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Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996
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Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 001. 1996-12-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/882.

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(1996-12-27). Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/882

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996 - File 001, 1996-12-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/915/show/882.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 844, December 27, 1996
Publisher Window Media
Date December 27, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript z ~ :l 0 ::c DECEMBER 27, 1996 The Community Newspaper ISSUE 844 Jennifer Holliday Rings in the New Year An Exuberant Maestro Reaches Out A Conversation it ith Stephen Stein U) Jon Anthony Conducter-in-residence of the Houston S)mphony Orchestra Stephen Stein is on a rn1ss1on. Stem 1s out to educate and introduce to unyone who "ill listen to the be.1uty of the un fonn kno"n as orches­tral music. I I is exuberance and dedication to his cratt is extraordinary and genuine. In a recent mien IC\\ , .. Hh rhc lfouuon I 01cc the maestro talked freel) about his endea,ors. "'em has appeared "1th ma.1or S) mphon) ord1estras throuch the \car~ as a guest rnnductor In - J 992: he became conductor-in rc'ldence of the Houston Sy mphon> I k ts re,ponsible for devel-artistic plans for the S)mphon) 's many communtt) actt\ltic , mcludin .duca- 110 11.11 .111J t 'ul r~Blh <.:onccn .q "'t11,;h M the Sounds Like Fun! Summer festival for children, r irst Concerts on Saturday mornings, and weckda) concerts for school children Addtt1onalh , he conducts the orchestra in classical S~ason concerts Summer con· cens at M 1 lier Outdoor Theatre and the Cynthia Woods ,.,,1ttchell Pa\llion Stem also conducts the annual pcrfonnances of llundt.·I'~ Ht!tslllh Stem reall.1cd hts dream during the ado. lcsccnt stage..· of his life. ··1 rom the: 11me I "as about 15," Stem sa" I thmk 11 actu­ally happened because -1 "as ongmall) a percussionist and m retrospect I don't kno" tf I had been a violm1st or pian"t - the more traduionally diverse to conduct-f( ·01111m1t d cm pagt.• 11 J THE GAY-GENE CONTROVERSY By Chandler Burr Sec> Page 6 By Jon Anthony Houstonian Jenn1fc llolh­da> returns to her natl\ e city for a powerhou'e Ne" Year's Eve concert at t'ie Alie> Theater Holliday has been hailed by many a critic, this one included, as one of the greatest singer; in music today Holliday is a diva's dl\a A singer with a gift for 'ocal interpretation that \\ 111 leave you utterly breathless, Hollida> has an innate abil­it} to get msidc a ly nc and capture the essence of the mood The Houston l 01ce caught up "uh music's hvmg leg- lll<!d:lll:"'..i•'•~ end for on mtcntcn about i:.~m~~~i.\'~"'li;I. her future endea\ ors nnd return to the Alley theater Hollida) rcvi\cd her role as Effie in a production ot Dreamgir/s at the A lie} in 1994 ng ng 11 a Houston church choir at 17 by a member of a touring production of 4 Chorus Line, Holliday was com inced to go to Ne\\ York and audition for the Broad''") revival of lour Arm" Too Short to Box II uh God She \\Oil the pan. In 198 J, she landed the role of Hfic tn the Broad\\a) smash Drcumgirl>. Holiday became the toast of Broad"ay and the shm• catapulted her to national fame and "ell desen·cd retognitwn lkr J'O" er­house rendllton of 4nd I ,fm Tt llmK !'nu I'm \or Gomg, fr,lm the mus1c;dl, has become a classic s1gnatun: song for Holl­da) It's d11ficult to imagine anyone else pcrfonntng the hean wrenching ballad Holltday, "ho grc" up in Houston's third ward. never aspired to be a "nger or entertainer. "I "anted to go into la"," says Holliday In fact. she still has the )earning. "M) biggest regret "as not going to school to study law," said Holli­day. She does not rule out doing so tn the future, albeu, there arc no plans to date A fan of Aretha Franklin and Barbra Streisand, Holltday has accolades for some of toda) 's top artists like Celine Dion, Whitney Houston and Manah Care) She docs not resent being offered some of the music that they record be· cause she believes tt ts "their time. they are on top no" ." It's hard to belte\e that llolliday 1s a 20- )ear veteran tn the mustc industry, an, industry she calls "uncertain." She in­tends to head back to the studio to record ne" material 1f the "right opponunll) comes along " For now she 1s en Joying a long de>el"\ed sabbatical "I staned out too gro" n' I'm beginning to enjoy simple thing>." sa)' Holiday, "because I ""'er used to be able to and I "ant to go back and do those things." One of those thmgs she os dotng 1s sp<nd­mg d lot of time m Los Angeles to "develop relationships" \\uh the film und telc\lston industry . "Bas1cal1) I'm awatl· mg to see "hat opponumt1es nrt$e," she said Ho:hday clatms she \\Ould Jo,e to work in films and do televtston appear· ances. If she can act as good as she sings, she shou Id not ha' e any difficulues. Her advice to young people \\ho aspll'C a career in the entertamment tndusm ts to "sla) grounded" and remam f~used. "Belie'e m yourself, hone }Our talents K'ont1nud onpag. /11 Call now for heating system check-up. /\\{)Nl(({)SE EfficiENcy & 1&2 bEdROOMS $J7j & Up • BEAUTiful Pool/CouRTYARd • BiG WiNdows • FREE 8Asic CAblE • LiMiTEd ACCESS GATES • CovrnEd PARkir>.G CAll KAREN 528-5218 1/2 MONT~ FREE $375 MoNTROSB one Bedroom ,. great location ,. beautiful courtyard ,. limited access gates ,. covered parking ,. newly relurbished ,. under new mgmt. Call Karen 528-5218 WORLD NEWS 5887 Weslhe1mer 761·7793 787·6397 784·4412 _,,...._ ,/~ ,If, ,, • ..,,,( '1\t,/! \\~\ Jll ~,,,., ~\ll!W STAND 6877 S. Gessner 981-0288 Open 24 Hours • 300 Available Out of Town Papers •Magazines • Novelties• Over 4000 Videos • Preview Rooms• Private Viewing Roams • Racing Farms• Tip Sheets • Programs • Paper Backs• Foreign Publications • Fax Available STU OZ I NORTH FWY. GULF FWY. EASTEX FWY I HEMPSTEAD HWY. Videos & Maoaz:incs V\.dcos & M1g;uu1u Videos & M1;111nes 1 Videos & M1gu1nes Videos & Mi;uines t20t ~ 4121 hOr1h fwy 1221 GuU Fwy IOOl IEHIU frwy 12310 tlt!IJt!Slud H....., 521·1313 697 4310 64' 11'0 I 192-14o3 462 742• • Magazines •Videos • Smoking Accessories • Novelties • Arcades In This Issue COLUMNS: News You Didn't See Page 7 Gay Today Page 9 Rainbow Reader Page 11 Past Out Page 22 ATU'RES: Religion Page./ Regional News Page5 Art & Entertainment Page 8. JO, 12. 1./ Sports Page 13 Community Calendar l'uge I 5 Services Directory Page 16 r 18 Such Is Life Pupe 19 Community Guide Page 19 Where, What & When Page 26 Classifieds Page 27 Puzzle !'age 29 Personals Page 31 the Alps! 2 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27. 1996 - IVOICE ISSUE 844 .._,Dgec,e• m. ,.b,e. r_ 27, 1_996 s .., ....-19elloslleHMb!M:onttoseV­ctlcwiged n#'n8 b .. New l/OQ l'I 1991 R: >JlO'iillng ....... Orlow°"'*" Qly Str rvestatitishedOecerrtlerl, f99J•lle -Voce 811 Westhe1mer. Suite 105 Houston. Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729-8490 FAX (713) 529-9531 E-mail HouV01ce@AOLcom Contents copyright 1996 Office Hours· 9am • 5·30pm weekdays PUBLISHER Crad Duren EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT Jon Anthonyientertawnent O<h!Or Lee Dav1s/1pons odrtOr Carolyn Robertslsooety editor WRITERS Rich Arenschieldt. Oavtd Bianco. Andrew Edmonson. Larry Lmgle. Curt Mornson. Jazz Paz, David Richardson. Carolyn Roberts. Patnc1a Nell Warren. Glen Webber CARTOONIST Earl Storm PHOTOGRAPHERS Steven David. David Goetz PRODUCTION Matthew Penn1ngton/manager1art dsrector ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Jon Anthony, Lee Davis, Carolyn Roberts INDEPENDENT ADVERTISING SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Ben1amm Andre-Diaz.JC. Michalek. Stephen Schmidt Rill Sh•ppard CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS John Toups NATIONAL ADVERTISING RE:PRl!SENTATIVE R1vendell Marketing Po Box 518. Westfiled, NJ (908) 232-2021 NotlCtJ to advertisers· _ .... --... el!ect",.Sept •996 • P-1131 ot c:ompleCe feproclJdal cl any~ ~9ftldltotfreat&le copyorphotow_..ffom Ille ttouaon Voa • apeclJCaly prQhbted by ledlral _... • ()pn:Jns e:q:Jl'eSMd by coU'nnista 01 ~ ••not ~tmeoflN...,.,.ton\fQK;eOl'iblW'lrd\llrr• UW'Jle no katlllity for trw ~ •iq)fesslld or l'npbed al u.o lt1ldeS or ikeneu ol pssorm ~ ot dud ,..r or '1ctional ... .,. car100nl • ~ d tNi nsn• or pNMOgraph 01! .,.,. peracn or orgatlilatO'I ... .nid9I or~ n lht Houston Voce •nol W)tle consfN9d•• any niatlonOl!lhl ...... orientation d ._, p«IOl"I ot «ganization • The appNrSU of lldlt9ftlsements or opnona ••P'"Md lhefeir'tdo notCOf'liltltule an.rooraementor ~anlM by The Houston Voa or llS staff POSTMASTER Sendlddrthoorrtdlonl1oe11 VV.siheim91' St.tte 106, Houston TX 77006 Sub$aip0on file 1" US (by Camel OI US,,,.,~ S' 75 per Wtek ('$4$ 50 per 6 months OI' $91 00 per~) llsplayadvtHfl111tgdNcant 1200nooriCST ~IO neiNe~ 500~CST~to~8dcopyfor Fn0ay- CU5"ed~deadlrte 12noonCS ~for Fncliiy~ ~ We do nol ~ tnanaal tMl)OnlSbiiy tor..,.,sbW'ftt~llUl,....••••Med11:> .ivo.ir.~e1..,,~offr~or ~~anci~wllbo~l!ld. Met"IOet' en.., ttouaton Gar & letCMn C'*"ber 01! Comm.ca ""ationlll Gay N-spaper Glad, Gay & letbe9n Prns A»oc;i91lCl"I ~memo.rt: ~Preu 1 A Capsule of the Year's Biggest News Tht> Int omparablt' Lado; Viuorrn Lu JI 8) Cl RT '\10RRIS01' J. The Supreme Court Deci­sion In Romer V. Evans By a 6 3 margin. the Un11ed States Supreme Court upheld a Colorado Supreme Court ruling 1ha1 st ipulated the slates 1992 "'Amendment 2"' denied Gays and lesbians equal pro1ect1on undc1 the tJ S Cons111u11on. The rul­ing pro\11ded our community with pow­erful ammun1t1on for the courts to con­sider 1t other <.tates attempt to impose laws of similar nature 2. Senate Passes Defense Of Marriage Act Onl) three months after the vicwrious Romer \IS l~vans landmark. dec1s1on. the linued States Senate overwhelmingly 185-14) passed lhe Defense Of Marriage Act (!)OMA) which denies our commu­n 1t) lhc right!\ of othi:r cu 1 1.en~ to h.•gally m.11r) our partner~. President Cl111ton signed the bill unceremon1- ously 3 Pro t e ase Inhib itors f--'or the first wne 111 a long lime, there is a renl!wed sense of hope in our commu­nuy, especially for those who are HIV+ or have AIDS Clinica l s1ud1es 10 date appear 10 he promising indeed con­cerning the new aggressive drug treat menl and therapy called Protease Inh1h110D Of cour!<.e. u 1s bes1 to be cJu11ously op11m1st1c1 hu1 the resuhs to date are encouraging. 4. The Employment Non­Discrimination Act rttc I nued S1a1es Senate defeated pas s;igc of l·NJ>A On a pornive note. the dl'lcal ot the l•mployment Non-Di!-. cr11111nalio11 Acl hy one vole was sig· 111111.:anr 111 ..,o far lhat 11 demonstrated that we are doser to nhta1ning equal 11ghts in the wurkpl;tc:e than we have ever hecn 1n h1qory 5. Clinton Sails To Second Victory J>resiJcn1 C'hnton won a second term as PrcsuJcnl ol the Unued S1atC!!i wuh rela1 vc case C1inton angered many "" mmun11v leaders. lo..:ally and n 1 1ionally wuh his vac1lla11on on JCh issues as gays in the m1htary and ()0~1A, however, there 1s a sense m 1he commu HI)' lhaa Clmton will he an advm.:atc on our 1s ues now that lie 1s lame dud J'1me Wlil tell 6. Hawaii Court Decision A"' expected, a State court ~truck down 11.1wa1 's han on same.sex marriages mark111g 1he tir~t lime a \late c.:ourt has cvc1 rccuin11ed homosexual mar uJi:es J·irsl Cm.:u11 Coun Judge Kev111 Chang i11J1..:a1ed that ihc Mate failed to demon\lfiilC a compelling reason why lh< public interest '" lh< well-being ol children and famll1cs would be ~ttc..:tcJ lly "ame scit marriages. Dale Carpenur 7. Governor William Weld Republican Governor William Weld of Massachusel!s publicly stated that 1f Hawaii's rendering in the same-sex marriage case 1s upheld. Massachu­seus will honor marriages. despite DOMA In add111on, Weld staled 1ha1 he would veto any Massachusetts pro­posal 10 ban gay marriages Weld IS con· s1dered to be the mosc pro gay Gover· nor. Rerublican or Democrat. in the entire Unire<l States 8. Texas Log Cabin Group Sues State GOP The Log (ah1n Republicans of Texas (LCR·IXI flied sull again<! lhe Republi· can Party ot lcJl'.as over the party's deci­sion 10 deny the group an exh1h11 booth at the state conven11on . The su11 charged that the party breached a contract to accepr the hoorh and 1ha1 den ia l of 1hc application v iolates rights of free speech. due process and privacy under 1he Texas const11u11on. "Refusing 10 listen to reason, shuuing their ears to the complaints of (others) . . Texas GOP officials have left us no choice:· stated Dale Carpenter. State Presi­dent of LCR TX 9. A Great Lady Passes The Housron gay and lesbian commu- 1 nuy suffered a great lo~s this year with the passing of Marvin Davis, a k a. Lady Victoria Lust Davis earned the distinction of being lhe community s biggest 1nd1v1dual fundra1!<.er through h1' tireless effons and commit menl lie was extremely popular and well loved by many. In add111on, Davis was an lllV educator and counselor tor he Cuy ol llousrnn fleallh Department. 10. Fatal Intolerance Jlatc Crimes are 1111 1 problem m 1ur cHy and nallonw1de Las1 > ear"s death ot Fred Mangione was a !>ad ren11ndcr of the prohlem of hate crimes Mangwnc was hrutally murdered lie was siabbed 15 tunes ma \In ou1s1dc Doll} 's Place: a bar tn Katy The alleged murder s were sell· professed members of a neo-Saz1 hate group called German Peace Corps 1996 Houston We tfum/(our community foragreat year filie.i witli. .. and ~SIC BRO ~ ()rd ,,_ 'Pwt"'-e 1232 Westheimer • 7 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 3 1997 u m PRAISE & WORSHIP EVENING SERVICE HIV Affected Group HIV Infected Group IDWEEK SERVICE 4305 Lillian Handicap A Hou ton, Texas 77007 ce~sibJe 'Peut,oi - e~'ti4 e~de4 (one block south of Vlaslungton (713) ff( )-9235 on Thompson at L1ll;· Catch The Bering Spirit A Place for Everyone .. fl. BERING MEMORIAL I~ .,,, UNITED METHODIST CHURCH w V ' A Reconciling Congregation Where pe rsons rega rdless of sexual o rientation. gender, ethnicity, age - fully participate in the church's life and min'stries as loved disciples of Christ. Sunday School ....... 9:30 am Sunday Worship ... 