaular worde or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) D 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if cen­tering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line, using maxi· mum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) o 50e per regular word or 75e PER ALL CAPI­TAL WORD in 10-poin t bold type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or if centering on a line, com­pute at $2.00 a line, using maximum 4 regu-lar words or 3 ALL CAP­ITAL WORDS to a line.) Individual or few word.a in any one aize should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or 10 point). Simply compute each word individually. BUT you may NOT mix type SIZES on the eame line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per classified ad. BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra. Run the same claasif~d 4 weeks in a row and deduct 15%. If your claseified ia 1engthy, you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information. WRITE OUT your a.don a plain sheet of paper. Include your name. address and signature, and mail or bring it to the Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not bill. ~E~"'hifphml-..'iU-0170 The Voice has more Mon· trose readers, more Mon· trose news, more Montrose advertising. We're Number One ~THEOEEP=2212 Con•ene-&21-s1&1 See our ad elsewhere this issue ;mFF~-RENTDRUM-1732 Wmheimer 628-&28: leather ~OJRTYSAJry-;g:_.23:1 Avondaie--629-7526 ;£/J'•-1213 Rlchmond-&27-9071 See our ad elsewhere this issue •AEXILE---:.:1Q11 O.ll-&9-0453 country Larson's zany cartoons­exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice .CALLEi>N_:2so3 -Rlc"h-=od.-;0'"22,.-.""1e"'1e See our ad elsewhere this issue •GAY 8oY INTERNATJONALfG.8.l.}-141i Richmond-628-8903 •GRANT STREE-T STATION-911 F&lrvlew-&28-8342 See our ad elsewhere this issue •HOLE. ttO-UsE:.. l09·Tuam..:...628.i086- See our ad elsewhere this issue ..i.a.•9..:...808 P.dnC-621-2il9. -·· - See our ad elsewhere this issue •JUST MARION &T.YNN·S-817 F.in.i".,._: 628-9110: l•biAn •KEYBOAKD-SOi2 Mffam..:~28-8988 with piano entertainment See our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice .KfNn-Rt:D sPTR1Ts-:.52•5 Surra10 ~peed-y~'r.16: pnodominantly l•~n .u-11 Pcit1T ..:...u 1 i TI•~•-e1;cs-:=Hs-: 89'.l:l *hi•n See our ad elsewhere this issue •i.AzY J-312 Tuam~-..,..3 . - - ;wA01NG.OOCK=t7.tt~ 1818:-.therdl«O •kMARviS.:.1022 wffth;1;e;::.:6U:-SM1 See our ad elsewhere this iHue There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice · ~MiDNITE SW .634 -Weetheim•r-&2it 7519: di..-.o, •howl •111ss CHARiiYM'E'S.:&ii~w-:-or;;= 1528-8840 country See our ad elsewhere this iHue .-M0NTR0SE-MININ~~ ·~-~ - ·-- -~ ----- - • NUllBERS 2-300 Westhehaer-628- 6661 di- See our ad elsewhere this iuue •PINK E1.EPHANT=t2i8l.Hlia'Dd-=i69- 0().4() .nth ehoWI See our ad elsewhere this issue •RANCH·~~ MSin· ~;ig..citiO •RAS<:AL8-27o2 Kfrb.J=..62'-8272 with N9taurant. live enllfn.in~nt See our ad elsewhere this issue Attend MSA Softball games each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside Murphy's Manor byKurtErichsen •ROC'KY'S-J.416 w n&11u-r.