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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 001. 1987-03-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/842.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-03-20). Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/842

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987 - File 001, 1987-03-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/871/show/842.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 334, March 20, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date March 20, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HOME DELIVERY? ADVERTISING? Call (713) 529-8490 montrose VOICE Gov't Announces National Blitz on AIDS News, inside HOUSTON WEATHER The weekend- Cloudy and mild nights. low in the 50s Warm and partly cloudy ~ ,, '' ~ ~ " ~ ~ "] -- - - M~~R~H 2~. 1~8_? - ISSU~-3~-- - - I; jl a~ '--d-ay_sh. _igh_in_?o_s.- ----~ News, inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 20 1987 Senate Adopts Bill on Designer Drugs By Merk La ngford UPI Capitol Reporter AUSTIN-The Texas Senate this week passed bills that would crack down on so-called designer drugs and speed labs and require the parents of unwed teen­age children to be financially responsi­ble for their grandchildren. The Senate also passed a House reso­lution Wednesday creating a Tax Equity Commission. Sen. Ray Farabee, D-Wichita Falls, sponsor of the child support bill, said the measure was not only designed to make parents financially responsible but also help prevent teenage pregnan­cies. 'It would di8courage parents from putting their teen children and their children out on the street," he said. "It would involve parents to a greater degree to influence their children not to become pregnant." Under the bill, the parents of unwed teenagers who have children would be financially responsible for those child­J"<' n, until they reach age 18, and their grandchildren. The bill, adopted on a voice vote, would not apply to the parents of mar· ried teenage parents or those teenage parents who can provide their own financial support. Farabee said Texas has the second highest number of teenage pregnancies in the nation and is first in the nation in the number of births to girls under age 14. In 1985, 18,600 babies were born to unwed Texas teenagers, Farabee said, adding that 80 percent of all pregnant teenage girls do not finish high school. Despite a current law that makes par· en ts financially responsible for children under age 18, Farabee said many teen mothers are being forced to seek public assistance for herself and her child or go without any financial support. Farabee also sponsored a bill that would amend the Controlled Substance Act to reduce the proliferation of"speed labs" and designer drugs. The bill, adopted on a 28-0vote, would require chemical manufacturers and retailers to keep records of sales tran· sactions of certain "raw" chemicals used in the manufacture ofmethamphe­tamines. Farabee said the measure would allow law enforcement agencies to find out who is buying the chemicals and trace them to the illegal manufacturing facilities. The bill would also reduce the manufacture of illegal designer drugs that can be made legal by slight changes in their chemical makeup. The bill adopts language in current federal law that makes illegal any drug that is substantially similar in chemical makeup and has the same effect as the controlled drug. The Senate also unanimously adopted the House-passed Tax Equity Commission, which will conduct a com· prehen~ive study of the state tax system and make recommendations for possi· ble changes. "In today's changing economy .. . we need to study what would be in the best interests of the state as a whole," said Sen. Grant Jones, D-Temple, the bill's sponsor. The Senate added an amendment pro­viding that the lieutenant governor and House speaker jointly choose the com­mission's chairman. Survey: Americans Favor Contraceptive Ads on TV By Aur elio Rojas LOS ANGELES (UPJ)-A majority of Americans believe television portrays sex as "all fun and no risk" and that broadcasters should encourage the use of contraceptives, a Harris Poll commis· sioned by Planned Parenthood says. Planned Parenthood Federation of America will use the findings of the poll in an effort to influence the television networks to broadcast contraceptive commercials, President Faye Wattleton told a news conference Wednesday. Seventy-four percent of the respond­ents favored contraceptive advertising on television after being reminded that the surgeon general had called for the increased use of condoms to reduce the spread of AIDS. Sixty-three percent of the 1,250 adults surveyed nationwide Jan. 28·Feb. l said they believed that most television pro­grams give the impression that sex is "all fun and no risk." Wottleton said 64 percent of those polled believe that watching television encourages