10:50 am 1440 Harold at Mulbe rry COKIMNMGUDONqI TY CHURCH C<llCh a ghmpsc f ie Kingdom ,,r God Sunday School IO A M Sund•y Wonlup Scrv= II A \1 \\'Cdncsda.)S: A Coone in Miracles - 7:lOPM 4404 BIOOorn ot Snover 7l3-862·7"i~--====~ 5l1Nl)AY 11 ~ R~J~P~ An evangelical ministry with celebration services of Praise, Prayer and Study of God's word. Bible Class: IO am ('Vursery provided) 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Handicap acc..:ssible) (Montrose a'. Haw· horne) For n1fo. on - ' i n ca'' 528-6756 (713) 526-1017 ~ 014 hvu VOU, u C1m1 share the LOVIMC EXPERIENCE. Servi•~ the Gar, Les&ian, Bi-sexual l Community of Catholics & Friuds. Beeo1111 1 put of Dignity U.S.A. SERVICES Saturdays 7:30 pm Traditional Mass Inclusive liturgy colobrated. can and press 4 for our Social Events ' Schedules. Todos bienvenidosl (Full detuils in '95 - '96 Gay and Lesbian Yc/1011. Pages) In the Heights at 1307 Yale Suite H • (713) 880-2872 KOLBE PROJEC Jan. 2, 1997 7:00pm Pot Luck Dinner Community Concerns: John Bradshaw "Healing the Inner Child of Gays & Lesbians." RELIGION Church Calendar of Events Call First Some groups do nol meel during the holida) Friday- J 2127 • .. Your Sacred Self' ~ludy group us mg lhc best seller by Wayne Dyer COME learn more abou1 your sacred self, sacred Sl'i.ters & brothers , & 1he sac red. loving Creator God who made 11 so. Al Kingdom Communlly Church 862.7533 • Cathohi: Mass at 10 00 am at the Kolbe Pro­J< CI 522·81~2 Saturday -12128 \.1a• u Dignity Houiton at 7·30 pm 880· 2872 Sunday- J 2129 \hranatha Fellowship Metropol111n Church Services ·•A Study in the Gospel of Mark" and .. The T Factor ... (How 10 be a pos 1t1ve innuence on o thers •~ a w11neu for Chris1) 11 10:00 am Pr11se and Worship. Minis· try or the Word. Drama and Personal Ministry II 00 am at Marana tha Fe llowship 528·6756 • MCCR wonh1p servk:es 9 00 am & 11 00 am 861-91 49 • Worship Servk:e 11 ·00 am at Fa11h and Hope Fellowship 773 4429 • Grace Lutheran Church Sunday school for all ages at 9 :30 am Worsh ip Service 11 10 30 am 528-3269 • First Un111nan Un1ve rsalut Church Sun· day Servtces at 9 30 am a nd 1L30 am 526·5200 • Ser vices at 5 30 pm D1g n1ty C hurch 880· 2872 • Commu ntly Gospel worsh ip service 11 11 00 am & 7:00 pm SERVICE IN SEW UX'A· T ION 4305 L1lh•n 880-9235 • Houston Minion Church worship seno1ce 11 10 30 am 529-8225 • Kingdom Community C hu rc h • onh1p senu:c at II 00 am Sunday School 11 10 00 am 862·7S33 "The Cele)tmt Prophecy, An Eii:pe· nential Guide'" al 10 00 am am 526· 1017 • Church ot the XII Apostles worship service at 10 00 am Chapel of the Santana Funeral home. 5352 Katy F wav 665 7903 Monday- 12 30 • C11hollc Mass 11 7 30 pm Kolbe ProJeCI 522· 8182 • MCCR Handbell Choir Rehearsal al 7:00 pm 861-9t49 Tu esday-J 213 J • ~CCR Empowermen1 for Living support group & pot Jud. dinner at 6 00 pm, Gloryland Smgers 11 8 00 pm, The Gospel Ensemble at 6 00 pm 861·9149 • PROTECT meets at Bering Church 520· 7870 •HIV Afrec1ed group meets u 7 00 pm Judy or Pam at 880-923.S, HIV Infected 1roup meets 11 7:00 pm Catherine or Robert at 880·9235. At Community Gospel • Maranatha Fellowship MCC has home groups that meet m each 01hcrs home for a tune of fe llowship , sharing God 's word, and p ray er Call for 1he loc1 t1on in your area .S28·67.S6. • Advent Sc rip tu re Study 11 Kolbe Projec t. 7 30 pm 522 8182 Wednesday OJ /OJ • MCCR Bible S1udy 7 30 pm 861-9 149 •Worship Se rvice 7:30 pm 11 Faith and Hope Fellowsh ip 773-4429 • MCCR Jub1lat1on M 1ii:ed En~cmb lc meets at 6:30 pm Midweek uplift serv ice at 7 .00 pm, Bible Study, Lecture Serits & Choir Rehearsal 7 30 pm 86 1·91 49 • .. A Course 1n Miracles'' -S tudy Group usrng the book , pub lished by the Foundation for Inner Peace, whKh I~ aimed at removing the blocks 10 our awareness of one·, presence Ktngdom Community Church 1 30 pm 862 7533 Thursday-01 102 • Co\lcnan1 Bap1u1 Chu rch Worship o;.er... Bible Stud) 7-00 pm At Fauh AnJ Ht'rc hllow ecc I 30 pm and eJucauon hour 11 J 00 pm 6h8· ship 773· 4429 ~830 • Community Goipel m1dwed. sen·11:e 7 30 • Bering Mcmonal lJn11cJ MethoJ1u Chun:h I pm 880-9325 II yuu want u11 n~nt tuud 1n tlru wr-~ .. 1crvu.~ 10 50 an1 • r I n 9 I~ rrr;'ton pttaf~ ~on " ,..,fl STEVEN'S HOUSE WISH LIST • Storage shed (to be bu11l - $695) • Elec1ric Dryer • Hol Water Heater (50-60 gal Quick recovery) • Wall pictures/accessories • Cleaning products (Lysol spray, Lysol liquid, bleach, anti­bacterial kitchen spray. etc.J • Bedside table • Lamps {regular & floor) • 2 small student desks and chairs • Chest of drawers • 2 comfo rtable lounge chairs • Cordless telephone (900MHz performance) • Apartment m Montrose area for office and quarters for residents and guests Pl~:~~ 522-5757 VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED! Omega House, an eight bed residential hospice for individuals in the terminal stages of AIDS. Volunteers are currently needed on weekdays to help with supportive functions such as cooking, housekeeping and administrative assistance. If you are interested, please call Claudia Commo at 523-1146. aoveutise NOUU cbauch bene f ou as LoUJ as $68 .. 4 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27. 1996 NATIONAL NEWSNOTES Gay Group Comments On TV Ratings System Could Ellen Be Rated "0 bjec tio na ble "? Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Def­amat ion WASHINGTON, DC -Following an announcemenl loday by an independenl entertainment industry committee of lhc adoplion of an aged-based 1clcv1- sion raungs sys1em, 1hc Gay & Lesbian Alliance Againsl Defamalion (GLAAD) expressed cau1ious op11m1sm that 1he new system would not distin· gu1sh between heterosexual and gay content According 10 1ndusiry insiders. 1he age­based rat111gs sys1em is not designed to discourage crea11on of lesbian and gay 1hemed programming. Concern that a content·based ra1ings sys1em would have resulled in an1i·gay and-lesbian bias surfaced earlier 1his year amid reports that Motion Picture Assoc1at1on of America President Jack Valen11. who heads 1he 1elevision ratings comm1ttee, had met privately with members of the conservative Media Research Cen1er. an an11-gay hate group. B3'ed on tha1 informa11on , GLAAD ''t.ucc.J a pre.;!\ release in June ind1ca11ng HS deep concern that a biased ratings sy .. tem would place gay telcvis1on con4 1en1 in Jeopardy. GLAAD called upon Mr. Valenti to not allow the forces of anti·gay h1eo1ry to 'way the telev1sion rat111g s process In a June leuer of concern to Valen11, GLAAD asscr1cd 1ha1 "A biased ra1rng sys1em could be dcvasu11ng in an indusiry 1ha1 is JUSI now beginning 10 deal in an hones! and for1hrigh1 manner with our commun11y." Members of GLAAD's Board of Direc1ors mel facc-10 -face wi1h Mr. Valcnii in July 10 discuss lhc ra1ings process. GLAAD's Managing Director. William Waybourn slrcssed 1ha1 "gay and les­bian issues are an important pan of the national discourse and consciousness. so ii 1s 1mportan1 that television stan­dards, and the comm11tee tha1 decides them, unders1and and address lesbian and gay concerns fa1rly." Mr. Way­bourn categorized the meeting with Mr. Valenti as exrremely productive. .. While we remain concerned that any rat­ings system runs the risk of restricting our righ1 10 free speech. GLAAD is pleased that the television ratings system announced 1oday is no1 designed 10 crop lesbians and gay images from te lev1 - s1on's picture of the American land­scape," said William Waybourn . "Throughoul lhe nexl 1en monlhs we will monuor the ratings system to prevent II from ever bemg used as a broad broom lha1 would sweep gay con1en1 under the rug and off of our television screens .. GLAAD 1> 1he na11on's lesbian and gay news bureau and the only national lesbian and gay media watchdog organizallon. GLAAD promolc< lair, accuralc, and 1nclu~1ve reprc~cntatwn as a means of challenging d1scrimina11on based on se~ual or1c1Hatwn or uJentlly. Court Refuses To Remove Custody By CIIRISTOPllER WILLS Auon trd Put Writ~r Pekin, Ill . (AP)-Taklng two heallhy happy children away from !heir bisex ual mother and her female fo\.·er would v10· late Illino1s law a state appeals court ruled The 3 rd D1s1ric1 Appella1c Couri refused Tuesday to remove custody fr<lm the mother and award It tn her ex-hus­hand, 11011ng 1ha1 slale laws 1rea1 homo sexual and hetero~exttlal paren1s the same in custody matters .. There was no evu.Jence that the mother !'i living arrangements were unstable or 1ha1 1hc cl11ldren lacked a familial rela- 110nsh1p where lhey were.' Justice Peg Bre..;lln wrote ~O n the contrary. the evidence C\tabli hed lhat the mother provided a nurturing home environ menl for 1he c hildren •• The fa1her's lawyer, Wilham Anderson IV. said his cilenl planned to appeal . calling 1he ruling "more of a pol111cal dec1s1on than a legal decision •• Rebecca Schroeder flrli.l won custody of her children m 1991 when her <even year marriage ended Two years later. she moved in wuh a woman Ex·hu-;.band Stu ~ arl Schroeder rcmarr1ed and lhen filed for cu~tody A T3lewell Counly judge gran1ed cus­wdy to the fa1hcr las.t January. cuing "'the burden of social condemnation he believed the children might face . But the appeals courr noted 1ha1 two psy­chnlog1, ts examined the children and found the arrangemcnc was not causing emot1onal problems Teachers testi lied lhe boy, 9, and g1rl, II, were doing well an school Other children may 1ease or shun the 1wo hecauiie their mother is buexual, the courl acknowledged but lhey may do that whe1her 1hey live wuh 1he mo1her or fa1her. The Houston Symphony The llousion Symphony opens 1he new year wllh Shell l·avoruc Masters con cell' "Mol3rt, Haydn & Bach" show· ca~ang four member\ of the Houston Symphony performing works from 1he Baroque and early Classical perwd, under the <lirectwn of famed early music specialist N1chol3' McGegan Prin c1pal flullsl Aralee Dorough will per­form the Quant1 Hutc Concerto in G maJ<H Robert Alherhoh . principal oboe, will play JS. Bach's Oboe d'Amore Conccr10 In A mBJOr, princtpal bas­soo01s1 Bcn1anun Kamrns w11J perform I I.he Bas~oon Con.c.:erto in h minor by Vivaldi: and p r incipal horn1st Wll· ham Ver Meulen will play lhe Haydn Horn Conceno No. I in D minor. Mr. McGegan conducts from the harpsichord in the Quanll, Bach, and V1vald1 concerios Opening and clo,.ng lhe program arc 1wo works hy Moran · The Overture to la C/tmtn:a di T110 • and Symphony No. 31. PaflS Concerts are at 8pm Saiurday, Jan. 4, and Monday, ~an 6. and 31 2 JOpm on Sund>}, Jan . 5 l·or t1cke1s and tnfor· ma11on, call 713·227-ARTS or 800-828 ARTS . lieatry aad Soiree .Aabergiae present N~J'{ YEAR'S EUE ABO/IRD ~HE S.S. POSEIDOllV We're 6onna Turn You Upside Down! $£flp£ HORNS LLooflS 'NTIN£ AMPAGHE 8~ \\~1s ,6 c~~~~/Jr b L£1s SbeHey W-mters Look-Alike Contest at 12:30 SUN DA\' MALE STRIP CONTEST with Black. Ye/Yett at llpm Wednesday ittale Strip Returns On January 8 BOY TOY DANCERS SEVEN NIOllTS A WEEK NEW YEAR'S DA\' Open atZpm Black-Eyed Peas, Cabbage ff Cornbread Baifet The Aley ea re re!iienls A SPECTACULAR NEW YEA.R'S EVE TT Tuesday, DecemLer :51, 1996 Tid-h indude ...... -c:oncert Luffet and d ancing. Special hotel and dinner pad..ag- a 't'ailaLle. Ticllets now on sale! C all 713 - 228 - 84-21 . HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 5 Why Conservatives Should Embrace The Gay Gene By CHA..,DLER BLRR TIU! Wally St<JN/arri I recently wrote a book on the b1olog1cal search for the origins of homoscxualuy In us fina1 chapter. I descnbcd some rather amazing work being done at two biotcch companies The first is trying to manufacture a computer chip out of human DNA to tell you exacrly whar genes you have, while the second is crcat· ing artificial viruses that can send new genetic material into your cells The chap· tcr is utlcd .. How Genetic Surgery Can Change Homosexuality to Hetcroscx­uahty." and rhc 01hcr week I received the following letter about it from a 38-ycar· old lawyer " Do you know of any research institutions thu arc currently studying the possibil· ily of convcrung homosexual men 10 het­eroscK. ualuy., •• the lawyer asked .. 1 ,.ould be very 1nteres1ed in making such a change. I am gay. and for personal reasons 1N0Ukl like nor to be. My tlloughts on 1h1> don't come from a religious perspecuve. and I don•1 bel1e ... e homosexualiry p; somt thUlg 10 be ashamed of. I have gay friends, and I ha..,e been out to my famtly for 18 years. I'm happy m many aspects of my life but for a variety of reac;ons homosexuality is not for me •• I never entenained the hope of changing since everything I have read about changing through traditional psy· chotherapy suggests the chances are slim to none. I've always experienced my homo~ sexuality as 1mmutablc-somcth1ng deeply a pan ofmc Bur your book was the firsr Chang r ... e read \lioh1ch ga\'e me hope ""I \lrould tra ... cl JUSt abou1 anywhere and would volunteer for ·guinea prg• status, assuming a sane level of nsk If you don"t know of anyone currently doing research, how might I best keep myself informed of con­tinuing de'telopments" Frankly, I would like 10 be the firs1 on lme the minu(C some fonn of ueument becomes available ·· RapM:i advances 1n gcneuc rec;earch and bio ~ technology may well make u possible to take what the la"'ycr describes as ' 1mmu1a- Musical Entertc\in e Miss C AMP AMERKA' Be 1 er& ble"' and chani!e It If lhesc two b1otech com ~ panics are successful. the lawyer m1gh1 find himself in a doc1or'.s office wnhin a decade or 1wo The doctor will have a syr ~ inge loaded with millions of engineered viruses He will inject them into the law­yer's blood Slream and <end hrm home. And one morning. maybe six months larer, the lawyer will wake up-and his internal ori­enution. his instinctive romantic and sexual attraction, will be heterosexual. What makes this scenario possible is the discovery that sexual orientation is a biological rrau. produced by a "gay gene .. Conservatives who dislike homo­sexualny ha\'t always hated the concept of a gay gene and argued agains1 it. But this is because conservaci..,es do not undersland what ns existence really implies · The gay gene 1s a remarkable vindication of con­servau.., e ideas about human narure and may offer one of the most de ... asta11ng refutat ­ions of hberahsm we have yet seen. Right now, mos1 conservatives arc unaware of this, as they are also unaware of the clinical research-all but universally accepted among b1olog1srs-showing that homo · sexuality is a biological trait Conser4 \'aUves need both to face this research and to understand how It works for them Ever since homosexuality became an issue in the United States 30 years ago or so. there have been three competing positions on 11. POSITION I Homosexuality IS a chosen •lifestyle," ltke vegetar1an1sm POSITION 2: Homosexuahry IS a dis­ease, l1k.e schizophrenia POSITION 3 Homosexuality IS hke lefr · handedness . and IS neither chosen nor parholog1cal Secular conservatives tend to accept Position I and/or Pos111on 2, which means lhat e"ery new piece of lab research on the gay gene "ets their teeth on edge But say thal sci· ence had concluded Posnion 3 was a mauer of fact There 1s no question 1hat conc;cr ... a - 11ves would suffer a short-1erm loss It 1s THous~ always painful when you have committed yourself to a belief that 1s l11erally proved untrue, and enemies of conservausm would play "gotcha' ' for a while But what the Right fails to comprehend is 1 that a conservatum unrem11tingly hos ­tile to homosexualtty and truly commit ­ted to the resurgence of conser\lative rhoughr wirh real impact on public policy can, and should. embrace rhe gay gene. which will bring conservatives two long ·term gains . First, the shon·term loss . For every trait they study, clinicians and biologists rou ­tinely assemble a " trait profile," the sum total of all the data they have gathered clini­cally (from observation) about a trait Herc is a brief summary of one tran profile The trait shows up 10 1he populacion as two " orientations .. Ninety·two percent of the population has 1he majority oricnta uon Eight percent has the minori1y orien· tation The trail 1s non- pathological and unchosen. and the minority orienta· t1on runs in families with what geneticists call a "maternal effect .. (meaning the gene is probably on the X chromosome, which men always ge1 from their mothers) . It is her· irable, as demonsrrared by the fact thar identical twins, who are