~a: 1 .. bian •TW1Ns-6l.5 hthl!lmn~lf..bian ·- •VEl'ilTtlRE-N_:-2923 llain..:&2i~ See our ad elsewhere this i&Bue Tonight the hotlinl calls are being forwarded hm We n<lp gay p<oplt who'rt com111q oul,ar>dansr;<r ~1r<ptstions. ORGANIZATIONS A CAPl:lJ.A Chorus part of 1Moniro.) Ch11ft"h o( Chriet AC:t.u-12.ll W Gray-li24'.W~ - - ~ AMERICAN l.F.ATHERMEN (.ocial dubl­~ at l>ifl'f'f'ml Drum. 1732 W•thlftmtt- 628-M28: _c:lu! ni1h~ W__!I "Montrose Art" by Ed Mar­tinez, exclusive each week in the Voice A8TROR&1nbow Aiilancie-:624-4793Tv0itt • TTY) - - . -·- --·-- -- ·- BEK.ING Mlfl?lori•I Methodiat Chuft"h-1440 H•wtho~1017: United Melho<h•twor eh1p~~~~~.:__ ... --- - Bt.'TWEf:N TWO World•-65-1913c rnwtti l'VeryotheTThure BLA('lfl. wH1TK MEN'i'Qi;o;-;swMn:: 62NOOti. 747-8812 (Mni1ir->- CHURCH OfCHRIST~K WHlh•1mH-777·92A6 wor•h1p Hrvu:H 12::10pm Sun CHURCH OF CHRISTIAN FAITH-413 W•theamer-629-8006: worahip llft'Vi.C. 811.n =~o~ 1v~ !:r:!a:Toa~;r= Wed_ evenin1 _______ _ Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice COLT 46'8 (IOcial club}-meetai at Bruo. Rivrr Bott.om, 2400 Bruo.---628-9192 COMMUNITY COFFEEHOUSE-project or Interact. CONG. BETH CHAIM-meet. atMCCR, 1919 Decatur-629-4876, 624-6180: RrVic. I: aocial 8pm 19COnd 6. tou.,.rth=Fri'-'d::•,,yoc_ _ _ CONROE AREA Gay Womm-756-0364 COURT OF THE SINGLE S'l'AR-meeu at Pink El~hant. 1218 Lwland-«;9..0()40 ~!!18 HCYfLJN'-'E--:.....::221>=1506=---­The Voice has more Mon­trose readers, more Mon­trose news, more Montrose advertising. We're Number One DATA PRm·ESS10NAL8-meett1 at La Quinta Motor Inn. 4016 Southwest Fwy.-S22- 7~. 62J.6922: mwbn1 MCObd Tuetday• ,m,.A,N A FOUNDATION-2700 Muon-624 OJGNITY--meec. at Catholic Student c.ni.r, 1703 Bol•ver-6~7644 meetina-1 7pm S.tur· ~Tis~CO~P~A~L~INT=E~G~Rl~T~Y,=H~m.-.- ._-m_ff_I• ;~Uy!:~~~~Ya~n-6~: me«in1 Larson's zany cartoons­exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice FAMILY A FRIENDS of Gay.-meete at MCCR, 1919 Decat\lr~ meet& -=ond Svnday1 FIRST UNITARIAN Church-6210 Fannin 628--1571 worahip wrvic. 11:16am Sun GREENSPOfNT:;-i-·M1960 Area fir-AQy Fnen~l-9681 GAY AAiJVi"Sharins Eaperimce!GASE>­" 28-1311 528-0891 Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice GAYARCHIVt:SOtTf"7..: projectOifnte;:;d. G°AY ATHE19Ts teque of Amtrie11-624 2'"'2 GAY_H_JSPANIC CAUCUS-2722 Newm~ 1112-621-0037~ meet. 3rd Thunday1. GAYITAUANOT-oup-5'-"28-=-"9644""---~ GAY NiJRSis A PHYSICIANS ol Houton­cto GPC, 4600 Main #217-Tn-2287 Max There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice GAYPRJDE WEEK 82 Committee--meetl at Kindred S~iriU, 52'6 Buffalo S~way-784 ~~;:i~~'.;'.30pm;'.!ARD-6~'.::""'";._,,~·=11--- HEPATITUS HOTLINE-Jim or David at .m..- 2287: a projtict of GPC'1 Medical Commit­HOME COAWTION-1409 Oakdale-621· 0196 HOMOPHILE INTERFAITH Alliance-729 Manor-623-6969 Attend MSA Softball games each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside Hou•kln Ar.a GAY • LESBIAN ENGi NEERS A Scienueu-626-7386· meelll 7prn 4th Wedne.day1 HouSTONCoMMUNM'Y CLOWNB-B62· 8314 HOUSTON HUMAN RJGHTS LEAGUE- ~~~O~N-M~O=T~O~R~C~Y=CL~E"""'C~LU~B~,~,. Mary'1, 1022 Wutheimer-628-8861 HOUSTON~Vt:RN GUILD: -mbeu ~~~:. :U~~~~d~u~~~~~S ally'1, Exile, ilNTERACT/HoUltOrilfT~ Mulbeny-529-7014, 694-1732: Commun1t~ e~~=:e.. l~l~~~t~~~~- ied loc•bon1); !!f11callonal forum 7;.30pm third Thunday1 "Mo;:,trose Art" by Ed Mar­tinez, exclusive each week in the Voice ;KPF'T Radio, FM-90-419 I..wett Blvd.