teenagers to be sexually active and contributes to the fact that the United States has the highest teen pregnancy rate of any industrialized country-more than 1 million a year. "We know that the networks air more than 20,000 sexual references in one year, but birth control is mentioned only on rare occasions," Wattleton said. "Consequently, the message our teen· agers get is that sex is fun and exciting, but that there are no consequences to worry about." The survey also found that83 percent of Americans believe TV exaggerates the importance of sex. Wattleton said it also rebuts the con· tention of many local television stations and the three major networks that have refused to air commercials for contra· ccptives on the grounds they would offend viewers. "Our poll shows that a clear majority of Americans, 60 percent, believe that television stations should be allowed to air contraceptive advertising," she said. "Sixty-four percent disagree with the statement that contraception is too con· troversial to be mentioned in television programs, and a large majority of the American public-72 percent-would not he offended by contraceptive adver­tising on television." The survey reported that " .. . there is more support for contraceptive advertis· ing than there is for the advertising of beer and wine (53 percent to 45 percent), and for feminine hygiene sprays (58 per­cent to :J9 percent), both of which are frequently advertised on television." Wattleton coiled on the networks to show a more realistic picture of the world in thrir programming and com mercials, and said the networks were "completely out of step with the great majority of the American people" on the subject of contraception. Wattleton said that only 11 percent of Americans have a religious or moral objection to birth control and family planning. MARCH 20. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Neighborhood Sports Sports News from Montrose & Community Groups .. Morris Stays On Top of Houston Tennis Club Ladder Andrew Morris defended his No. 1 ranking in recent Houston Tennis Club action with a6-1, 6-1, 6-4 victory over No. 2 Mark Pack. Pack went on to defend his No. 2 position with a 6-4, 6-2 win over No. 6 Spike Siegel In other action Mike Houston defeated No. 10 Rich Corder 6-3. 3-6, 7-6 (7-2) . Corder was able to defeat Armi Alabanza 3-6, 6-3, 6-3. No. 14 Ronnie Moss won over Randy Lunsford 6-4, 6-4. New challenger Thalia Thompson fell to Gary Schwartz 6-4, 7-5. Shawn Paulk held onto his No. 13 ranking with a 6-2. 6-4 defeat over Schwartz. Lunsford met the challenge from Eff Reyes for the No. 16 rung of the singles ladder 7-5, 6-2 New doubles team Mark Pack and Spike Siegel took over the No. 2 doubles ranking from Bruce Willis and Rich Corder, 6-2. 6-2. The club 1s making good use of the early spring weather with some good challenge matches during regular club play from 10:30 a_m. to 1 :30 p.m. on Sundays and 7:30-9:00 p.m. Wednesdays For more inforamtionon the Houston Tennis Club, cal Rich at 524-2151 ..Garage Sale to Benefit Tournament A Trash & Treasure Garage Sale will be held in the parking lot of The 611 on March 28-29. 9:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Donations will help sponsor the Houston Billiards nvitational to be held May 23-25, 1987 Persons needing items picked up may call 529-7438 or 772-2895 The Montrose Voice Ifs The Place to Advertise IS BACK!! Now Open: Daily 4pm-2am; Sat. & Sun. noon-2am We're not ready but we're open! We Hope Houston's ready! To Celebrate, Join Us For Happy Hour All Day/ All Night Fri. March 20- Thurs. March 26 a: w :E DUNLAVY ~ RALPH ST. t;~ ~ E.J.1 MANDELL It's fine to park across the street at Ralph's parking lot until ours Is finished. 2517 Ralph Street at Westheimer 527-9071 4 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 20, 1967 Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. Community Center Proposals to be Presented at Forum Meeting Proposals received from Montrose area building owners to provide a faciltty to serve as a community center for Montrose will be presented at the next public forum meeting of the Montrose Activity C8nter The meeting will be held on Monday, March 23, 7:30 p_m_ at the Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd . Suite 201 Dwayne Wells. chairman of the community center committee, reported that between four and six proposals were expected by the March 20 deadline The committee is seeking public feedback on the proposals as a means of assisting the Montrose Activity Center Inc. board of directors m their negotionas with prospective landlords .. MCCR Presents Third Alpha II Th Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrect• in w1 present the Third Annual Alpha II Fun(d)ra1ser on Saturday, March 21 , at 7:30 pm_ A $7 donation 1s requested for the show which will beheld at the chi rch. 1919 Decatur Door prizes will be awarded .. KPFT Hosts Third Cajun Gumbo Cook-Off The Third Annual KPFT Cafun Gumbo Cook-Off will be held Sunday. March 22, at Clear Lake Park from 11 :00 a m.