natural clones . arc far more likely to share the minority ori· entation than siblings who are not twins Neither orientation correlates with social environment, family structure. religion, or culture Role models. two­parent families. d1\lorce, and other env1· ronmental influences can1 t "make you " have 1he minority orienta11on Through social or religious pressure you can force someone to alter the .. behavior,"' that is. the external expression of this trait But you cannol alter the internal or1entat1on ­the uait itself. The trau I ha"e JUSt described 1~ • handed ness . R11ht·handedness 1s the maJority orientation, left handedness. the mmoruy. But the uau profile of handed­ness 1s astonishingly similar to the trait profile that geneticists are assembling of ANN ERS human sexual or1enta11on Heterosexuality, the majority orien tation , accounts for roughly 95 percent of us, while homosexuality the minority orientation, accounts for S percent. (The "10 percent gay" figure has always been a statistical concoction of the gay . rights movement .) Clinical research shows that homosexuality IS clearly heritable. like left-handedness, and neither corre · !ates with any environmental fac1ors And the sexual orientation. like the handed ness. of adopted children bears no relation ­ship to that of adoprive paren!S (which means environment is not a factor) . Both show a "maternal effect" pointing towards the X chromosome. A much-dis cu<<Cd srudy done in 1993 by a ream ofgenell· cists at che National Institutes of Health (NIH) found a spot on. sure enough. rhe X chromosome that they believe contains a gay gene. The NIH team is now in the proc.;ess of pinpoinring the gene itself, which has already been regisrered by rhe name GAY- 1. • What docs this mean for conservatives? Here is the first long-renn gain One neuroan atomist I spoke with-a straight, pro· choice New York Ci1y liberal who favors total political acceptance of homosexu aliry-growled ... While (conserva11ves) can't win the disease argument, and they can't win the choice argument, admitting rhar (homosexualiry is) b1olog1cal and unchosen is their trump card . It means they've won on an argument that 1s still only on the horizon today; changing It Their people can immediately adopt a strategy of, 'Okay, let's fix it, let's eliminate tt ' " How this could be done 1s easily described After pinpom1ing the gene , the next seep 1s to find out what 1he protein 11 codes for actu . ally does And the biotech industry is already developmg a method that would allow doc1ors to msen a different \ltrS1on of that gene-what 1enet1c1s1S arc now referring to as STRAIGHT I-into human beings (Con1111ued on page 10} BERING (OMMUNI SERV E FOUNDATION For more infonnation call (713) 524-9304 6 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 COLUMNIST j News YouDidn'tSeeon TV B) Patricia :'liell Warren with that sword held to our throat. But an l·or months now, the news has echoed With Oscar-winning ac1 1s still an act, no mat­ter how brilliantly sequined in "sanc­tity'' II n11ght be an[:ry sound bytes from enemies of same­\ ex marriage . Homosexual nuptials. it's berng said . will tarnish the "sane Ill)" ot heterosexual marriage . Gosh do these folks ever read the news­paper'! Or a history book'! Marriage has already hecn deeply de-sanctified by ~l·n1ur1c' of festering heterosex­ual pragmat1'm AJm1t1edly 111) v1ewi; are colored by exprnoce !·or 16 years I tried to he the pcrte1..1 stnught wife . . gave it the old < ege tr) Hut I never felt ;acred-iust fe.t 'llore Jlld more stifled and d1shon­c: st \\ h n my tiomophob1c sprusr. tmally ' md uu• ht told me I was 'sick · .\1y 11r rnd on y v1su to a shrink revealed 11a c; 'Jared 111y spousi:'s opinion So I rJn rl.. n~y lifo. <i. vorce and co~mg ou \ 1log1s1 fu 1 o1d uonal values •• e .. m 10 toq;,e I le reJI '1 stor) u( ma rage C~ristlar. clVil zatiun was hilt b) royJl!y n~ nuh1"11y who saw m rr1age .:JS dynastic. People wedded 10, 111les wealth , leudal estates vas­~ als. hens t1) lmk empires and \\.111 wars I ~tel Hlg compulsory monogamy and .. h.1s1Jty helts v.cre invented to ensure lh•t a hu!<.hand pas,ed his power only to has geneuc ott1.ipring. While these mar­r .1ges \\Cre "-JHli.kled in holy wa1er by 1111n1Slers "'f .. heaven:· many of them '-'"Cre made 111 hell as the tortured his· tones ol blueblood families can tell U> When the Amcnc.an Revolution sep auted church and state. It also sepa­ra1cd marriage trom church control \1arr1age hecarne basically a c1v1I arrangement Today, many American nupt1ah ,1111 start with church bells. But 1hc "'sanu u y' of civil marriage 1s arguable. since 11 boils down to a list of hetcro,exual legaltttes that judges .111 rule on The~e 111clude 1nhcrtC<Jnce rights. lJX hreals, hospital visi ta ltoll, pensions joint custody-all thing' that homosexuals want too, and ••c told they can I have, in the name of sanl:iJt)."' S111ce when do the arbiters ul holiness"' include probate courts, ht<ip1tal recept1on1,ts company penswn plans u11J lhe IRS, Ameru::ans also rely on marriage for certain perks and conventenccs. For minors. getting married 1 .... a way ot t\aJ1ng parental custody for emhar r.useJ parents of a pregnant teen. !>hot· gun marriage (hopefully) preserves 1hc lamil) honor. Marriage can get you l"CC airline 1ran~I a dental plan. d1p­lo111a11c JH1vllege.._, tree housing on mllllar) bases, US. c111zenship. the hnss's daughter, and slave labor in the 1111111 ot lots of kid,. Marriage routinely enhance' a ccleh11ty career, even serves .1s i.:oH~I 101 some CIA 1ntell1gence v.,orl Repeated marriage and·divorce .11Jow\ MH11C tolh to cloak "exual adven ~ 1ure 1n le~ality. Years of livmg toge1her 111 --common Jaw can equal mar11al \1<1tu~. or at ka!ot get you a nasty "'palt­mon)"' la\HUll To the man ur woman who m.ur 1es lor nice- things, marriage may CljUal prnstitutH>n Interestingly enough. homosexuals don't have to monopolize the closet Marriage is a good place for certain straights 10 hide 100. Like the prosti· tute with heart of gold who hides her past by marrying Mr. Respectable w11h heart ol gold. Or the '"missing person" who hides in a marriage to slart a new life, and cover the trail. Or the straight mili· tary man who grudging!} marrie!> to advance: his career, bccaust'.' 1'1e brass don ' t 11ke 10 promote hachelN' 10 •dm•ral Marriage has no glohal agreement about what makes 11 "sacred•· It's social sill)· putty squished 1~10 • lhousand shapes by b as and blt1d belief fo the Israel· ues of tt\c fen ('rmmandments .. sant:· 111y' of marriage included polyga'll) , and a mans righ1 to kill his "'fe and child· ren 1f they got out of line. To feudal lords, the .. i;acredncss" ot a !ierf weddrng required the bride to give her virginity 10 the lord To the American t.:olo111s1'. a woman could work her wa) into mar r1age through contract labor or herng an tndentured servanr. To Southern sla­veowners. marriage wa!!i out of bounds for hlack people. To my Irish Catholic forehears the marriage knot required a priest's ••authority." To my Protes­tant torehears. Catholic t.acraments were "'evil popery,'" so only a preacher's words could authorize the knot. But to bride and groom on the high seas, a ship captains authority is ••sacred· enough Some of my native American forebears had more scn ,1ble views. A couple srnod be fore Crea tion and married each other on their own authority as human being< They had no concept of herng married hy lhe power of some other pe r son·.., rc l1g1on o r autho r ity. '"Nobody tell' a Cheyenne what to do," my cousins used to say. If things went bad, all the aggrieved person had to do was put the partner's moccasins out­side the teepee door .w11h the toes po111ting away Can today's American marriage over­come Its sorry history as a list of perks., Can a person today male 11 sacred and wonderfuf'J Yes I believe so Real sacredness 1s 111tused into any relat1onsh1p only by the two people themsclve~. he they s1ra1ght or gay f'hc:y hurld a halance between their own sell·rcspect and their respect tor each other-and for chc1r children, at they have them. If this sacrednes.; 1s not deeply felt on the personal level, no law or sermon or tax hreak can put II there! Not even God and Godde"' Not every heterosexual wants this kind of relat1onsh1p. Not every homo· 'exual doe' <1ther But those who do deserve the best that marriage can offer. So ye' • marriage in the '90s 1s darkly tarnished But denying marriage to ga) men, lesbian~. bisexuals and trans­gendcred people will not untarnish 111 Heterosexuals have to take respon· sih 1l11y for the mess they've made of marriage. They were the ones who wa nted 10 have marriage They have 'Pent 3000 years making 11 a iuggernaut of Judaeo-Chr1!<.t1an empire, pollt1cs. patriarc hy. propcrcy, including their " n ght "' to control of wife children and aenellc her u age. Now, 111 the u ltimate paradox, h e t erosex u a l ~ may actu· ally need the help of u< homosexuals, if they want to put !-.Ome sacrednes~ back m marriage. Pa tricia Ne ll Warren is a uthor of " The Front Runnt r " and o th e r bestselling books, as well as a wid ely publis h ed commenta tor. He r publisher is Wild­cat Pres•. Copyright (c) 1996 by Patri­cia Nell Warren. All Rights Reserved 1997 a new year is on it's way and who knows what it will bring ... isn't it nice that some things stay the same? such as LOBO's everyday discount on new books 20% discount on new hardbacks 10% discount on new paperbacks Fvorn;~ }taff ~ ~ofL<913<9 ff.A PPY NEW YEAR LOBO BOOK SHOP 3939-S Montrose 713-522-5156 \re 1hesc profane perks protected hy state and lcderal law" Yes. Are they sac1cd 0 llardly. It" amusing to think h '" man} hctcro"cxual Americans would ''ream hlood> murder 1f they lose 1he11 right' co this array of conven- 1cl1l:C' Yee they would turn around and Jcny 1hose same perks to gay people. Closet marriages go beyond perk, rnto p1evJr1cat1on. ""Closet'' 1s how hnnH1,c:tual' h1stor1cally con· formed to the old feuda l mandate ~ohod) tries harder to make marriage "'"rk, than a lag or dyke or b1 who is hell· hent to pass! We have even pumped out children 10 he cannon fodder for fcua Jal1sm Indeed. the gay communuy's lo'te ot drag. and theater may be in~t1lled 111 u~ hy long- centuries of performing nvv.:> o vi. vvovE I DECEMBER 27. 1996 7 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT Best and • Worst Ill Movies Tht Bur fS/uptrs} By JO'i A'iTHO'iY The Best I Sleepers -No contest This captivat­ing drama is by far 1he best film of the year Robert De S1ro 1s magnificcnl as a priest who goes through emotional connict between hts religious vows and the bond of friendship The brilliance of his perform· ance speaks volumes in a scene where he his being .sworn in as a wuness as the camera pans between hrs facial expressions and the Bible. Jason Patrick and Brad Put co-star in this film about four young men and their hor .. rid childhood e:tperienccs in a reform school 2 Flirting With Disaster -Ben Stiller is wonderful m this unconventional film Stoller s!Jrs as ~lei Coplin, and adoptec who sets .,ut to fmd h s 1>1ological par­ents The ensuing pandemonium 1s rtol­on w, ti a stellar cast me uding Mary Tyler Moore L y Tomhn and rmng star Tea L.cc::i1, this 1s a wh1ms1cal delight aptly v. ru en rnd directed wuh sens b1h y by David 0 RuS<cl 4 1 The First \\''es Club - A masterp1ccc u lS ot h 'A.IS n 1 tended robe a classu: 11 "as designed '"' nale you laugh- .ind t does Be ·c M1dler. Gol~ e !lawn and Diane Kea ton g vc ... a cer "CV vmg pe· J. manl.:es m this hys er1cal romp Keaton 1s the "Ur prise ho\\evcr M1dler and Ha\\-n h~ve already dei· onstratcd to the public and cnt cs that they arc comic geniuses but Keaton's ab1l1ty at understating com· edy shined through As a result, her career has seen a resurgence as of late-well deserved, I might add This comic tour de force was the year ... first blockbuster hll and was one of the more memorable films of the year 4 Independence Day -Already the sec­ond largest grossing film in history, Independence Day compelled audi-ences to their scats. Wll Smuh got Holly· "Wood's attention in this big·budget adventure film Expect to ~cc more of him this year The special effects were fresh and exciting Independence Day is as good as tt gels for tbis genre 5 JOI Dalmatians -The marketing coup of 1he year Disney used all us muscle for thi~ updated version of the animated classic Merchandi)e t1e-in's, clo1hing lines, etc. No matter where you went, you were inundated II worked Dalmatians had the b1ggcs1 opening weekend of any film in history Glenn Close was dcli­c1ou~ ly evil as Cruclla De Vil Dalmat· ians was meant to be an escapist fantasy and it procured the goods 6 Twister -Steven Spielberg docs it a~ain Twister, while thm on plot, swept into theaters and stirred a frenzy. It wa~ excit­, g. mindless enter1a1nmcnt that played on your worsl fears and the public's desire to see catastrophe The real star of th1' film was the special dfecu and they were rivec­ng Helen Hunt stood out as the films bcro· nc She c n be seen tn an upcoming film wnh lock N 1chc.soo 7 l ralnspoltin~ T uly one of 1he years n1 s· original f 'ms An amoralist1c talc sJrroundrng the depths o add1ct1on in \-)1; I "'Id 'rte film leave~ Ve y lew add1c .ior.s un u ned- alcohc:1sm drug abJse tpr1ma" y hcrc;'."IJ and nu.:.otine It s an aes1he•1c f m that re~ona c' in your mmd "cgardl~ss o• your pt"rfional rooral fo ti tudc Movie' are suppose to circulate the brain on occu1on and thh film accom plishe~ ju.!it that 8 Ransom -This Ron Howard film star· ring Mel Gibson is mesmerizing It's intense, realistic. pompous and chill· mg Throughout It all you fell as though you've been on an emotional roller coaster ride and you have. One of Gib<on's best per­formances 9 Star Trek: First Contact -Re<istancc is futile. you must sec this movie The film incorporates all the clements that a fan of the genre would love. Lots ofac11on, the Borg and overall excitement Our resident trck:ky Carolyn says u is a must see I 0 . Swingers -A terrific comedy about - young guys m L.A on the prowl Vince Vaughn redefines cool and ~exy and Jon Favreau convincmgly portrays Jon Fav­reau is a standout as the self·p1tymg hero in this lasciviously funny film The Worst I Beavis and Butthcad -Sec our man about town, Christopher Lundquist's. review in issue 843 of Tht llouston Voict Chri< sums up the absurdity of this film in the title of his commentary "uh . uh huh .. uh hu huh .. this <ucksl" Enough said 2 Da)light -Stallone m another ac11on adventure This one '' a tunnel. llow 1magina11\le llh. ex.cusc me how boring and stupid Stallone's sav ng grace ts that ~IS '!lov1es make big mone} m Europe so the studio's shell out big bucks for him to keep churning out th ts Junk llollywood should do us all a fa\or ld JUSI release them m Europe and qull inundating CJll' screens ,. h the Stallone's latest aucmpc at resurrec1 ,g .. s '"' king of awon f Im• ' Stftus 'lc,.s Has~ Sly The mantle has been paned Mme on vey, oh no please To be sure Greg Kinear is pleasing to the eye s but why can·1 the )(U d1os find an appropriate vehicle for his comical talents He .shined in las1 year·s Sabrina Tim Conway is the films saving grace, but even a comedian of his 1mmea1;, urable talents can't save this concoc· tion It's a sad commentary when 1his is the best Hollywood has to offer one of this countries greatest comedians . Conway deserves more respect 4. The Mirror Has Two Facts -Streisand passed on Larry Kramer's The Normal Heart for this' Amazing' What was she thmkmg Obviously, u was poor choice taking box office receipts into consideration This is the first bona-fide bomb m the illustrt· ous singer/actresses career We expect more from the ultimate diva. Hopefully, we'll receive the goods on her next project · a sequel to The Way We Were wuh Robert Redford . Can't wall . 