-626- 4000: Wild• 'n Stein py radio ahow lOpm· midnirht Tiu1r1 LAMBDA AiANoN-me;t. •t 11t Unitarian Chureh. 6210 F•nnan-621-9772: meet.int Fri everunr LiserANs A GA y PEOPLE in Medicine­eM- 4780: meet.inf 7:30pn 11.ret S.turda)"I LUTHERANS CONCERNED-meet. •t Grace Lutheran Church. 2615 Wavch-621· Ott63. 463-1143: meetins MCOnd A fourth Tu• t'llt!n1n•• MffRO~.omO..unity Chun:h of th• RuunlClion CMCCR}-1919 Decatur~l · !J:! ~4=d·n~:~6!~n "i: membe11hip _inq111n:,. d .. , ~,:'o': ::=~: :::: ;?n_n·~~_!!!!~-­fumendOU-;- clrcuJation in Montrose-the Voice MONTROSECIVIC Clob_(_N,.---.1--.,....- ~~~~~:.!:: =-~r:e-622-1000 He actually thinks designer ;eans are a product of genetic engineering MONTROSE CLINIC-HM W•thftm«-628- 6631 ; QJWn 8-lOpm. Fri, l--6pm Sun., 8-lOpm ,..__ ATh.n MONTROSE COUNSELING Cuter-900 Lovett •102-629-0037: National t•Y h-.lth worken conventioo in Ho111ton June 4-6 MONTROSE PATROL-620 W•theimer- 028-2273 MONTRo8£.SINGE~mee'8 at MCCR. 1919Dec:atur-62&0060 MONTROSE SPORTS ASSOCIATION (MSA)--622-33()4 ~~~US:.~'lf~ ~!~:~~Y~511at. ~~ 1523: 11.1n• Mon. A Thu11. eYenin11 The Voice has more Mon­trose readers, more Mon­trose news, more Montrose advertising. We're Number One ~~tlfr~=:t.~~~r:· :-~::;1u!~Ac~o,:~o~1M~>"''N.~•~ s o~•"''l'll"'A"LL-,,- 728-937I TENNJS-5Ui1~i: 'feW Memon.J T1nni1C.nier; ··u.s ational Tenni1TCM1mament1n ;':M~onc!,,_=o;,;o...,.'-'M"-~:~;';'·~.~~~: ra- 7:30pm Tuel .. Grerory-Li.ncoln 1ehool, 1101 Taft; tournament Allf, 14 at Fonde Recreational Center MONTROSE SYMPHONIC band-meet1 at Berins Chureh, 1«0 Hawthome-627-9669 T=~~~t'if{"yj:O,':e!pm May 2'l, MUSTANGS (IOCial club~~ at the Bam, 710 Pacific-628-8427: club nlfhl Thurs OPERATION DOCUMENTATi0tfJ)ro;.ctof ~~E Univ-.--o;y/L.9bianSuPpol-t Group--624-0724 TEXAS BAY AREA G..ya--332-3737: meetins Thura. eveninr Larson's zany cartoons­exclusive in Houston in the Montroee Voice TEXAS GAY CONFERENCE~ r:uco":r==~~i!'fl~!o:,~ Avon· ~XA;i.gAc!ofe~ ~Wo~Se~43.s622- TEXAS HUMAN RIGHTS Fou.ndation-1611il M&J")'land-626-9139 TEXAS RJ0E.RS--cto Mary'•· 1022 W•thcii --6~1 ~~0Hf~~p:~~E~u~.8J1fFfn[tn~ 520-9767, 628-6842.; meetin1 thud Sun. alt.er­n~ na w_ESCA.YANFKi.LOWSHJP-8&i-8fl99 Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice MAY 14·, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 Dateline S.F. What's P.C.? @1982 Randy Alfred What's P.C.? Politically correct isn't the only notion that's P.C. Try these, please, camarados: • Popcorn, penny candy, pork chops, pepper casseroles, pressure cookers, packed citrus, Peruvian coconuts, potent cloves, pizza chefs' parmesan cheese, pastrami connoisseurs' pickled cucumbers. Pastry cooks' prepared confections: pineapple custard, peach croissants, plum cookies, pound cake and pure chocolate. Pasteu­rized cream, percolated coffee. Premium chianti, Pepsi-Cola, & pousse-cafes. Pine cones, pansy crops, pampered crocuses, pristine-condition prescribed cocaine, perinatal care, pediculosis cures, Pierre Curie, Polaroid cameras, pin cushions, pocket compasses, pilot concen· tration, precise calculations, programmed computers, perpetual calendars, plucky competitors, phone calls, paper clips and post cards. Probable cause, pretrial conferences, peremptory challenges, piracy convictions, plentiful