-6:00 p.m The benefit will be hosted by Pe-Te Johnson for the listener supported station. Ad mis~ sion is free. with gumbo. soda and beer at $1 The cook-off w•ll be held rain or shine at the park 1n Clear Lake. on Nasa Road One, just past the main gate into NASA Call 526-4000 for more information. AIDS Hospital Closed to Indigents The nation's first hospital devoted entirely to the treatment of AIDS vk­tims has stopped accepting new patients who lack the funds or insu­rance to pay for their care, hospital offi. cials announced. The Institute for Immunological Dis­orders operated by American Medical International has provided $2 million in services to impoverished patients since it opened in September. By August hospital officials expect the total cost of caring for indigent patients to have risen to $5 million. Those cost are far in excess of the $250,000 committed to indigent care by AMI when it signed an affiliation agree­ment with the University of Texas Sys­tem establishing the hospital. '"The highest priorities of the institute are to continue to provide care of the highest quality to its current patients as well as to continue its research program directed toward eventual elimination of this disease," the institute's board said in a prepared statement March 1:3. "The need for services by patients who are without health insurance and have no other financial resources has reached a point that threatens the abil­ity of the institute to serve these two priorities," the statement said . "'Therefore the in8titute is not cur­rently accepting new patients who are unable to pay for their health care." The ho.;pital serve• about 600 outpa­tienL• and has the capacity for 150inpa· tients but on March 14 had only 10 inpatients, a spokeswoman said. Indigent patients already accepted for admission and patients whose insu· ranee or funds lapsed after admission will continue to receive treatment, hos· pita! officials said. Officials said they also will counsel patients with AIDS-related disorders about financial problems and help them maintain their health insurance and other re80urces. The facility also will help indigent patients gain admittance to Jefferson Davis Ho•pital, a county operated facil­ity with an outpatient AIDS clinic and 16 beds for inpatients. ~n Jaltcnwriam PAUL A. REICHENEKER June 7 1963- February 20. 1987 Paul passed away at his Houston residence February 20. 1987 with his mother and father by his side Paul 1s survived by Mr and Mrs. George Reicheneker: three sisters. Angie. Lynette. Amy. and a brother, Dennis, all of llllno1s A service was held m his hometown in Illinois A memonal service will be held in Houston on Sunday, March 22. 1 :00 p_ m at MCCR Pai ·1 wr11 bf" truly missed by his many fner s wh1 kn~·w and loved him GEORGE PROCTOR F >b,,.ary 2 1952· March 11 1987 Gee g ft this life at 4 45 p.m. on March 11 1n a Washington. DC. hospital from com­phcat1ons due to AIDS Formerly of Houston. George was involved through the years with set design for the Alley Theatre. Townhouse Theater Windmill Dinner Theater, and Theater Under the Stars. He also designed the Rip· cord's float for the Gay Pnde Day Parade m 1983 The float went on the win the Grand Marshal 's Award of which he was very proud George 1s survived by his parents and his llfemate Jeff Oodd of Washington. DC Among other things. George will be remem­bered for his never failing good humor and constant smile_ In fact. he 1s most likely smiling down on us all right now Interment will be in his hometown of Pawhuska. Oklahoma Ol..-"POL.CV TlwUvnll' .. V~ll honor_. IO~elhe h9 ol 01.U ,~rs,. and lrrll!ftdl, OI Nlmw• ')I ')Ur,--., "'""'an ~ frllJ!ds Ol•ela"- sl'loukl ptl)v>d9ut • •lh ...,..._ ._,.,...,.. !Dlb.,- ,,_ tle'P"Onel There•"D Nrget.." --· Southwest Funeral Directors 528-3851 1218 Welch Houston, Texas Servicing the Community (• :·-;::: •) - ET PLEASERS 8787 So. Gessner off Hwy. 59 776-3383 Open Mon.-Sat. 15 Years Grooming Experience I (Dogs & Cats) SC~ Pet Supplies [jjiiil DET Available $5 off Any Service with this Coupon Direct Burial or Cremation CREffiAT!On SERVICE mTERTIAT!OTIAL® Operated by James H Murphy Funeral Homes priced $395 from ~ 363-9999 Another DWiJ £a2kA Enterprise ... K.J. 's ~~ NORTHSIDE Mon-Fri Happy Hour 12-7pm s1so Well & 51 Beer FRIDAY & SATURDAY-No Cover SUNDAY Free Beer Bust & Bar- B-Que 3-7pm $3 Cover Lip Synch Contest 10pm, Anyone Can Enter, Cash Prizes MONDAY Airline Night- 51 Bar Drinks and Beer for Airline Employees TUESDAY Bar Employees Night 51°0 Well & Beer for Bar Employees Welcome Kledren (formerly of Cheers) to our staff Come by and see our New Look! 11830 AIRLINE-445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldine- Bender) r 20°/o to 50°/o OFF ALL MERCHANDISE •• • MARCH 20th thru 23rd FRI., SAT., SUN., MON. AT 1424-C WESTHEIMER {AT WINDSOR-ON THE CURVE) 522-5156 MC-VISA-AM EX DINERS CLUB CARTE BLANCHE ALL DISCOUNTS AND CREDIT SUSPENDED DURING SALE A ~LY..:: ..... ..