5. Spece Jam -Sure u made buffo amounts of money. Warner Bros has what could be one of filmdoms major assets-Looney Tunes Why, then, did they utilize thc<e legend­ary animated characters in such a ridicu· lous contrived film which is more of an auto· biography of Michael Jordan than any­thing else. Because of the revenue It ascer· tained, the studio is already planning another Looney Tunes venture I hope It lives up to its moniker. 3 Dear God J"he rnle 5a)S 11 ull, on 'f The WorJI (Dear God) "'".ih a J1'ferrn1 empha~1i; as to con · ------·:/., :,-.--= sC.o ' llJ1°'1 Ool}/g ~L- ------------- HOUSTON, TEXAS Grand Opening! ~e~ . Formerly The Past Time .I/. .l\eiv \J00~ New 0 w n er! ltitlJde Come Join Us on Wednesday, January 15 at 12 noon 617 Fairview (at Stanford) • Houston • (713) 528-8102 COLUMNIST Gay Today BJ GLE1' WEBER nu, ha~ been a very nice but quiet Christ· mas ~ea~m for me I have been to a few nice parnes. The P.W.A. Christmas party held ar Bering Church was wonderful . Ray We;t , PW.A.'s resident hunk. erm:ccd a fun evening. I was blessed wi1h ,ce111g so many people I know. I even won a raffle prize. They were giving away heau11ful Polo 1ype shirts. I asked God if I could wm one, and one minute later they called my number. For tho:-.e ot you who thmk I have gone off the edge of religion righteousness, let me ~a) I have never been more happy and at peace wuh my~elf For the first ume, my rclat1onsh1p w11h God has given me hope. I will heat the AIDS virus. What I also J1le " the high qual11y of the men and women who go 10 M.C.C.R. The:-.e are peo· pie who ha\IC JObs and hves . It 1s wonder· tul to go 10 church and have everyone l_!lad w see me and uk how I am doing \.h hnol 1s coming along at a fast pace. I h;ve already decided where I will hold my llr-.. t hook ''going. I know all of you will !)e ph.:a,cJ hy my clloro.. and my hope 1s n will help you dear reader> who are still bat· 1ilng with the reality of 1he AIDS virus. As I havl' !'!a1d hctorc. I am beating the dis­ease and I know all of you can beat it as "ell I would hke to say a few good words about one f my favorite people. Kathie Lee Gifford She has gotltn a lot of bad press coverage f"or some thing:.. she was not 1espLo11\1hle tor. hut she gets very lmlc 1,;ove1agc for the projects from her hearl Yes. I Jo get up ever) mornmg to \li.Utch Reg11 mrd Kathie l.ee. It 1s an emer4 1ain111g lwu f,Jlcd wnh Jove and laugh· 1er I even love her singing. What 1':.tth1c I.cc has Jone 1' take a m1ll1lln Jolla rs of he o" n money to found Cas­s1Jy's Jlouse. a homc tor AIDS and crack hah1c' You can only 1mag1ne what a crack hahy rnu>I go through to heat it's addic- 111111 She 1s now geu1ng hi open Cas ,1Jy's Ilnu'e II. We need everyone. c'pec1all) with money. to help us and our cl11ldrcn will tlm ballle. I would like l!l Qn'l11nate Ka1t11e Lee for Human1tar - 1i111 ul the Year. In a column a while hack, I criticized award ~hows "'here all the audience wore red r1hhons I thou~ht 11 was a meaning­less cllort to •how support for AIDS peo· ple . Red r1hbons only . have meaning when 1he v.earers are srncere. I would rather nol people "ear 1hcm 1t they are not rnterested an our cause I 1cctnll) talked to a friend ol mme m Cal· 1fornia. He called my folks to get my number. He has Jived almost 15 years with the AIDS virus. After about two years of bad health and hospital stay<, he 1s now very healthy. He cats only health foods, drinks vegetable juices for cleansrng, and meditates several hours a day. I envy him. I would hke to learn to medi· tate myself. My courtyard in my new com­plex looks like a tropical island with a pool. That would be a beautiful quiet place to meditate. He 1s Jookmg forward to another healthy year His new lover 1s HIV~nega1ive. and my fnend says he is a great support. He 1s excited for my column and calls me a hero. I thmk he 1s the hero. He sets an example for me and all those he touches with his Jove of life and his determ111a11on to beat the virus . I hope I <et that example for you dear reader~ I had a wonderful lime at the M. C C R. Christmas party. Our choir ha. the most beautiful voices I have ever heard . h reminds me of the Angel> singing. So much JOY filled the church What a great place to he I have said this before I you don't like where your life 1s now, and you are uncertain of your future. come see us at M.C.C R. I am now an the right track and I am happy. Even my folks. who worry so much ahoul rne, have now relaxed and are also happy for me . Hawaii, and other 'tale!<! are now trying to legalize gay marriages. I think It ts a mis ~ take for two men to legally hind them· :-.elves together. What 1f you marry some­one who is only afler your pohe!<is1ons. and files for divorce. You stand 10 lose everything I think the commnment ceremonies available to loving cou­ples I\ beau11ful enough. H two lovers ,omm11 1hemselves in their heans and ~oul!:i. that should be enou8h. 1 lnow many of you d1,agree with me. bu1 why lose ii all Ill some little hustler. Look at all the rich old men who marry sexpots only to have 10 be ordered CO &1ve up half of lhe1r wea lth 10 1he'e women. As my 43rd year approaches, I can truth· fully say I am no longer afraid of death Pain , yes . Death , no. I am certain I will live a long time , and that I can continue co help those of you with my AIDS mmr>try through my column and book The great· est JOY I get "knowing I have pornivcly helped people with their lives. I am >O blcs-ed by God, and all of you dear read­en~ who let me into your homes e\·ery week to !>hare with you my thoughh on heating the viru>. I w15h all of you a healthy New Year, and please keep in mmd we are all m this together J love you all You can't get HIV from a telephone, c;::::J {f?i L::_J but you can get prevention. E1lucat1on u the '1rs1 ucp 10 prnnl!DI lhc aprtaJ e>f UIV. 1he rlrw thJil cawcs AIUS \\1th JWI ope pboae ~II you C3fl ha\'C !ht Amen~an keJ Cross teach you and your fellow woc .. en how IO•\OlJ nkcuon N" one h" more npc11cnce 1c;ach1ng htallh anJ atifrty th.an the Red C'ross I or decades, -.c\c cJu· UIC'J -.or .. C'n lhtouah. Ci'K tra.in1ng ud workpllCC hcal1h anJ safety -.ourM"S So s•~e us a call Bc~auw: w11hou1 •cure ch.anain,: bm.Jyior as ihc 011ly way we can Pop lhc virus To a<:hedW. an HIV/AIDS educetion HUion tor your workplace, or to obtain poster•, brochut'M IOd other INterials, call ~ Greater Houston A,... Red Crose. (713) 526-8300 Education lhlt WOfka, from a name you can trust. +Arnwlc.n Reel Croaa WORKPlACE HIV/AIDS PROGRAM ____________ __, The Campus 1(partments $39S bdrm. apts. surrounding a courtyard, access gates. Karen for serene limited Call move-in specials. 4207 Mt. Vernon 528-5218 Exd1;sivE LESbiAl'i/GAy CAMPGROL'\d OpE"I All YEAR I Pns WElcOME 150 ACRES of SEdusiON ON LAkE LiMESTOl\E 1-888- 875-7596 ~oil F"rcc E • N 2923 Main Houston 522-0000 Check Out Our Long Power Hour and Low Prices Noon Open to 9:00 pm 7 Days a Week ALL WELL/BEER/WINE $1.75 Now that we're the ONLY bar in the 2900 block of Main, we have plenty of FREE lighted parking. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 9pm till ?? ~ • Guest Bartenders on the "TOP" ~~ .. ~ Houston Area Bears ~ .-::::~. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 29, 5pm till ?? ,e .• \;..~' Cookout on the "FARSIDE" ~J. Houston Council of Clubs Guest Bartendang TUESDAY, DECEMBER 31 NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY Champagne Toast at Midnight Complimentary Party Favors NEVER A COVER CHARGE HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 9 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Best and Worst in Music 8) JO'\ A:".THO'\\ The Best tah' 1111s lady has a sci ot pipe a11d that tS what sets her apart from the other Streisand wanna bes pure and simple Dion's compositions do not all sound alike She's an original and m an indus1ry that has become formulaic, 1hat 1s wise At 1his rate, Dion should have Ion gev11y 4. The Fugeu --One of 1he years besi selling albums, this group incorporated soul with rap and reaped major success. Their version of 1he Robena Flack clas51c Kil/mg Mt Softy W11h Hu Song was fresh. caichy and melodic A wonderful •lbum Lei's hope their fol· low-up can maintain thar level of original 4 lly 5 Ani DiFranco Wow Her gender bending aside, 1h1s IS one talented \\Oman She s a murure of punk and folk "uh a br.ll1an1 musical 1nterp .. etauon Hcm:­mus1c will S\\eep you away with us 1nsur gent lyrical con rent She 11 an inv g orating artist that has promise 6 Evita Soundtrack -She may no1 be Patll accordingly Her biggest fan and promoter is Reba McEntire Twain incorporates rock 1n:,1rumental's into her country reper· wire in a manner that 1s new and inv igorat 1ng 9 Tina Turner -The 56 year old songstress released a new album and ~hawed of her legs for Hane's panty ho(je Turner does a mes· merizmg duet with S1ing and her cover of Missing You is vin1age Tina She's a rock legend and class ac1 JO. Cher --Okay. •o I may be a bu prejudice Sure, rm a fan But how many artists s1and the test of lime like this diva does Not many Shes been churning ou1 records for 30 I MAnn Rimes The linle girl who could­aod did R me.s stormed 1nro the music scene twirling bke a ba1on wuh her album Blue The 14 year old phenomena has become a housc­hoki name. pr mart y as a result of her vocal prowess A mature sou,dmg adolesce~11. Rimes can nterprct a song lik:e a seasoned veteran and she demonstra(es Just tha1 on her ench>nling duel w11h 1he legendary Eddy Arnold who came out of retirement to record wnh mus1c•s b1est sensation If on~y 1hey would lei her be you1hful 1n demeanor. Rimes looked like a 30 year old diva at the Country Music Awards, when 1n essrice she •ho~ d have been able 10 look h>e the reenager she and perform her music as only she can This one here for the dura uon rhar u a given LuPone bu1 Madonna Tht BtJt (Ani D1Franco) kno"" s how to incor years, most of them hits and the industry ignores her Obviously. 1he public likes v.hu 1hey hear. Suliry and 50, Cher·s new album h's A Man'• World was a smash hu U1 Europe and 1he U S Never redundant In her muS1c the iconoclast tried her hand at hi energy dance murn.: and p1eva1led One by One mcke1ed to the top of 1hc Dance charts and the lat esl ~ingle, a cover of Tina Turner•s Paradic;c IS Here seem\ (0 be fol· 2 S)mbol Man -Emancipation 1s the an tsl formerly known as Prmce besr work m decades This guy 1s one of music s mosr underrated ge 1uses and the a bum u dcmonstrauve of such Wuh music runnmg the ga nut fr '1l pop to sJul to b ue s IO arrangements 1ha1 can only be assoc~3red wuh the artl.st It one f th.s yearli besr musical encounters 1 Cf'linr Dion Watch uu1 Whnney ~nd Mar poracc rhe ncccs sary cmouon A wonderful addauon to any music lovers collcc11on The real surprise here IS Antomo Banderas The man has a set of pipes and prov de5 1hc comp1la1 on w th a fresh sound 7 .\Janis MorrisfUt She was t~e b1ggcs1 force 1n music this year Three II singles. mult1-ptaunu-n album sales and the video queen of chc year Again lc1 s see 1t her fol low up mcc1s cr1t1cal muster 8 Shani• T"'ain Her dcbu: album has become the b1ggcs1 selling country album ot all 1 me 10 mill.on cop cs sold The 1nduscry ignored her th•s year at 1he usual award ceremonies and ha\le bct-n scoldc4 12/JS ~f * ~ * ll:OOpm * J OP \_)t d 5atupd udde * * QlJ Sho~ * Miss * MC Emerald Star * '* Mcunlain B lue Legacy P roducl ions lowing in the \amc direct on Just when everyone 1s about 10 wnre lhlS woman off she turns around a makes anorher comeback The wort\.ln has staymg power and she knows ll So do we The Worst I \tichael Bolton Enouih already' Bolton's strained voca s arc mgraraat ~g and unncrvang Listening 10 his Chrntmas a1bu~ was pure rerror Hearing Bollon do rcnd1t1ons ot .such classics as 0 Holy /\"1gh1 n disgraceful Please M1chac-I, record some ncv. songs and quite revn:ing genuine cLus1cs Be11er )'ti, s11ck. 10 wr111ng mustc-you"rc much heller 1u 11 Thank You 2 Reba McEntire - He) before you Reba fan's assauh me. let me make n clear. I adore this woman That said. I must confCS!I I was disappointed with her album Starting o .. tr ·a rehash of yesteryears stale hus The dance version of You Kttp Mt llangmg On was tolerable Reba is at her best clement wnh fresh new material thal we can associ ate with her She needs to leave 1he re· record ing of old hits alone. One Michael Bohon i< enough. Of course 1he difference is Reba can sing 3 Barbra Streisand --Again, I'm a tan Come on Babs, what's wnh the two song bu on an album we've been v.aiting on for some tune_ The two songs are far from the bt\t of her work In fact. the Bryan Adams duet IS sappy and unfortunately boring How much longer do we have to wan for a S1reaand album worth us 'A-eight 10 gold'> 4 George \fichael Again. we wan years while Michael settles his contract dispute wnh Sony to hear a new album worthy of his talents and he delivers this mixture of noth mg. Can anyone. excepl a die hard fan, recall a single song oft of the album that w;n memo rable' 5 Meat Loar -Listening to h 1s newest material. I can·t help but think the tire<l old adage: Been there. heard 1hat. Move on Meat Loaf, its the 90 s. 2 nh,A1ALE S fRIP CONTE T, ~ Ll J.f al ll:OOpm wilh Paiv1 < 11118 SATURDA \t SJ-10W J) of ll:OOpm wilh Roxanne \\.t- 1l\t \UoOUl\U\ ~ "'""1 J1~ H:0. 0P2m L. 11119 1 Budweiser & Bud I ighl S5 All Dog All Niqhl 51Jr3o~v1AL F STRIP CONTFST 2' of ll:OOpm wilh Poivi 1 12131 r _')A R r v I I 5 PARTY! - l=> ~RT-V! "~ 1/1 HapplJ_ ew Year! 2517 Rolph Slreel al \Xieslheimer (713) 527-9071 • Hopf-ll I cur 7 om-9pm wpe~.doy~ • l.')0 Well 4-7 Solurdoy • 1.50 \'od~n 7am-Epm • Mug Club 7um-JOpm • 3.75 P; lther~ & 1.75 Mug\ 10 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 Guun: ~IVI ~OH, J~VD{ ffiv~n~. ~ornHH{ Lu Lon, ~Lrn ~ DvH~nv G~~Httv'~ facod COLUMNIST Rainbow Reader By JULIE DEVLIN Tom Meeke r is a rookie priest who's been assigned to 1he nondcscrip1 rural par­ish of Co11onwood, Montana. Tom's work is preuy routine, in fact, down ­right boring, until Vidal Stump, a local biker half-breed w11h a reputation for troublemaking shows up at the church one hot Saturday evening 10 confess. Thus begins Patricia Nell Warren 's tor­rid gay classic, The Fancy Danca. recently reprinted by Harper Press. Tom 1s auracted 10 Vidal from the moment he sees him, but unable to process this for· bidden a11rac11on, he tells himself his interest is purely professional After all, Vidal 's propensity for trouble 1s well known in the town, and to convert him would be a definite coup for the young priest. who 1s still regarded with suspi­cion by both his head pastor and the lead· mg citizens of this small town diocese, one of whom has sworn vengeance on him for not supporting her efforts 10 ban "obscene" books from the high school library Vidal of course, makes no excuses for why he's suddenly become interested '" the church_ For, tn spite of an obvious wife and child, Vidal 1s gay. He is also '" love w11h Father Tom, and has been from the moment he first saw him. Since Tom isn't about 10 show up at any of Vidal's favorite hangouts, Vidal decides the best way to proceed is to show up at Tom's church. for confe~s1on and .. counselling •• It doesn '1 take Tom long at all to figure out wha1 1t 1s Vidal actually wan1s . Tom It seem ... want .. 