cash, plastic cards, precious com· modities, paid commissions, previous claims, prepaid compensation. Pension checks, poker chips, perennial confidence, personal charisma, people's champions, protocol chiefs, prized colleagues, pastoral commendations, penetrating correspondents and picture credits. Public colleges, parade committees, parliamentary councils, partisan circles, powerful citizens' perceived clout, public ceremo­nies' pomp and circumstl\lloe, polite celebrations, party clothes, polo coats, princely costume, patterened canvas, pink chiffon, pretty crystal palace chandeliers, painted cottages, pleasure craft, piper cubs and private clubs. Pleasant company, parlor camp, playful companions, prior con­nections, presumed compliments, pelvic curiosity, positive com· munication, prurient cravings, pliant clones, pert cavaliers, police cadets, plump catamites, perfect complexion, proper circumstan­ces, Persian carpets, plush curtains, pot cache, pina coladas, pais­ley couch pillow cases, praiseworthy copulation, priapic communion, paramour climaxes, placid contemplation. Pablo Casals' poetic cadence, Pilgrims' chorus, piano concerti, Paul Cezanne's pastel colors, purple cows and pussy cats. Popular culture: Paddy Chayefsky, Perry Como, Petula Clark, piccolo contests, penguin circuses, paraffin candles and parody cha-chas. Punk communes, planitive cries, Pacific Coast pale coral. Particular countries: Panama Canal, paranoid Czars' Polish currency. Papal conveyances' pollution control, punctual commuters' parking contracts, pedeBtrians cro88ing pedestrian crossings, plu­ralistic communities, peaceful coexistence, planetary conscious· ness. Planned conclusion. Roff trade: Assistant District Attorney Ken Cady (gay) asked Municipal Court Judge Mary Morgan Oesbian) to drop misdemea· nor battery charges against Tim Roff, 21-year'()ld son of appointed Deputy Mayor Hadley Roff. Judge Morgan granted the motion, and the younger Roff is now clear of charges arising from an alleged anti-gay incident aboard a city bus on Super Bowl Sunday. A week later, Morgan sentenced one of Roffs companions that night, John Fitzpatrick, 25, to 45 daye in jail, after he pleaded guilty to a single battery charge. LiMetector tests and the state­ments of witnell8ee all tended to exonerate Roff and another asso­ciate, against whom charges were also dropped. Contraband: Pravda reported last month that Soviet authori­ties had tried and executed former Deputy Fisheries Minister Vladimir Rytov for his involvement in a multimillion-dollar cav· iar smuggling operation. Were they acting on orders from the Sturgeon Gereral? You know what caviar is: designer fish eggs at $400 per pound. It's best consumed with Perrier, the$10.per-gallon designer water. Are you ready: For the new TV season? The commercial net­works are planning spinoffs of two Public Broadcasting system hits. The award-winning sado-masochism documentary, "SIM: One Foot Out of the Closet," will become a game show, "Name That Kink." Shakespeare's "Anthony and Clepatra" will become a weekly series, "Little House on the Nile." 26 MONTROSE VOICE I MAY 14, 1982 " By Jovel We've found it, Simmons! ... The Secret Elephant Playground!" " No, he 's not busy ... In fact, that whole thing is just a myth." Gary Larson " Say . . . Would you like to contribute lo an endangered species?" " Uh-oh ... I think Bobby Joe went foraging in that direction.'' PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ~:O~~!TJ~.~'..,~~1~n~:no~i~\~Jo~1~ floor. tlou11ton. TX 77006_ JoA:litor reRrveti riaht to 1dju11t wurd1n1 on all 1dverti1in1 Ratfo vane. from IOC to 7!'>C per word. SH •xplana lion at ~nnintr of the Clauifieda Relax and ~joy--th';-Boci).works massage. Gift certificates. Ca11 Bill, 526-2470 evenings, weekends. CORNISH REX KITTENS Show quality-$300. Blue, white, black-smoke. 520-5577. ~.::" .. t:~l.~~~.:~K~U:~~ ALONE? NO LONGER! 0-;;-r beau­tiful people (men or women) will accompany you while you enjoy Houston more. TexEscort. 751 · 9000. - - There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice Going on a trip soon? Is there gay life in Belleview, Nebraska? Walla Walla, Washington? The Gay Switchboard of Houston will be glad to tell you about all of the hots­pot. a: in these and other wild vaca· tion resorts such as Kalispell, Mon­tana and Wilcox, Arizona. The Gay Switchboard is open daily from 6pm to midnight. 529-3211. h)R AN ATM6i>SHEREOf~al v;;-~Ud :~h:L~r.~~~~:ti:~1~£=:: 747.u81 2. Be a companion to young handicap and be between 19-30 years old, be able to cook, clean, garden, have driver's license, able to drive & travel. Good benefits. If interested writec Roy Espey, Rt. 2, Box 20, Berry, AL 35546, or call (205) 61!9· 4690 after 7pm. ~:vi~' ~~J[-::.:;d:~~~~.:~~i~.t;!~.: ~Ji'l-!!1!'ft:~~~>af.~f.~'fH~~;!~~J~~.n Natfonal Gay Cofttact 7:1Ub for -Jnen -aod women. l.J1w ntea SA.1U: to Dean lfo!A'rpn-. POB 2ti044. S.n JON, CA 9M59. tfl-o . Attend MSA Softball games each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside ---- BODY MASSAGE. Your place or mine. Afternoon or evenings, Bruce, 521-2009 y,;;ve tried the BARS, BATHS, BOOKSTORES and BEACHES. What reaulted? Meaningleu encounter&, venereal disease and possibly a BUSTED HEAD­namely YOURS! Let HOUSTON'S ORIGINAL MATCHMAKERS lead you out of this SOCIAL SWAMP. Join LAMBDACOMP NOW under our pre-summer 12% diM'Ount LAMBDACOMP A PHOTO-COMPUTER MATCHING SERVICE S-10 p.m . Monday through Friday. 1-4 p.m. Saturday. (713) 721-5583 t-'Naf:r.~- with I niiht .Und----;:Lon;ly:.brl'd ofaame.. Olcl.n1uy, 1731b..6'1 I", brown hair, mtMJ•t.M'h•. 11~. ho..t A afff<'ti1:ina~ . -kl 11nail to llltd1um buiild,attractivt, clean ~~~~id:u~~AAo~l:~~~s:-/Jj~ ~>AdTi~;o~~ri=·v~i~~~,N~~ lf306, Huuaton. TX T1006 uUNo ovt-:R?·ir you want Midn;k,-ihat'• t•N:: ~="~.~~n~u ;:~y"'m~'::<t:r· o~~ now mwbn1. Monday•,~"'· eroJ:n A ~= G!u:~~~:::~ d1.::rin·· ~· ~:i~ror;r .!::t!ru:~:.~.v:~·s:na.WJ.e::t MC<'R 1919 n...-11tur Cnmeon by PRIVATE GAY CLUBS •ROX Ol't'ICl·:-19215 Rlchrnond - 622· 162ft ... i. .Seo our ad el ewhere this issue. •fl.uB i:f6iJSTO!IO-mF.nnin~99R ~1. •MltiTOw-NE SPA-3100 FinnTn-62-2-_ 2379 m•if'. Stt our ad elsewhere this issue. ;mc1x;-S::....2306G;n~l&fl235: male RESTAURANTS •BACCHUS-623 LoveU.-1523-3396 See our ad elsewhere this issue •BA.iA's-=4-02 LO"v°dl-527-8866 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •BANNISTE-R:.:.132'2 wnlh;~ •lfRA.