11 to, hut 11 scares. him to death so he Hie~ to tell h1m!Oelf his feelings are JUM friendship ~e't he trie~ to pass them off a .. brotherly lo\-e. and finally he ~1m pl) Irie .. to tell himself their wrong Noth111g. hoY.c,er, \l.ork~ and before long lmn .anJ Vidal arc lnvrr ... In spuc of the I act that Tom Ill\ es Vidal w11h all h" more happiness in the realization of who he 1s than he ever found in his rehg- 1on, guilt cab away at him, causing him to indulge in all ,!,Orts of bizarre behavior 10 suve off hi< growing paranoia that he and Vidal are about to be found out. Not even a foray 10 Colorado (ostensi· bly 10 auend a pro life rally. but actually to be with Vidal for an extended period, and 10 auend a meeting of Dignity, an organization of gay Catholics), help him overcome this guilt which is begin­ning to tear at his relationship with Vidal. Meanwhile, hke something out of one of Tom's paranoid fan1as1es. the town book-burning terrorist has followed him to Denver, and has been shadowing him. Father Tom arnvcs home from his trip exhaus1cd and more confused than ever, only to find her biucr accusations hanging over his head . Vidal mean · while, tired of Tom's vacillating, and ready to leave town to finish his college education. isn ' t exactly being suppor· tive of his lover in his hour of need. In fact, Vidal has decided he really doesn't care who knows about his sexualily at this point. since he's most of the way out of town anyway and nae likely to return any­time soon How Father Tom handles what happens next, and how he and Vidal resolve both their differences and their sim1lari­t1es, males for a gripping conclusion Wonderfully cvo<.:at1ve of small town at11tudes, the Catholic reltg1on, and ga) hie prior 10 AIDS, The Fancy Dancer is a page turner from start lo fina~h. Any gay per .. on who's lived and lo\ed in a rural area v.dl he ahle lo rcla1e 10 \'1dal and Father Tom·~ dilemma F\·tn though 1h1" .. 1tir) v.as. v.r111cn nearly 20 )cars ago. 11 1 elale!ii eao;!I) lo today and mana~e~ to show s1multaneousl~ ho1h ho\I. far hi.:art .and 111 spite ol the fact thal he fmd~ V.l' "e con1P and hov. hr v.e'H· _yet 10 £,Q Stein continued ... <C "ontmueJ from front page) mg c.irecrs - I don't if 11 would have hap· pencd." As a percussionist, you don't play very much . And counting 1s important, you have to count all these rests ... so in the midst of counting, I am sitting there and I am watching 1he conductor and I am watching how one person can bring all these people together, how one person is bringing all these different musical voices together and make them a unified whole and obviously crea1e some1hing very beau­liful and something very exoiling. And in the midst of counting all my rests, that's when I said that's really special and, in my 15 year old precious mind, I said, 'I want to do tha1,"' laments Stem. Stein shared his vocational dream with his junior high school conductor and before long the band director let him conduct the pep band for the basketball game which "wetted" his appetite. "It was an addiction of the most positive sort," says Stein. By Jhe time he was a senior, he was privately studying wuh all three of the conductors of the St. I.outs Symphony. The first time he heard a symphony or­chestra. in the sixth grade with his class was an experience which, he claims, opened his heart and mind to the real beaut) of this art form I Its prunal) goal 1s to attract the younger gencrauon to the beauty of cultural arts. "We arc y,alking a tight rope between ti) mg to reach out in new comemporai: ways - not JUSt to young people, but to people who arc ) oung to the experience of the S) mphon) - and the other side of that tightrope is falling into trying to reach to far in compromising the essence and beauty and the tradition of what this art form is all about " Stein believes the Symphony may have an answer. "We've started a program called Casual Classics," says Stein. rhe premise is interesting indeed and re­ally quite imaginative. "Instead of a con­cert basically being a 2 and 112 hour per­formance with a 20 minute interm ission. it is now basically about 75 minutes with no intermission," he explains. "I serve as the host. I'm talking to the audience," asserts Stein. "Christoph con­ducted the first concert. so I also talked to him and let the audience ask him ques­tions. And, I went into the orchestra and asked them questions." According to Stem, the concept allows him to the let the audience into the Sym· phony's process and let's them reach out more directly to the audience so that there is more of bond forged. more of a link created between the public and the Sym­phony "Our particular art form is the most chal· lenging. ~t the Opera. they can sing in any language '" the world, all you have to do is look up and )OU know in tnglish from reading the subtub exactly what's going on. lhe ballet ts so visually oriented and when the story isn'I obvious, their miming th in gs I he A lie), of course, is a theater that speaks '" words And our art form requires you to Sil quiet!) and, '" terms of the visual acll\lly, we are at the Im' end of (C"ontrnwdon~ lJJ &mnces/ e~ - AND CoffEE Shop · 0 7~ ~ g'~ R,~11fcE YouR \_\W''1.~ ~ S .A LC> C> H EsERv11r; C ~~ I ~h,% :>~ (OpENiNG NEW YEAR s EvE) 11. "'' t~EW YEAR'S EVE W1a,~ 'NEVER BE 'iHE SAME! COME EAT, dRiNk & pARTY tTil you dRopl CouNrny Music ANd A qiANT dANCE flooR & LiNdA Low SMiTh's BANdl OUTRAGEOUS will bE prnfoRMiNG youR I. f fAVORiTE dANCE Music All EVENiNq. ~ PARTY f AvoRsl § BuffET! CltAMPAGNE TOAST! LivE ENTERTAiNMENT ~~~ SATURdAy, JAN. 4, 1997, 9:00 PIW ThE RoyAl, SovEREiGN ANd IMpERiAl CouRT of ThE SiNGIE STAR PRESENTS T~e C\ay 90s At<e Still C\oi~9 HosTEd by STEVE CkAiso,., CA!lodidATE foR EMPEROR XIII, Tke BIAck LEATkER DiAMO!lod Er.1peRoR CA,..didATE BeNEfiTiNG BREAST CA~CER AwARE1'ESS iN MEMORY o" MARio" PA,..HR * 1100 Westheimer * 523-7217 * HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 11 ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EVERY FRIDllY Ii SllTURDfiY MllLE DllltCERS 9pm to Tam Don't Cry For Me Madonna (bnwuM DoWllTOWM 6. MEdic.ol Cc11TH) CAR WAslt •· ExpREss LubE ~001 MAiN· ~21·9198 I 4~11 MAiN; ~29-~lH ' I ,-------------------------, FULL SERVICE $5·99 ':'$3·00 :.~-_;:~·~:.'~!:ii~~, CAR WASH wlcoupon :: off Plus F••• c .. Wash I' No appointment necessary. Includes: : Present coupon at time of service. • Safe Gentle Soft Cloth Wash 1\ Not vald with any other offers. / • w1nd'ows Cleaned Inside & out: '··aillir-Pr11els19iliCilrwicii-- • Interior Vacuum & Wipe Down • Fuel Injection cleank'!I • Air & Hand Dry I • Radiator power flush • Established 1949 I • Tire rotation State I Ask about Insp ection Featuria 1 Quaker state c Mon-Sat aam·&pm Express I • ~.d~-=~Y Sunday 8am-5pm Detailia I '=~:- olfer Vans and Suburbans Extra Expires 1/3197 Other INljor brand• of o~ available. Mon-Thu 8·5:30 • Fri-Sat 8·6 ExpirH 113197 ~ PastTime 617 Falrvl•w " 528-8102 " Falrvl•w at Stanford Man1 than~s to a\\ m1 friends for their \ove and support. 1'\ease stop in -----· -~--~--~--~- - ------ HOUSTON TUA! 8} DAVID RICHARDSON When I fi"1 heard that Madonflll was going to be portraying Evita Peron on the wode screen. I had a momentary concern that 1f thos trend keeps up, other pop stars may attempt to portray famous women in a musical format Shudders ran through me as I envisioned LaToya Jackson playing Winnie Mandela. Debbie Gib­son as Lady Bird Johnson; or even Cour· tney Love from Hole as a wacky singing and dancing Mother Theresa Okay, okay. back to Evola. For those unfamiliar with the !)tory, allow mt: to give you a brief synopsi!;. The movie open~ wuh an audience m a movie theater being notofied of the death of their political and spiritual leader, Evita Peron Amidst all the ensuing despair and grief, we sec a ~tohd figure m the form of Che (played brolloantly by Antonio Banderas) who acts as a narra· tor and Greek chorus to the story. He com· pares the madnes- of the public to a c or cus. Then we move into flashback terri · tory (and I must inject that the tran sitions between scenes seem awk ward. choppy, and at times a bot out of focus. a problem el1m1nated ons­tage by 1nterm1s­s1ons but one that should have been addressed by dtrec· tor, Alan Parker- Madonna Fame. The Commit· ments.) Hence, we have Evita as a dark hatred child defiantly breaking her way mto a chapel 10 t..ce her fa ther put to reM. and being that ~he was 1llcgit1ma1e, \he was somewhat less than welcomed by family members. Moving along. the movie takes u~ 10 later years where Evita becomes an amhu1ou~ young woman longing to nee her home with her mus1c1an lover and head to the big city of Buena!-i Aires. She convinces the singer Magaldi to take her and he does, then dumps her, leading to one of the mov­ies best ballad" ·Another Suitcase, Another Hall." Eventually. she becomes a model and goes through a ~erie\ of men she u!>cs to move> up Finally. at a charity beneftt she meets Colonel J uan Peron who is obviously on hos way up loke herself They join forces and she kicks Peron's mistress out in a hilariously bitchy rep· rose of 'Another Su itcase · Peron's views end° up get tong horn arrested but Evna comes to his atd, doing radio announcements in his favor directed at the working class. or the "'descam1sados •• as she refers to them. After Peron is released from iaol, he is elected president and on the balcony of the Rosa Cosada. Evita sing,. to the peo· pie. the classic song .. Don't Cry l'or Me Argentina .. when suddenly, instead of JUSt focusing on her singing the song, the film makers felt 1t necessary to treat us to an MTV style montage of the first half of the film. as of we couldn"t remember. This, I found to be extremely orrotatong. Thereafter, we see Evita putting together the Eva Peron foundation , helping the poor, and embarking on the famous Rainbow Tour. to promote her country, and perhaps herself "' well. Returning from the tour where she was not always kindly received . She appears tired and is, in fact, dying . In one of the more touching moments of the movie, a haggard looking Evita songs a new song called '"You Must Love Me .. which ha> top 40 written all over ot Then. of course she dtts and a nation grieves . (Although. ot mus1 be pointed out that not everyone was a fan, and she had many a critic, a facl clearly shown m the movie ) So. the bog question on eve ryone's lips must he, ·· 11ow wa~ Madonna?" Well , she is no Patti LuPone, who dod the role on Broadway for many years Nor d oe!'> t he h a v e 1n h e' '" (.:~ .h1 brings a fresh interpretation to the pro· ducuon that I dodn "t really expect Some of the paralle ls between her lolc and Evtta's are obv 1ou~. hut m th 1 ~ ca~c. Ille 1m1tat1ng an l!-i no t t..uch a bad thing The rest of the cast is also superb with fine performances from Mr Banderas. and Broadway star Jonathan Price. The score by Tom Roce and Andrew Lloyd Web· ber 1s deltghtful . The only problem aud iences may have wath this film 1s 1hat 11 ,. b»ocally a rock-opera (no •poken words. as everything "done in song) These have not tradtt10nally been pop ular in recent years. Tome woll tell the tale of whether or not the film and genre will prevail. While Madonna songs "'You Must Love Me .. on the back ground, I think to myself. not always. but this tome, yes and meet John· l'ar~er and his staff. T h is fi lm rates • ••. 7~. edlito4 Holliday continued ... 1"tlazy J 312 Tuam • Houston (713) 528-9343 * tJflp.AY SUPER SH * 11ear'$ S.A 1 10:10 Piii OW • f ·•' y. •• t 1vew 51tow SATURdAy, 0 ECEMbER 28 MC: PEAC~ES GUESTS: FRANkiE LANE SpECiAL GUEST suP;~,,111 Frankie Lane Peaches Nilclci Collins Cf1'•mp,u1ne l'•rtfl f•rlors IConlmwtl from pagr I) and connect with a spiritual base," laments Holliday Holliday has an mtcrestmg theory as to why she has connected so well w oth the gay and lesbian community "What made me connect with gays and lesbians was my character m Dreamgtrl<." she opined. "Effie sings from experience and a great deal of pain. She is basically smgmg a <0ng of rejection and gay. and lesbians fight for acceptance. They can relate to that." Holliday says many of her fans connected to her because of the songs she sang and being overweight. "Many people were upset with me because I lost weight," says Holliday who believes her weight was a positive to some people because they FRIDAY NIGHT S11ck A. ROUl'<d & DANCE \'\h. could relate to someone who, like them, II-BALL wnk OUR DJ T,. did not fit into a societal stereotype. LEAGUE ME:MlxRs O...ty Bill CoNzAlEZ I Holliday has assembled a 16-track collcc- L.-..;;:;....~~~~~~:...-~~~~~~~~~~_,;,,,--' 12 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 tion on her latest CO, .. The Best of' Jen­nifer Holliday"', on Geffen records. "When Geffen Records told me the) wanted to release a compilation of m) work. I was very happy " recalled Holli­day. "Then. "'hen the company asked me to be involved in choosing the material for the album, I was truly honored I'm so glad we were able to present both the chart records and some of my personal favorites ... Holliday will perfonn many of those hits and personal favorites during her New Year's Eve perfonnance al the Alley The­ater. The show begins at 9 p.m. and is followed by a buffet reception after the perfonnance. If you have never seen Jennifer Holliday perfonn, you should. She is a testament to powerful superlative skills and soulful artistry. For ticket infonnation, contact the Alley Theater at 228-842 I. SPORTS CAPSULE By LEE DAVIS Volley's Volunteers It you would like 10 meel a1hle1es from aero!'~ the U.S .. you are needed to assist w11h 1he Lone Star Volleyball Classic IX io be held Easier Weekend, Friday, Mar<h 28 and Sa1urday, March 29. 1997 Volunteers are needed to distribute welcome packe1s, regis1er players. hou-. players. ass1s1 al lhe gyms, show 1hc city, etc. It you are 1111eres1ed, please leave a mes­sage on 1he Lone Siar Volleyball Asso­ciauon's 24 hr. voice mail a1 713-878- 4629 League reports D1vis1on I Standmgs m Isl, 2nd and 3rd places are Beal 1he Meal Again, We Go There and The Eclec1ic Tw11s. In Div1s1on II, Spank My Feet, Thirs1y Wives Club and ln1elligen1 W1feforms occupy 1he 1op spo1s. High Scralch Game of257 and Series of 701 was bowled by Bob Roberts. High Handi­capped Game was bowled by Chris1opher SchullZ and Series by Rick Key. Bowling rs al Palace Lanes al 9pm on Monday. Call Tom al 522-9612 The Inner Loop Sunday Evening League reporls s1andings of Pleasepon't Ea1 1he Daisy in Isl, We Go There Too in 2nd and Have Mercy in 3rd. High Scralch Game of 245 and Senes of 650 was bowled by Brian Galveston & Matzatlan Elley for 1he men . High Handicapped Game and Series was bowled by Gary Bue­The Rainbow Fishing Club 's firsl fish ckner. For lhe women Pen Cain bowled 1ng ouung on 1he Tex sun II on Sunday, ' High Scra1ch Game of 244 and Series of Dec 8 ,.,, a greal success w11h seven club 609. Gayle Newcomb bowled High Hand­members ca1ching 35 Red Snappers plus 11capp~d Game and Wm Boyd Senes For a tew Triggert"h. Bluefish and Black more info call Tom al 522-9612. Bowling Orum . •~at Palace Lanes at 7pm on Sunday. The nexi club 1np will be Sunday, Jan . 19 The Wednesday Night Mixers reports on lhe Tcxsun ll. The 12·hour mp on the 70- Gu11er Bumper in Isl w11h Pariy Line in 2nd tool deluxe cruiser cos1s $60 per person and Charley's Tunas in 3rd . For 1he men and 1he boal 1ravels 40 10 80 miles in10 1he High Scra1ch Game of 209 was bowled by Gulf of Mexico. All fishing 1ackle is pro Rich Mayer and Senes of 541 by Richard v1dcd Dauchy for lhe men Handicapped Game Jn April. there will be two tnps on the New Buccaneer which can iake up 10 100 peo· pie Dales are Wednesday April 16 and Sunday April 20. If m1eres1ed in any of 1heir ac11vi11es call 713 523 ·6381. Rack 'em Up was bowled by Corey Fourne1 and Series by Doug Winslow. For lhe women Terry Shannon bowled High Scralch Game of 253. Senes of 596 and also High Handi­capped Game and Series. Call Tom al 522- 9612. Bowling is al AMF Sou1hway al 6 30pm on Wednesday. . . . . The Monday Night Women's League !he Hou.ion Metropolitan Billiards I bowls al 6:15pm at AMF Sou1hway on !."ague, Inc. (l!MBL) repons Week 8 sta~ · I Mondays. Balls R Ou1 IS m 1 SI wi1h Bii· drng< .•~ Oui Cousrns, Jadson 5, J.R s ches in Beau11ful Shir1s m 2nd, TAZ Club Cuc Crew, Ripcord Maniacs and Mas - '"3rd and Four of a Kind'" 41h For more 1cr' ol lhe Mme m !SI lhrough 51h places info call Pal 11 437-6218. 1 Jingle Ball> No Tap 1h1> Saiurday at 8pm I at Palace Lanes Bring a partner or come alone rl1e 1h11J mon1hly meeung will be held on Jan 12 at 1hc Mining Company at 2pm . One halt \Cason dues are due al thal tune ($24.50 per person or $122.50 per leam) Jan 14 "sla1ed as 1he lasi da1e for player Bicycle Party ~talus changes . fhe 1op five players are Larry Len1z (Boo­,, c 1 s). Troy Ristow (Maste rs of the Mme). Ken Bailey (Ou1 Cousins). Bob Cyperl (Jackson 5), and Willie Suniga (Jackson 5) Gutter Balls f'he '\1on1ro~e Monday Night Men's The Houston Chain Gang Cycling Club hosis 1heir annual Holiday Party on Fri­day, Dec. 20 al 7pm al lh c:: C lub Pres1- den1's reSJdence. For info call 863- 1860. On Sa1urday Dec . 28 al !Oam, 1he "Mon1rosc Ramble" begins a1 lhe Pacific S1ree1 side of Heaven. This is a 15- mile nde through 1he Monirose area. Call John al 863· 1860 10 RSVP. FREE COMPUTER TRAINING 658-8883 ... EXT. ,.£;. CALL NOW "t'' TO APPLY State of the Art Career Training • DOS/Windows • Word Processing - MS Word • Spreadsheet - Lotus 123 • Database Management - Access You Can Become a ... • Data Entry Clerk • Business Communications • Word Processor • Typing • Customer Service Rep. • Secretary • Receptionist • Accounting Clerk WE PROVIDE ... • Job Placement Assistance • All Books & Materials • Child Care • Bus Tokens • Convenient Location • Technical Support DSU TRAINING INSTITUTE, INC 800 Webster, Suite 700, Central Square Building Houston, Texas 77002 An Equal Oppor1un11y Employer. Career and Placemen! Conlractor FUNDED BY HOUSTON WORKS I HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27. 1996 13 Leasing and Management 713/523-1600 December 31, 1996 Bring in 1997 with an extravagant evening of incredible music by J.D. Arnold and live entertainment throughout the club. $15 cover includes: Strolling Entertainers, New Years Party Favors, Midnight Toast, and a Complimentary Cajun Buffet. So come and party like they do in Rio de Janeiro. 2401 San Jacinto Houston 77002 HOUSTON 713.759.9606 www.aol.members/richs01.com . ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT The Best and Worst in Television The Best IX·F1les and ER) B) JQ'I, A'loTHO'loY The Best I Frasier (NBC)-Despue all lhe shenan· 1gans of series star Kelsey Gr.immar. th s ts still televu1ons best written and acted show Kudos go to David Hyde Pierce as ~iles Crane Hts portrilyal or the ""1mp1sh char acter borders on hysteria The srdlar cast 1s superb and the sho-A· u genumel) funny SeHon h1ghligh1s include 1he epi­sode where Miles pretends to be Daphne's husband at her urging to a1Jo1d having to comply wuh an old promise to • former boy friend that they would marry 1f neither of them found true love w1thm .5 years The epi sode 1s a testament to the talents of this extraordinary cast Another standout ep1· sode. Fras ier and L1l1th attempting to get 1hetr son ma prestigious role Bebe Neu· w1rth reprised her Chters character with great ap omb .2 The X-Filcs (Fox} 1111s show deserves ns belated sJccess It"s rare when 1cle\-1s1on formulates a series as compelhng as this one The chem1s1ry bctv.cc, 1hc two stars 1s not conn ved and the plot never bores What more could you ask for FuuUy, a show that 1s unpredictable and a viewing dehgh1 l Homicide l~BC) -This JC1t1y drama IS r ve1mg week af1cr week l ,'o lunately n's ratings arc nearly non cx1stc"lt It's '1ard to behcve more people would watch the ms1p1d Don Johnson vehicle Nash Bridges NBC should move thlS ~asry morsc. IO another n1gh1 In fact they should schedule 11 m ER s 11mcslo1 and move 11 10 Hom1c1de's Friday nigh slot [R's loyal fans wou1d follc-. their show o any night of the -.eek If you haven I seen this Ch .. elle'lt shuw do your self a fa\Or ilnt chec-. it ou1 4 Seinfeld (NBC)-Okay, 1he plois are no1 alway"i as good as they U'ied to be; however, for a series thar ha" been on for 8 years, they arc domg pretty great The wruing is s1ill above average and the cast seems 10 be enJOY mg themsehes as much a~ the audience e,JOYS checking 1n with them week after week 5 Cable .\1o>ies (llBO and Show11me)­Leavc ·1 to premium cable 10 produce 1he most provocall\'e and 1 lustrat1ve mov tes that air on the small !itreen 1oday The net worhcould learn a thmg or rwo from HBO and Sheiwumc The ne1works are of the mindset that v1ewe"'s arc ignorant and need 11t1lla uon to be enterta :ied ':"bey inundate us w1~'1 the usaal damse m d 1stress ( rans la lion movies dcmeanmg of womc~). dis­ease o' the week. (tnns1ation· tcarJerker) and star vehicle films that arc no braincrs If I sec one more movie featuring a cast mcm· ber from Beverly Hills. 90210 or Melrose Place rm going 10 have a nelly spell Cable mov 1cs, like Showtimc · s recent Angelica Hus1on offering Bastard Out of Carolina and HBO's If These Walls Could Talk uar nng Demi Moore, Siss) Spacek and Cher. arc 1ntcllig1blc and 1ntcresting. Yes. they were both controversial but at least they were done with a le,•el of maturuy that the networks rarely arc capable or d1spla)· mg Hype w11hou1 substance does no1 go far There IS a reason 'Nhy cable dominates the Emmy Awards in the movie category year after year. May he the networks should gel a clue 6 ER (!'<BC~-A fa SI paced me11ng hou of cmo11onal upheavals th engrosses you for the duration of 115 program The real stars he"'c are 1he writers and producers NG many shows can go 1hrough cast changes and SI :1 create a yearning f'o viewer h>)alty It's a great show and ts 1he highcs1 ra1ed show or lhe year 7 The Dre" Care) Sho" (ABC)- Near can cellation st year due o anemu.; ratings, 1h1s sitcom has hel.omc one of the seasons surprise sophomr e h11s and deservedly o Carey id '11s \1det1d: \.11n1 1Ht" a hoor Originally billed as a Friends clone Carey has had the final laugh. There 1s no compan· son In this cr111cs "icw, Friends 1s tired 8 \ tad About You (NBC) Th s series deserves accolades for origm.,,fuy and bclic"ahllity There hun ·1 been a couple on tcle"is1on, or rn movies for that mar· tcr, v.11h such authentic chemistry in many of years In fac1. Jamie and Paul arc the Hep bum and Tracy of !he small <creen Their daily nuances ue clc"er and funny. This is a show about two people in love -you'll euher lo\'e it or hate Aside from it's romanuc1sm. this show deals wilh homosexuality belier than any show l'\'c seen The lesbian couple plot is rn1erwoven with normalcy and integ· ruy and the portrayalc; arc sincere and gen· u1ne Mad Abou1 You Is a gem 9 ~c~ sRadio (NBC)- Thi~ show deserves a new t :nc slot What an ensemble cast They're brilliant Even when the writing 1s not up to par. this talented group deliver a riotous performance week after week It hu been a ratings underachiever since it debuted three years ago NBC needs co find a slot where viewers can sample this sitcom Why can't the network get rid of the ridicu· IOU\ Thuri-day night sncom The Smglc Guy and provide us a night of some real .. must see TV?" 10 Biogr a phy (A&E)-This mforma11ve and cn1ertainmg show offer< the \·iewer a profile of some or his1ory's greatest ind1 \liduals mcluding some modern day icons The show 1111.J\'CS at a fast pace and delves into aspects ot tht indi,·idual not normally cov ered m routine interviews No mat1er the !tub;ect. Biography delive~s The Wors t I Roseanne (ABC)-Once th~ cril1cal darling ot 1elev1s1on 1h1s sh.a"' d1dQ 1 knov. when to quit Whal use 10 he funny and tnnlna11vc has become a caricature of tsclf While most show!> v.ane rn 1a1er years. fev. have lost so much m such a short tune The lollcry plot u ridiculous a'ld ncrcdu lous The -.-.hole 0:11nnal charm of l~us show was 11S humorist lake ~'° a regular family J day lo day '5.ru,:glc If I want to see a ncb tam ily become a bunch ot bores, r11 watch an Aaron Spelling soap 2 J o hn Larroqueue (NBC)-·11 's no1 funny by any stretch of the 1magrna1ion In fact It's depressing Why 1he network renewed th1~ show is beyond me It's not a ratings, nor critical. succeH Larroquette was not 1he reason we all watched NightCour1, so why docs he have his own show? ti's got to be one of life's unsolved mysteries J Coach (ABC)-Thi; show would have been long gone if ii had no1 had 1he luxury or cu sh time slots (following Home Improve ment Grace Undcrf1rc, and 1hc aforemcn tioned Roseanne rn its heyday). h's been on for 9 years. so 1hcre arc plenty of episode!! for the lucrati"c syndicated matk.et I only wish ABC would spare us the agony of endur rng another \Cason of this absurd sucom Cancel it already 4. Cybill (CBS)-Thi< pains me . LaSI year, I lhoroughly en;oyed watching this show The rela1ionsh1p between Cybill and Mar 1annc was hilarious Never have I seen a show lose ifs luster so soon. CBS needs to gc1 hac:l to the fonnula that works and focus 1he sucom on Cybill and her countcrpar1 or risl losing what could be a "aluable tranch1se before 11 s too la1e 5 Murphy Brown (CBS)· -Again, a former fa\·ori1e gone awry The addition ol Lily Tomlin to the cast wa ... a major coup for the show and CBS Instead of utilizing her immeasurable talents, 1hey have rcle gated her to such a \Upportmg role, tt I\ an embarrassment. The plots arc ludicrous 1he writing has become stale and the entire shov. has gone amuck Classic's. and Mur phy Brown is a classic. should be allowed 10 retire gracefully-not humil1a1ed into e:ttinc11on J"he WorSI (Rosra1111f"} NEW YEAR'S EVE 't& e ttt' ~o9 &~\Oe at the Brazos Champagne & Party favors free Breakfast at 2:00 am Join Your friends and Ring in the Mew Year ... Country Stylel s 7. 0 o~~/~ee~~~r 2400 Brazos • Houston (713) 528 9192 14 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27. 1996 II you would Joke an event listed m th is sec­tion. please feel free to call 529-8490 or fax at 529 9531 Call First! Some groups do not meet during the holi­days Please call first Friday, Dec. 27 ' Borders Book Store Gay/Lesbian Book Club meets at the Espresso Bar at 9634 Wes­t he 1 mc r. 782-6066. • lllV + Art classes at the Art League. 523- 88I7 • HATCH meets 942-7002 . • 12-stcp program at Montrose Coun­seling Center. 6 :00 pm 529-0037. • Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 pm. 529- 0037 • Houston Tennis Club meets at 7: 15 pm. 537 - 1348. • Q·Patrol meets to walk: the s1reets at I 0 30 pm 528-SAFE • AIDS Mastery workshop starts. 861- 6453 • Free Spaymg and Neutering Program. 522 -2337 • Gay and Lesbian Unuarian Un iver­sallst Pot Luck dinner 526-5200. Saturday, Dec. 28 Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club rides . 863-1860 . • After Hours on KPl'T 12:00 am to 3:00 am. 90. 1 FM . 526·5738 • Gulf Coa.t Transgender support group meets . 780-4282 . • Q·Patrol meets to walk the streets al 10:30 pm 528·SAl·E • V1~ual Art Alliance meets at 10:00 am. 583-8408 • Autumn \ Seasons Bondage Club dis· CU1•\1on group anJ open house at I 0:30 am. 788 5593 Sunday, Dec. 29 llous 1on Cha111 Gang Bicycle Club meets. 863 - 1860. • Ole Women's Group meets at 10:45 am. 529 -857 1. • f·rontRunner~ meet at 9 :00 am at the fe nn1~ c enter in Memorial Park 5 22· 8021 . • llATCll me ets 942 7002 . • Inner Loop Sun<l3) Bowling League. 522· 9612 . Monday, Dec. 30 • l·ree HIV Testmg and counseling by the Monrrose Clinic at the Brazos River Bollom. 4 :00 pm to 8 :00 pm . • Gay father>/Fathers First support grnup. 8:00 pm 861 · 6181 ' Calendar/Computer workshop for Pride Week. 7 :00 pm. 529- 1223 . • Pos111vc l.1v111g Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 2;15 pm. 539- 0037. • Outpatient Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counselmg Center. 6:00 pm. 529- 0037. • Women and lllV/AIDS Group at Mon· trose Counseling Center. 6 15 pm. 529- 0037 • Men Survivor' of Sexual Abuse Group at Montrose Coun<eling Center. 6: 15 pm 529-0037. • Lesbian Survivors of Cancer and tht-1r care g1\'ers at Montrose Counsel ing Center 6 :30 pm. 529 ·0037. • Men's Ill\' Group at Montrose Coun· ,eJ1ng Center 7 00 pm. 529-0037 • AVf:.S 'ponsored free HIV testing from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm at 4125 SW freeway, Suite 1717 • The Spay /Neuter Ass1~tan c e Pro ~ gram otfen Jo"' cost services 522-2337 · • lleanSong meets 541 -3495 • S2 oft ha1r<ut' an<l free beer (5:00 pm to 8 00 pm) at hiur Star Produrnons . 524 7785 . • Gay and Lesbian Readers Group meets at Harne s & Noble 349-0050 COMMUNITY CALENDAR Tuesday, Dec. 31 Helping Cro« Dressers Ano nymous meets at 239 Wcsthe1mcr. 8 :00 pm. 495- 8009. ' Ba<ic Computer Skills Class at the Kolbe Project. 522 8182 • Gay Men HIV+ Psychotherapy at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 4 30 pm 529- 0037 • Outpatient Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 pm. 529- 0037. • Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center 6 :00 pm. 529- 0037. • AIDS Alliance of the Bay Arca meets at 7 :00 pm 488-4492 . • Empowerment for Living meets for pot luck 861 -9149. • PROTECT· an HIV negative support group meets at 7 :00 pm. 520-7870. • Free HIV tcsung by the Montrose Clmic at Club Body Houston. 8:00 pm . 520-2083 . • Women Survivors of Childhood Abuse at Montrose Counseling Center. 6 :30 pm 529 0037. • Survivors of Loss support group meets at 8:30 pm 778 -2677. • FrontRunners meet at 6:30 pm 522- 8021 • Live Jazz at Borders Book Shop. 782- 6066 • New Year's Fvc Party at the Wyndam­Warw1ck Benefits the Bering Care Cen­ter 529·6071 • Hous1on Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abu<e'< popular New Year's Eve celcbra11on at 9 00 pm. 942 4116 Wednesday, Jan. J • Free HIV tc<img and counsclmg by the Montrose Chn1c at Mary 's. 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm . ' llou swn Tennis C'luh meei. at 10:30 pm 537-1348 . • Houston Pnde" Band practices at Dig nuy Hous to n . 524-0218 •GLOBAL meets at 4:00 pm. 743-7539 • Women's Action Coalition meets at Toopces at 7 .00 pm. 867-9581. • Men ·s Network at Montrose Counsel­ing Center. 