~ERIE-515 W. Alaba-ma-5~44 .CHAPULTAPEC...:S1s Rkhinond-622- 2360 See our ad elsewhere this iBBue. •OJ.oicATu-R CAF£.,.:1os w~ -Ai""abam•- 528 8837 See our ad elsewhere this issue. ;c-REEK ISLAND=-ao21\aam-622-7040 -GYRO GYROS Sandwich S hop-11538 w .. lhelmer-628-<feM See our ad elsewhere this issue w~~J!:~::!is~~3&:•n Clll•ine-428 See our ad elsewhere this issue • HOUSE OF PIES-3112 Kirby-628-3816 •JADE DRAGON 224 W•theimer-626-2683 •,- ,M..A. .R.C. ELO'S lee Cream 1521 WMtheimer - ;ij•ERS..:.faos We1the lmer-528-8823 Dorothy Looking for Mr. Right (Editor's note: "Dear Dorothy" is our new "advice to the lovelorn" column, starting this week. Watch for it each week in this space. And if you haue questions or problems, write Dorothy, clo Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Housum, TX 77006.) Dear Dorothy, Why is it that every time I enter a bar looking for a hunk, some nelJy queen comes up to me to visit and I end up missing the chance to meet "Mr. Right"? Any suggestions? Perplexed Dear Perlexed, You might take a few moments to visit with Miss Nell and then exciue yourself with "I haue to find someone I came here looking for." That will kt you off the hook as you are not saying "who" you are looking for and if that person has a name at the time. If that doesn't work, just cut the conversation short and moue on, saying "I came to cruise .... " You might ask yourself why the nelly queen(s) seem attracted to you. Write again if I haven't hit a solution you like and I'll try once more. Dear Dorothy, Who are you and what qualifi­cations do you bring to your advice col um? Wondering Dear Wondering, I am a degreed professional person with numerous years of experience counseling with peo­ple in a caring, loving manrn?r. I also facilitate rap groups on male sexuality and relationships and am very concerned that gay people realize the variant life styles that are open to them becauae of their sexuality. Coming out of a m'dwestern background I have chosen the name "Dorothy" (not my real name) for obvious reasons for identity with the gay commu· nity. Hopefully through this colum I will be oble to offer some sound oduiu and add a little humor to your life. •OMAR·~~vm~­• KAsCAr..S:.2102 KtrbJ-1524--6272- See our ad elsewhere this issue. •RAt:fC\-,- BRA--::"i·s-RUsBING-91.4 vr Al•bam•-629-0627 .-s-PU().u.uKE-416w;.;tJ\e1m~ •STAR PIZZA..:-2) fr NOrrolk-1523-::080<) See our ad elsewhere this iBSue. SERVICES ATCO Peet Control-988·1331 See our ad elsewhere this issue •tTIN-ESSEXCiiANGE ~ .. ~nter~ Richmond--624-9932 •HAIRCRAIT ONE h•ir cue-2110 Le11nirton-626-6472 ;.J.i.A,_T_R,C,.R.,A,.F.,T -TwO'h;; ~2011 s. Sh~ ----- -- ~--- Larson's zany cartoons­exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice • HO"iJSTIJN GUEST HOUSE lodain1-I06 Avondale-620-9767 HOUSTON-TRAVEL Coo.ul tanta-820... 4227 See our ad elsewhere this iSBue Y)~~!1!~~1:79~uuty School-327 JAMES Ii K-RIST1Ar•(PbD.'"- - - hyg;l~~;';J~]~~~~ere this issue • KWiK-:-KALJ.. ~il801•· 33i7Montniee- 522-1896 ~!~~rm~~:4;~un-ooe See our ad elsewhere this issue. •"i.iONt:T H•ir Oeeian-.tt.«> YoUum~26- "M"AI NLAND SAv1NGs-a Lo.n-3401 Allen Parkway-627-8448 See our ad elsewhere this issue •MON'l'R08E ti•ir D.irn-4317 MunuUM- 622-2822 Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice •MONTROSE TRAVEL-21508 Ra lpb- 1522-8747 See our ad elsewhere this issue •MONTROSE VOICE ;;e-;;p;p;r-3317 MontroM, t hird n oor-1529-8490 MOPP-ETS CLEANIN(f SERVICE....:..93- ... , See our ad elsewhere this i88ue MOVING, HAULING. Movemasters, 521-3155. •-PRIVAT°EP08TAT. SYSTEMS mail bo•M- 1713 W•th~mner- -t.29.J020 •SALOsOAr;fu:L·h&; care-1626 Ch9rry ~1!.~"t='>~_!.~ - - - There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice :i3 lf0BERT SCHWAB,a«Or"n-;;:.152&: See our ad elsewhere this i88ue SPEEDY PRINTING~1540i) -Be llaire Blvd.-667-7417 See our ad elsewhere this issue. Attend MSA Softball games each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside TRAV-EL TECH travei arency:.:5719 Klrby-1522·8227 See our ad elsewhere this issue. D~~ITfifc;-b-1103 Anita~~ SHOPS & STORES •AU,~'TAR Adult Nf'w-11-1407 Richmond- 6'l.Jl4'l6 ;--A.'1.i~THAT G"LITTfo:·as·-.;r,-;-~4325 Mnn~:\22~76 .-ru-C-HARD Al.I.EN fo1onai.- .'iM8 we;jhe1m er--626-7796 "Montrose Art" by Ed Mar· tinez, exclusive each week in the Voice • A.ijvl,tlM Ad;;;-1t HoO"bl4~1.r11 ruchm(lnd • HAU:~PARK-Adult Rookaw;,.--=tS30 w Al•· .. •1iAS1C -e-ROT1nifs ch•th1n1· 1625 Rkhmond-ti:!l-1626 •THE Bt:IJ HOn;t:-21 f15 Norfolk-iii. 8278 See our ad elsewhere thia iHue. Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice •BLn: 1Rls~~6f8 s. Sh•phe°Nf.:623=" 1827 See our ad elsewhere this issue ;eoQM roWN st.o0MS n;;;;;:::,210 s S~hnd--626.j>IJIO •BYMAN's ___ EF;vJff.;-menlli"J-i>eilf.-n9"i • Fine Furnlahin1a-608 WMlhelmer-629- 8002 See our ad elsewhere this issue. CLE-MONs A-ri-G.11e;;=.soo Marlh.:ff- 1520.-15363 See our ad elsewhere this issue •OONE DANCEWEAR-4704 Muri~ 1673 •COMPANY 8- ;.;[11iary wear-15368 Wealheimer-966--97153 See our ad elsewhere this i88ue. The Voice has more Mon· trose readers, more Mon· trose news, more Montrose advertising. We're Number One •..D.R ,A MATIKA &'lfta-3224 YO.~ • FACETS ~~!412We.them.,r-62:J::1ilf Larson's zany cartoons­exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice •FRAME OF REFERENCE Paint-16.°33 W•thaim«--63>-0710 ; FRENCH- QUARTER- AdUJi -Theater- 3201 Lou.lalaoa-627·0782 See our ad elsewhere this issue. •FiliDAY'S ~i-1338 w.;thei--.~- •'"IN"f iNITE RECORo&-:6:.!8-W;;th"~m.,r~ ~21-0lfl7 •-JARDIN OE ST f"RANCJS--1016 Ped"'­~ 57576 •iffRBYN;;.tand~K;rl,Y--620--0246 •LE BAOUL Africu Art~ Mon~21""3348 Pulitizer prize winning political cartoonist Ben Sargent-exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice PALACE ADULT BOOKSTORE 7637"2 LONGPOINT OPEN24HRS. VIDEO, FILM, NOVELTIES, ETC. HOUSTON, TEXAS 682-9842 •PLANT-iWl'SE-812 weath;imer-1526- 77 .. See our ad elsewhere this issue ·~1 LEATHER_:408 we9thrimn..::6i7-9044. There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice •ffEcoR.b ff.ACK m1&11ic- llo9 s ShtPil•rd-- 624·36ct2 • SHf:ER FANTASY g1fta- ~01 Wf•thPi· !Ml'~ ;sHQE WAREHOCSE-2024 Westheini.er-1524-8806 ·SPORnfLOcKf:Jf doOuna-Jll -w-~. nwr-62Q.85S6 • sTuOi-Adalt !'-' .. w-li:ti w Aiaba.ma •TEXAS CARAVAN 6A-rln.d11i~ t-ioWttiJ- 2115 llunlavy-62(1.7019 ~~- ~~RE-u~ ·w Gniy-ti2: Attend MSA Softball games each weekend at Levy Field, off Richmond at Eastside ;Tiu:S('HICey-Mr· .5j)we.thrimer-626. 