7 :00 pm. 529-0037 •Houston Tennis Club meets at 7; 15 pm. 537- 1348. • Lambda Rollers kating Club skate at 8 :00 pm. 933-5818 •Women's Network at Montrose Coun­seling Center. 7 :00 pm. 529-0037. • Ongoing Mixed L1v1ne in Process Group for men and women . 622-7250 for more info. • Living wuh Chronic Pam at Montrose Counseling Center 9 30 pm 529-0037. • Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 pm 529- 0037. •Women's Issues Process Group at Mon­trose Counseling Center 6:30 pm. 529- 0037. • HIV Survivor Support Group meets at 7 ·00 pm. 782-4050 •Women's Clm1c at the Montrose Clinic. 5 ·00 pm to 8 :00 pm Call 520-2000. • A YES offers free HIV test mg from I 0:00 am to 5:00 pm. at 4125 SW Freeway, Suuc 1717. • Lesbian/Bisexual Survivors at Mon­trose Counseling Center 6:30 pm 529- 0037. • Cancer Dialogue Support Group meets at noon at Park Plaza Hospital 1-800- 611-CARE. • Housron Philosoph) Forum meets at Cafe Express 779 8620. • Houston Gay and Lesbian Poli11cat Caucus meet< at 7 30 pm 521 - 1000 Thursday, Jan. 2 • Free HIV te\lmg and coun\Ohng by the Mo ntrose Cllnu: at the Venture ·N from 4 00 pm to 8 :00 pm . • Art Labs at The Art League at t ·OO pm. 225-9411 • Front Runners meet at ~e monal Park at 6 30 pm 522 8021. • Gay Men ·s Chorus of Houston open rehearsal at 7 00 pm 521 -7464 . • Twentysomethmg meets at 7 30 pm. 315-6786 . • KPFT Lesbian and Gay Voices airs from 8 :00 pm to 10 00 pm 866-6505 . • Ongoing gay men's L1vmg in Process Group . 622-7250. •Open Mike Night at Cafe Artiste. 1601 W Mam. 8 :00 pm. 528-3704 • HIV+ Men Psychotherapy at Mon· trosc Counseling Center. 1:15 pm. 529- 0037 • Relapse Prevention at Montrose Counseling Center 2 00 pm 529-0037. • Outpatient Group Treatment 11 Mon­trose Counseling Center 6:00 pm. 529- 0037. • Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counschng Center. 6:00 pm 529· 0037. • Mcd11a11on and Chantmg Group meets at 7 00 pm 942 0923 •HIV Affected at CASA. 7:00 pm. 796- 2272 . • Men"s Therapy Group at Montrose Counseling Center 7 00 pm 529-0037. • HIV Survivor Support Group meets at 2929 Unity Drive. 7 :00 pm. 782-4050 •Center for the Healing of Racism. 7:30 pm 738-RACE • Gay Men· s Chorus of Houston meets at 7 00 pm. 521 -SING 'The Center lor AIDS forum meets 527· 8219 • The Spay l ~eu1er A~s1stance Proeram offers low cost ser>1cts 522 -2337 • The Cen1er for Students wuh D1sab1I · 111es HIV+ support group meets. 743 - 5400 1022 WESTHEIMER 713/527-9669 · .. -.. (l CLIFF & GAYE r~/ ~ ~ . STAFF WISH YOU A ,J'Ew ' , , HAPPY NEW ~ YEAR ... naturally JOIN US FOR OUR NEW YEARS CELEBRATION! CHAMPAGNE TOAST AT MIDNIGHT HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 15 Services Directory STFWART ALLEN ROBIN DESIGNS l>TI:WART A ROBIN R Arch11ectw-c ~ Monu'* 01\.1.i Suite bO~ Houston ll''lH 77006 \711) S21-61KI fax (713) 52J-619l Pa~·~ 2H1-725-6'Jll4 Taft Street Auto Repair & Service 526- 3723 Complete Brake' and ~ Electrical Repair \arhurelor Tun<-Up Fu<I MaJor or Minor Repair lnicc.:uon 1411 Tart Houston, Texas 77019 428 Yw'estheuner - Houston. Te'(~ - 7 J()()f) 713-524-7077 Fax 711-521 ·CARS Crossroads Market & _!!QQ~~!_Q_RE ·"ww.·cros,m~arke·1.com·/wel·comc 1111 Wes1hc1mer • Hous1on. Texas 77006 171 J) 942-0147 • Fax (713) 942-8871 3930 Cedar Springs Road • Dallas. Tern' 75219 (2141521 8919 • l'a' !214J 521-8595 Booh. mu-st{ and more Jor the f..,,h1.1n, g•y Jnd fem1ni'>t < ommunilie\. 1846 Richmond Av~. Hou~lon, Tu. ... , 77()C)8 (71J) 521-1169 (800) 931 ·3169 Your Business Card Could Go Here I Call 529-8490 for details! ThE CoflEE MAN JoAr.NE & LEE Lour.drn ESPRESSO BAR • 18lll EGRET 8Ay Blvd. & ("s1d1 HAif Po1u Books10RE) CIEAR LAkE ')/(,ed, ~ ~ ~ Fo1"dly AlMOSpHERl sA~dw1cHES (281) Oi£ss coffn LATTE Arvd 794- TR1v1A CAppuc1~0 fROZEr. do1~ks MORL 1}60 Your Business Card Could Go Here I Call 529-8490 for details! r Happy H o lidays FROM JA"A JA"A CAFE 'i HEl{flfTS AJO"E FLORI~ OCR TE-;TH Y~.AR SERVICE FIR'iT INTEIUIATIONAL !ASTE Nflt;llSOf.llOOD PlACf 911 W. llTll ST. 88ChlAYA OPEN SEVEN DAVS 16 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27 1996 Services Directory MACKMURDO'S Steve Oxener o.nl 11.aufr Made Fresh Dally 713(785.WS 713.'S74-1335 Fu CHRISTY'S DONUTS 8'scuols, en..s.nts. Kolac:hes. MIA!lns Mon. -Sat 5a.m. -6p.m Sunday 6a.m. -3p.m. TEL (7131 524--4005 1103W Gray at Montroee Housron. Texas 77019 SeanV Heng Counseling/Psychotherapy Individuals • Couple • Family Group Counsehng Jean-Louis Armand, L.M.S.W.-A.C.P. Karena Valkyrie, M.A. Montrose 529-5427 Jeffrey A. Walker, Ph.D. Cl 1 n cal Psychol •g, -,t Psychotrerapy · Testing · Consultation Adults, Children, & Adolescents 4200 Montrose Blvd Suite 540 Houston, Texas 77006 Scolt 0. Garrison hnanfial Consultant By Appointment (713) 522-7014 Fax (713) 802-0662 ~Merrill Lynch Pravatt' Cht>nt <lroup 5065 We~tht>1mn Suite 1010 East Houston. 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Alabama E ~ ~ m Richmond 1_1'! ...,,_ m Elil't .:..nere1GrwentN&HcX:arrOI lB E :l ~ .>< 0 cc ~ UJ en 0 Richmond I"-' z 0 :::!E 59 Featuring Distribution in the HOUSTON/GALVESTON Area The LONE STAR in HOUSTON's Gay/Lesbian News To Report the News • Subscribe • Advertise (713) 529-8490 Nationwide (800) 729-8490 • Fax (713) 529-9531 n HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 19 ¢i m 10 30 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 60 61 62 63 @EARL STORM MADONNA DOING EVITA! § or ¢t ':l I I IS "0 IJ1 &I ~ <;§ Accommodations Montrose 'nn 408 Avondale The Loven Inn 501 Lovell Blvd Bars/Clubs 6'1 Hyde Park 611 Hyde Park 5~206 522-5224 526-7070 BnarPatch 2294 W Holcombe 665-9678 Brazos River Bottom 2400 Brazos St 528-9192 Chances 1100 Westhe1mer 523-7217 Cousins 817 Fairview 528-9204 EUs 2517 Ralph 527-9071 Gentry 2303 Richmond 520-1861 Heaven 812 Pacific 521-9123 o1R's 808 Pacific 521-2519 Lazy J 312 Tuam 528-9343 Marys 1022 Westheuner 527-9669 M M1mngCo 805 Pacific 529-7488 Outpost 1419 RIChmond 520-8446 'Pacific Street 710 Pacific 523-0213 Pastrme 617 Fa1MeW 528-8102 ors 534 Westheuner 529-8813 Rascar• 1318 \Nestheuner 942-2582 R!Chs 2401 San Jacinto 759-9606 Ropcord 715 Fanview 521-2792 Steam 402 Lovell 521-1450 Venture-N 2923Ma1n 522-0000 Restaurants, Bookstores. Other Businesses Baba Yoga Rest 2607 Grant 522-0042 Boudreaux Rest 2313 Crocker 526-0790 Chari.es Cof!ee Shop 1100 Westheomer 522-3332 Chills Smoot~ies 3939 Montrooe 526-5300 Chnsty Oonu1s 1103 W Gray 524-4005 C1neplex-Odeon 1450W Gray 524-8781 Crossroads Bookstore 1111 Westhe1mer 942-0147 Eckerds Drug Store 1007 'Nesthe1mer 524-9229 Houston Voice 811 \Nestheuner 529-8490 Ink ngs Bookstore 1846RICl1mond 521-3369 Kroger Grocery 3300 Montrose 526-1865 Lobo Books & Video 3939-S Montrose 522-5156 Ma 1n SI Theatre 4617 Montrose 52Hi706 Montrose Cknic 215 Westheuner 520-2000 Clothing Stores Basic Brothers 1232 \Nesthemer 522-1626 ~wets Boutique 2404 Taft 523-3557 Leather by Boots 807 FairvMtw 526-2668 Leather Forever 711 Fanvtew 526-6940 BoN YoyAGE Suprn Bowl BARbECUE & DocksidE DivrnsioNs 4:00 pM SuNdAy, JANUARY 26 9:00 PM - BERMUdA lRiANGlE REVUE GENTRY - 2}0} RiCHMONd DivAs of THE DEITA OuEEN: A"I OuTRAGEOUS NiGHT of A THousANd STARS 10:00 PM SATURdAy, fEbRUARY 1 GENTRY - 2}m RicHMoNd THE EvERREAdy Show wiTH PoRTs of CAil AT THE VENTURE-N, BRB, RipcoRd, CHANCES, RAscAls, EJ1s & GENTRY 8:00 PM FRidAy, fEbRUARY 21 TREASURES of ATlANTis SilENT AucrioN OpENs 9:00 PM SATURdAy, MARCH 1 GENTRY - 2}0} RicHMoNd AdMiRAl1s REcEpTiON ANd BuffET 6:00 PM FRidAy, MARCH 1 GENTRY - 2}m RicHMoNd THE H.M.S. OuEEN MARY CoTillioN f EATURiNG LivE ENTERTAiNMENT & RAfflE DRAWiNGS 5:00 pM SuNdAy, MARCH 9 BPB - 2400 BRAZOS All pROCEEds hENdiT BERiNG CARE CENTER ANd BERiNG DENTAL CliNic CoRpORATE SpoNsoRs: BisrRo CvisiNE, HovSE of CoiEMAN, HovsroN YoiCE, MONTROSE SofrhAIL LEA<;vE, ThE MAp, ANd TWT I Gay Gene Continued. • • • tConunutd from pagt 6} Al a conference on molecular genet­ics while researching my book. I saw the fu1ure A young, ruhcr cocky b101cch wizard rold his a ud ience of 25 senior oncologislS how hi< lab had inJeClcd 20 rats with carcinogens . He flashed a slide on a screen There were 10 of lhe rals, cut open. 1hc1r insides infested with ran­c id yellow cancerous lesions . The n . sa id lhe b101ech guy, !hey inJCCled the 10 other rats with viruses they had engi­neered. viruses into whi c h they had loaded an anu-canccr gene He n icked to the next slide, taken six months later-the cancer had vanished. Twenry· five oncologists gasped in unison Now, this work was being done to fight cancer. But the technology is applica­ble 10 any gene. Apply 11 10 GAY - 1. and you have genetic surgery to el1minatc homo~exualuy. Even sooner than 1h1s 3cenario becomes possible. howeve r, the gay gene may provide ammunition to conservatives in the debate over abor­tion We know genetic surgery wil l require progress in a number of differ­ent sc1ent1f1c d1sc1pl&nes before II is 1 pract1cahle That may take a decade or more But all the techno logy for selec­tive abortion already exists . A test like amn1ocentes1s may soon be able to determine whether a fetus will become a gay adull-and given the fact that there is an almos t unlimited right to abortion, parenh will certainly be able to term1· nale 1he fe1us on that basis alone. This cruth turns 1he politics ot abortion upsu.k down. Liberals will be faced for 1he first lime with the fact that the .. right to ch oo~e '" might be used to target one of their own consruuenc1es And the pos"b1l1ty that abortion will be used as a form of sexual eugen ic~ m1gh1 make liberals who have long fough t for the right to abortion in every c ircumstance think twice J·unhermore. genetic research may yet lead to the discovery that the gay gene is a disease gene. The most care fully con- 51dered 1heory on how GAY I mig ht operate pos11stha1 II 1s a d~fectiv~ gene, one that in 5 percent o f the popu · lat1on fails to carry out the b1ochem1 cal function for whic h na1 u ra l selec- 1100 chose 11. Result? Homosexuality. •• Pat Robertson often claims that ··obviously " there could not be a gay gene because nature only selects for genes that ·· 1m:reasc reproduction." Rober tson lnow' ooth1ng about the subject. Any f1rst - ye.11r college gene11cs stu­dent could point out that anti-reprod uc­tive tra1u arc .. selected for'' all the time. !low' Through <omething called "ple - 1otropy, • the tact lhat genes have side eltec". a> do drug< . Nature not only could easily select for a gay gene, but 1t can. and does , regularly select for genes that kill U\. One examp le . lhe gene th a t na ture st:lech 10 pro1ec1 us from malaria. Th is gene ha.; a devas1at 1ng p le1otrop ic Side ctfect·lt's called sickle-cell anc m1a. If u turns out that the .. gay gene" 1s Simply another example of p le io iropy. thlS would •ugge\l that homo · sexuality 1s , like ~1ckle·cell disease. nothing more than 1 01ochem1cal fluke . Why, then. should conserva · C1ves cower tlefore 1he idea of a gay gene' Uunt111g10n°s disea se is caused by a gene. and tha1 makes ll untina; rnn ·s ne1 ~ th e r ··good·· nor ••acceptable •• In addatrnn to the b1omed1ca l payoff, there 1s a more unportant reason to embrace gay-gene research-an 1 deo ~ log ical one lh1s u the second long­term gain tor con erva11ves The fun ­damental battle hetween Right and l.elt smce the modern era began 1s ahout one tf11ng Whose view of human nature IS tor rect > The ere.at ma.Jonty of us never lhrnk about 11 . but every pol.cy. every pro gram , every law regulating evcry­lhmg from guns to homelessness to ta11: · 1tion 1s predicated on how llS formu btors see human nature . rhc liberalnm tha1 emcracd fro m Locke and Rousseau holds that every· one 1s born tabula rasa , as a blank slarc upon which socie ty a nd env ironment wnte the adu lt that emerges. This is hb· eralism's most funda menta l assump­tion. and in late·20t h-ccntu ry America it is the intrinsic and usually unstated JUStificat1on fo r taxpayer-funded soc ia l progra ms. Pass e nough pro · grams. spend enough on them, and we can equa lize the sexes, equa lize the races, level a ll pro fessio na l play ing fi e lds, wi pe o ut c rimanality, make the lazy indus trious, th e stup id smart. the v 10- lent pac ific, and t he poor rich The research on homosexuality says : No. It says: In fundamental ways. we arc born with many important aspects of the way we arc . And nothing-no Head Start program, no midnight basketball, no welfare check. no well intentioned but m1sgu1ded c lemency from the bcnch­can modify lhat or make it better. It is evidence for 1he most important asscr· tion that conser vatism makes about human nature: We are, m some ways. born differen t. Men arc d ifferent from women Sometimes the vio lent need to be locked away. Intelligence 1s, to a cer ­tain degree. a given The brand of liber · ahsm that now dominates public pol · icy 1s futile because 11 ignores human nature Its ph1lo<oph1cal leniency 1s an assault on society anc.I on common sense . Journalist Jame< Fallows , himself a liberal , put ii 10 me 1h1s way· "l.1heral­ism, which ha~ for the past four hundred years ridden to triumph on science, is now al odds wuh science, which 1s show· mg deeper remnants of our animal past lh an liherals are comfor tab le w11h 0 The implicat1ons of biology's f ind· ings have not escaped scienthts . Lau a rence Frank, a zoologist at Berkeley. exclaimed to me wi1h disgu s1. ·•1 can '1 even call myself a libe ral a nym orel .. Frank had given a lecture on animal endocr ino logy and the way hormones d e t e rmine ma le ness a nd fema le ness, "and a young woman came up after wards and she was shocked . shocked that I would say such a th ing ." In her v iew, "male· ness" is J USI macho posturing "socially constructed ·· by society. "femaleness" a myth created by the Neanderthal patriarchy . Bu t l<> b1ol- I og1<ts, gender is as real as oxygen . F rank sighed and said . "The observa· 1100 that behaviors arc biolog ically directed 1s scary tu hberab because that means people aren" t infin1tcly mallc· able. It means you can't pass laws and do ~oc1al engineering to c hange lhe nasty people, and liberals-and Marxists 1n the mo re extreme sense- are complete ly and tot ally committed to the notion that we can cha nge anyt hing . All we need 1s good will ." lie concluded " It seems to me JUst extravagant s tupid ity to pre­tend devoutly that human' are totally cul· 1ural and environmental creatures" In fac t . the 1rad11rnnal conservat ive posit ion on homosexual11y-'" l1fc · style"-tocs exactly th " l iberal h nc . Fallows observed piquantly and with some p leasure that the .. li festyle .. argumenl "ha~ a lways forced ..::onser­vat1sm, a philosophy holding that the environment has lllt le to do with ouc­comcs- and that liberal prog ram, meant to airer II are a waMe or money-to make an inconvenient excep11on on homosexual11y and argue, contra .. d 1crnroly, that young people can be pushed one way or another rnto profound aspects of their personal111es by edu· Callon and society. Which 1s exactly what liberals have wanted lhern to admit•• Dump the int e rnally Illogical trad111onal posilton tor a stance the liberal Fallows des cribes 3\ " truly repellent to the lihcral mind ," and con­. servat1sm becomes \tronger. not weaker (Contlflutd on Pagt 15} 20 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 21 On YourNextVNittoHoffiton •.. What you get at the motel on the highway & what you get at the Montrose Inn Motel Heterosexuals with kids .fighting next door. Montrose Inn: Gay men next door. Only gay men. Nothing but gay men . Motel: Several miles to the gay bars. Montrose Inn : 5 tiny blocks to the gay bars Motel: Drive to the gay bars & pay $5 to park. Or take a $15 cab. Montrose Inn: Walk to the gay bars. Or take a $3 cab. Motel: Drive back from the gay bars and risk the cops making you walk the straight line. Or take a $15 cab. Montrose Inn : Walk back from the gay bars. Or take a $3 cab. Motel: Pay $39 to $95 a night for a room Montrose Inn : Pay $41 to $79 a night for a room. Motel: Eat in their restaurant. Food for the masses. Pay plenty. SI soft drink machine Monirose Inn: Complimentary late night sandwiches & full breakfast the next day Free soft drinks, juices. coffee 24 hours Motel Cruise the parking lot and get threatened . Montrose Inn: Cruise the hallways Pleasel Motel : The recep11001St sneers at you. Montrose Inn: The receptionist winks at you Motel; Wa•hing machine? Ironing board? Haor dryer? Refrigerator? Stove? Microwave? VCR & gay movies? Are you kidding? Montrose Inn : All of the above. Free to use. Motel: Full soze bed, everything else is plastic. Montrose Inn: Queen size bed, hardwood floors, hardly any plastic . Motel: Maid knocking 8 a.m., you moan but she's commg on anyway. Checkout II a .m. Montrose Inn: Handsome man next door knocking 11 a .m . to join horn for breakfast. Checkout 1 p . m . Reservations requested. 1-800-357-1228. The house at 408 A rondale. lbe Montrose Inn os NOT a motel. We're NOT a hotel. We're a Bed & Breakfast. (And we're Basic & Butch. We're the B&B that's B&B.) We're completely different• Pref erred GraRhics The Preferred Source for Compwer Graphic Design High Quality, Custom Designed Graphics. Do you need reliable Stn'ire for your graphic 1"""1s? Providingsupenor graphic design to our community" our >pccialtyt Ami it comes tt'itlt a Customer Satisfaction Guarantw! \\e offer design & layout, desktop publishing. typing. and printing to meet all of your graphic requirements. From callingcards&stationaryto ad copy & design. go \\iththepre/ermtsource . Preft.'n'l'dGrapltics. Internet Web Page 0esign Computer Staffing Charter Member H HOt:STO:-> Goy&~ OIA.\IBER o( Cornmera: 713.528.7654 pgraphic@neosoft.com 4200 Montrose Blvd, Suite 540 COLUMNIST Past Out B} DAVID BIANCO Who Was Terry Dolan? Ten y ears ago 1h1s week, Terry Dolan, a key conservatove ac11v1s1 of the 1980s. doed of AIDS. Even as a child, Dolan was active on Republican politics, volun­teering for Richard Nixon's 1960 pres· 1dent1al campaign . When he was 25, he helped organize the National Conser­vative Political Action Committee (NCPAC), and he soon became that organ· izat1on's director Dolan was an extremely talenrcd fund rai!'iicr. and many credit him and his or1anization with lhe stunning triumph of the New Right on 1980. Dolan worked hard for the nomi­nation and electoon of Ronald Reagan as Pres ident, althou&h his influence was equally significant in the defeat of lib­eral Senators such as George Mc­Govern. Frank Church and Birch Bayh . The conserva11ves who replaced them (oncludong Dan Quayle) gave 1he Repub· locans a maiority on the Senate for the first time in a generation . Dolan was also gay. He was a regular on 1he gay cocktail -party corcuot of Wash· ongton, DC, and o ften vacationed at gay resorts such as No rthern Calofornoa ' s Russian River, Bui Dolan ' s rela11on­s h1p 10 the gay-rights movement was co mplex . Phil o, ophocally , Dolan .. as opposed to gay- rights laws, onsost· mg chat the go vernment shouldn '1 inter ~ fere 10 people 's hiring practices He balanced that view with a strong defense of privacy-which makes sense. llc:cause a d ecade he tore '"ou11ng;• he relied on th e gay communll) 's d1scret1o n 10 l eep horn from hemg d isc redited amo ng hi s con se r va11ve pee rs In 1982, he ~ra noed an 1n1ervoe .. 10 The Advocate in which he repeated his "UP porl f o r rnva c.y and cr11u.;.1zed 'some of ohe rhetoric 1ha1 some o l 1111 friends on the nght have used on ga ~ activism Rut [)(. ai (who laoer de nied those comments) was not ahov-: us1,1 a'llr ga) rhe1oru;: ~ :nsell . NC PAC senl our a fund ramng ' : uer thal declared ''the na11on 's moral fiber os herng weakened by the growrng homo sexual movement and the fanat1· cal ERA pushers (many of whom publicly brag that they are lesbians)." Some say Dolan approved 1he leuer, although he apologozed for II to the New York Tomes, calltng tt " totally inappropriatt " In the early 1980s, Dolan iomed wuh for­mer Republican Congressman Robert Bauman, famed discharged gay V1e1nam veteran Leonard Matlovoch and sev eral 01her gay conservatives 10 found the Concerned American> for lnd1v1d ual Rights (CAIR). Unlike the gay Repub- 1 locan group the Log Cabon Club, CAIR found little succe~s . Few members were willing to oake leadership roles of 11 meant publ1c11y, and whole many gay conservatives offered words of encouragement and even cash dona· tions. few would write check~ or even allow their names to be associated with the group. At one poml, lhe group pro· posed to send out a fund-raosong leuer to find conservatoves who would support gay rights, and several of the organoz· ers are saod 10 have requested the names and addresses of any anto-gay responses so they could target those 1nd1viduals wnh homophobic fund·raisong appeals By the tome of Dolan's death, CAIR had largely faded away. When Dolan began to gel sick w11h AIDS, he insisted publicly that he suffered from anemia and d1abe1es. When he died, his family held a memorial service that excluded Dolan ' s gay friends . Instead , conservative mourners such as Pat Buchanan and Utah Senator Orrin Hatch came to pay their respects to a key architect of the conservative revo· lution in American government. A separate service was held by Bauman and others who wanted to remember Dolan for all that he was. The Washing. ion Post accuraoely reported the cause of death, and later ran a long article abou1 Dolan's homosexual11y The conser· vative act1v1st's family and straight friends were furious. Iii< hro1her Tony Dolan (a noted Reagan speechwroter) even look our a 1wo-page ad on 1he Wash­ington Times '""sting that Terry Dolan was not gay . What can we make of a per~on whose per sonal and pol111cal lives seem $0 c.:on tradictory ! Many would seulc fo r a simple answer- Dolan was a sclf.ha11ng homosexual who never hecamc com fo rtable with his sexual orientat ion and expressed h1S discomfort hy 1rymg 10 hurt all gay' and le>h1ans Bui the 1ru1h 1s prohabl~ more complica1cd 1han 1hu fhcre 1s no 111hl·rc:111 gay pos1 11011 " i>n 1 s~ u es such as 1111l1tary ispcnd 1ng o r taxes-and an tnd1\11dual , regard· le ss of his or her sexual or1cntat1on , who te-cl s that conservatives are ri gh1 o n ~uch issues may fmd themselves ha"·­mg ou lace 1he same challenges Uolan dod . Bui then they fond themselves on bed (poloucally, ao lea s t) w11h a Ronald Reaganor a Je"e Helms. and the con n1ct~ between advancing causes the)' believe m and maintaining d1gn11y as a gay person become almost insoluble Given the slow respon<e to the ep1dem1c from lhe admmostrallon he helped pul on place, Terry Dolan·s death from AIDS made for a final irony on a hfe full of para dox David Bianco, M.A., teaches gay and lesbian his tory at the Institute or Gay and Lesbian Education in West Holly· wood. The author or Modern Jewish History for Everyone, he can· be reached care of this publication or through his E-mail address: ArIBianco­@ aol.com . Get off it Exercise. American Hean ft -A''-°"-i-a-tion.v 22 HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 Stein continued ... (Contm11edfrom JXlll.t? //) the spectrum," said Stein. Stein believes the an form has survived 400 years because it has been passed down through generations over the past few cen­turies. However. he stresses that we are at a Junction where the current generation is not as inclined to pass this historical an form down to the next generation. He believes it's up to the industry to educate and introduce the younger generation to this an form. "rhis is a socie!) that has grown to be­come ever. ever, ever more visual. We listen to music now as background. We put music in elevators because we're afraid to stand quietly for a minute. When was the last time someone said to you. I heard a concen. People don't hear a concen. they 'ee them. So. we're fighting an onslaught of a societal change. and for the classical music industl), it's been a real challenge," observed Stem. Ile contends that all funding for non-profit an institutions is critically 1mponant to maintain the heritage. "The more the sense there 1s in a community • I use that as a I love Hillary Clinton's It Takes A Village metaphor - that this is an essential pan of the human experience. the more people are willing to value and validate it \\ith their panicipation And that includes their con­tributions." Stein opined that everyone must be in­volved in protecting our cultural heritage or our count!') will be the only country that does not suppon the an>. "When the government values it. .ind the corporations nre valuing 11 and the foundations are valu· mg 1t and parents arc ,,1lumg n by gomg and sharing 11 "nh their kids. then the whole community is invesung in this great vast sector of human existence." What does a maestro listen to on a per­sonal level? "Obviously classical music of all sons," he exclaims. Yes. but what else is in his CD collection? "A large collection of Barbra Streisand There's a large selec­tion of Bette Midler" He pauses. "Ray Charles. James Brown Cole Poner (Red. Hot and Blue), West Side Story (Various Count!') and Rock Anists) and James Tay­lor," informs Stein. "Oh. I have both Ru­Paul albums. Ru Paul is great for the gym." he adds as an aftenhought. Stein reluctantly admitted that there "'as one other he did not mention and decided to go public with it when pressed. "\\'hen I was a kid. we went to see a concen with Bun Bacharach in the late 60's," recalls Stein. "The opening act was this group that he was JUSt bringing out for the first time and he wanted us to have the pleasure of hearing them and it was Karen and Richard Carpenter And. I remember say­ing to my mother· 'they're really great. I think they're going be big stars,'" he re­counts. Sure enough, several years later they were really big stars he remembers. "What a beautiful voice she had m a beau­tifully musical way." Stephen Stem's career embraces the oper­atic as \\ell as the orchestral idiom. and he also has a strong background m stage di­recting. The Academy Award w mnmg maestro was named the ftrst recipient of !he Cynthia Woods Mitchell Ans in Ex­cellence Award in 1994 in recogn1t1on for hi> dedication to promotmg the cultural gro"th of )oung people In 1'1%, the Ahef Independent School Di-incl pre,entcd him "uh their annual "You Make a D1fler­ence" Award. And. he does Another way to reach us! You can now send your letters, news leads, and other correspondence to the HOUSTON VOICE by e-mail. Address to: HouVoice@aol.com. i. i32~. ~~,~~l';~ ,., (713) 529-1414 , ... ,,., ...... BILL CLAIRE FAMILY MORTUARY a Private Cremation S57.S Complete till' ""' Co.c:era f<N l/lc F•aulY • CCJn'4)1ete Fooeral • Pre-Arranged Services In-Home Services • Pre-Need nSll'ance • Alignment • Brakes • • Al lnsu'ance Policoes Honored 522-9030 H~:t~~~~ ,'' . ' ,., .. PLfltlT flbOSt<I~ JI Specials 2 Oz. Long Stem Roses Poinsettias $19.99 S2.99 Floral arrangements for all occasions FTD World Wide Service and local delivery Fresh Cut Flowers Terra Cotta Pottery ,- Bedding Plants Topiary Animals I Tropical Plants Hanging Baskets Vases, Cards, Gift Ideas & more ,- 112 Westheimer (near Montrose Boulevard) , (713) 529-6050 ..... ,Ill"' - ,Ill"' , a..:.......:..:..:~.:...:.._;_~..:,_~,;_~...:.._:;~~..:....;:.;Ji __ _, ...... HOUSTON VOICE I DECEMBER 27, 1996 23 =KING BACK IN 1996 Gay Gene Continues ... (Continued from pagt 20) The conservative case for the gay gene will ~trike many as too pragmatic, some­v.. hat equivalent to the case for pro· choice Republ1can1sm I admit the pa1alld I am a Colin Powell Republi­can and a gay person who is an ardent ass· 1milat1on1st. I am an ass1milat- 1onist in part because I look at a homo­sexua 1 orientation as a b1olog1cal roll ot the dice that has all the political importance of left-handedness, i.e .. none at all. For this reason. like the law-yer who wrote me. I too would not be oppo~ed to con)1dering genetic sur­ger> Some conservatives may find accept­ing 1he &aY gene 3) repugnant as accept .. mg c.:hoit:e on abortion. But there is one glaring difference between them The key quesuon about abortion is ... When does human life begin'!"-and answer­ing II means def111ing the term .. human Ille f·or most pro-lifers. humanity ha\ "iOme-thmg to do wnh the soul, and the e.\l\lence of the soul 1s not determina· hie by science. But the question about homosexual· 1ty and volition-whether one chooses to he gay 1s subject to empirical verT tlu:a1ion. And among researchers, this ttue,11011 1s considered answered. Wh11.:h means th.ill supporting Position I or 2 -litestylc or disea~e-w11l soon be as pol1t1cally successful tor the Rcpuhhcan party as supporting crea I n1sm And lor those "ho find intolerable e\len the short ttrm gain that liberal· 1~m \l.OU•d get from a conscrva11vc f.:Onvers1011 to the ii.lea of a biological homose.\ual or1cntat1on. I '°'"ould remmd them that there 1s a way out~thc l111al element of the 'nnseniative case for 1111: gay gene l·rom the perspective ul those who seek total proscrip11on of homosc\ual1ty. 11 1:-. cer1a1nly 11npci-lcc1 hut ll I\ at the same 11111e a way 101 co11-,ervat1;,.·cs to stop shrinking from s,cu:ncc and accept the gay gene while nulltf)lllS tts pro-gay pol111- c;.1l 1111pact. h 1s tlie most obvious piece rn the llthate religion. Jellre} Mar.h, a physicist and ortho do\ Jev., reviewed my book for THE Wf.t.'Kl>' SfA.VDARD (August 5, 1996) and rna<lc t'°'"o 'onclus1ve statements. The tirst was 'dent1f1c The research ha> demonstrated the h1olog1cal nature of homosexualny. The sec· ond '°'"as religious and moral This doc ... n"t matter. "The Bable." wrote Mar\h, 0 <loes not forbid homosexual act1v11y emphasis mine because It 1s 'unnatural, but because it 1s on a long list of proh1b 1ted sexual relation· ship;," Many B1bilcally proscribed trails. Marsh noted, have quite natural h10Jog1cal components. from greed to adultery, thelt to murder. But to rt:l1g1on, biology is immaterial. It 1s unnecessary for religion 10 pro· nounce on molcsular genc11cs not mc1el)' hecausc (a\ in the case of Pat Roheruon) It usually gets molecular gent: lies v. rong but because gene11cs are 1rit:levant IO religion For relig· ion speaks wuh ab!r'olutc authority on the nwralll} nt the myriad trans that genes anti moleculc!t create. includ· 1ng human \CXual orien1at1on. :"'•turall>o liberals and thooe who are p1o·gay will combat 1h1s rel1g1ous po 1tion Wllh two arguments. The first. .• rhc rcllg1ous pos1t1on·-to take a 'pccil11: example, the Catholic posi 11t1n that homosexuallly 1s an 'tntran .... 1i: d1,nrder'-is empirically ancor reel The 1rnmed1ate and disposi· t1ve rel1g1ous counter·r
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