0078 ;;j'fil;YMA.ii"Cift.i-407W .. th~m"----6~i.zA •l:NiillfJAc·K ck>lh•Jll'·---:-i212 w .. the1mtr­l\ 28--9f\OO ;WEsTHE1MER Fi.EA MARKET-1733 W•theuf"lf'r "Montrose Art" by Ed Ma;. tinez, exclusive each week in the Voice MAY 14, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 27 Fortunes by Tycho For Friday evening, Mo.y 14. through Friday e~nlng. Ma)· 21, 1982: ARIES-In your sign all week: Venus. Passing through: tM Moon, from Tuesday morning to Thursday evening. You're feeling passion­ate, and your partner is talking about responsibility. Though this usually leads to misunderstandings, right now the opposite happens. You appreciate one another. Talk-and feel-it out. TAUIUS-/n your sign this week: the Sun, through next Friday morning, May 21. Entering this week: the Moon, next Thursday eve­ning, May 19. An inspiration on a practical level could lead to a display of talent you didn't know was there. And that talent could get you something you've always wanted. If you try sometimes, you just might find you get what you need. GEMINI-In your sign this week: the Sun (enter8 next Friday morn· Ing, May 21) and Mercury. A quick mind and an appreciation of how things work combine to make this a week for organizing, for bringing together the moat disparate of elements or people. Come together! CA.NCO-Everything you do this week (and there is plenty) makes you look good in the eyes of othen. Your ability to plan ahead and initiate big new project.a will amaze eomeone you've been wanting to amaze. Catch him while he ia stunned. LIO-You may not get the answers, but you are sure asking a lot of questions this week: what's it for, where's it going, why, how-you've got a Jot of them. Get the information you need and plunge on. No need to be a cowardly lion. Kiss a scarecrow. Hug a tin man . VllOO-lt's promotion time eomewhere in your life. You can go from being an aBSistant, a part timer, or a once-in·a-whiler to full. fledged control. Don't abuse your new power. Could it be that person you see so successfully once in a while? UBIA-/nyour sign this week: Mari, Saturn and Pluto. You'vegota knack for seeing the lighter side of things. You can tum serious situations into humoroua or even silly ones. Use that for protection. And if someone younger comes to you for help or advice, don't be heavy. Give it in that lighter vein. But give it. SCOIPIO-/n your sign this week: Jupiter. Something at home is bugging you. You want to get out, get a way, try eomeone or someplace new. And yet. where's your heart? At home, at home. A bit of a dilemma. Talk it out with your partner. Maybe some special travel plans ... SAGlnUIUS-/n your sign thi1 week: Uranus and Neptune.. Well, you don't need any advice from this quarterthia week. You're getting plenty from friends and family. An older man, speaking with author· ity, will put things in the right perspective. A time for receiving. Take it as it comes. CAPllCORN- Your emotions run deep, with a riptide to the surface. Last week's hiding turns into this week'• painful openness. Someone who thinks they know you well will be in for a s urprise. AQUARIUS-Leaving your sign this week: the Moon, Sunday morn· in.g. Fun times continue. There is no holding you back. You are up for almost anything. Kinky and weird have turned into wild and wonder· ful. You're looking for lust in all the right places. PISCES-Passing through your sign th.is week: the Mo
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