• . .• . :• . .• : . •.. •.. • . . :• :• .• : • .• .•. •. •. .: ..• .: • ..•: .• ..•..•..• ..• :• :• .•: • .•.•.•.•.• .• : .• .•. •. •. •. •. •. • .• .•. •.• .•• . ••. •.• •.• . •. •.• .• .••. • .• :• .• :• .• .• .•. •. •. • .• : .......... . .... .• .. .• .•. .•. •. .•. •. .•. .• ...• : . . . . . ..:.•. . ...•. ..•. .:. . ..•. ..•.. ...•. ..• . ..•. ..•. ..•... .. . .• .: .. :. .. :. ............... . . •••••••••••••• • • • • • • • • • • • • ..•.. ..• ..•. .•.. .•.. •.. ....•. ....• ..•..•. ..•..• ..• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .• : • .• .• • • • • .•. •. .•. .• . • • • ••• • •• •• •• •• •• ••• •• • •• • •• • •• • •• • • • • •• •• •• • • • ••••••• ~ . . . •• •• •• • • •• • • •• • • 6 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 20, 1987 "For heaven's sake, Roger - stop dragging Iha! one leg." Voice Comics 3-JI) ''Whoal Smells Ilk& a French primal& house In here." Exploring the mystery of reality ended for Neal with the acquis1t1on of the fish . o, 0 • 0 . 0 o~ ~ ,~i ~- 3·]'0 Another enlightened person, living a life of continuous and never-ending, stringent self-examination. MARCH 20, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 7 Nation's Controversial No.2 Health Official By Tamara Henry WASHINGTON (UPl)-Dr. Robert Windom has explained health issues to patients for 27 years as a practicing physician and for JO years as a Florida television host, but as the nation's No. 2 health official, he may have some real explaining to do. Windom, who has been assistant secretary of health nine months, was criticized earlier this month when he tried to explain to a Senate subcommit­tee why he wanted only a 28.5 percent increase in federal dollars for AIDS research and education. He also landed in hot water late last year when he mistakenly told reporters at a luncheon that the Taiwan A flu vaccine should be taken by everyone under 35 years old and over age 65, wh•n, in fact, key health officials recommended the vaccine only for per­sons with severe health conditions. And in lees specific matters, Windom struggles to explain the recent rapid technological advances within the health care industry and refuses to pre­dict the future, only to say: "I hope in the next period of years we could have every disease prevented by certain forms of medical intervention, like vaccine." Part of the problem stems from the job itself. As assistant secretary for health, Windom directs the activities of the Public Health Service, a component of the Department of Health and Human Services, which with a $360 billion budget is one of the largest federal agen· cies. Windom has served as assistant health secretary since June 1986, after Texas Firm Optimistic in Finding a 'Super' Vaccine SAN ANTONIO !UPl)-Testing of a single vaccine designed to target three spxual disPase-AIDS, herpes and hepatitis B-is under way at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Ref'enrrh . "The approach looks very promis· ing," Ronald C. Kennedy, an associate scientist at the San Antonio research center, said Monday. "What we're doing now are potency studies to determine how powerful it is in small animals," Kennedy said. The basis for the experimental vac· cine is a weakened smallpox virus, Kennc>dy said. New York scientists, who first devel· opt.•d in I 985 a combination vaccint.• by splicing herpes fiimplex II and hepatitis B genes into the weakened smallpox, invitcid the foundation to add genetic material for AIDS. Scientists at the San Antonio center last month cut into the smallpox genetic code machine-made parts of AIDS virus genes. Work is under way to make sure the right AIDS genetic material spliced into the unusual vaccine produces the desired antibodies. Some studies have indicated certain antibodies produced in more traditional vaccine approaches actually help the virus infect white blood cells "If you make antibodies do the wrong thing, you enhance infection." Kennedy snid. "We are still trying to determin<' which pit'<'£'"' 8lay in and which pit.•('('~ t·omc> nut," he ~aid being nominated by President Reagan and confirmed by the Senate. Before joining HHS, he was a practicingphysi· cian, for 26 years, specializing in inter· nal medicine in Sarasota, Fla. For JO years, Windom produced and was the host on regular television pro­grams on health topics in Florida. The Public Health Service includes the Health Resources and Services Administration, the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administra­tion, the Centers for Disease Control, the Food and Drug Administration, the National Institutes of Health, and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Dis· ease Registry. "It's a constantly evolving and mov­ing organization," said Windom in an interview. "On top of that, we get new diseases, new threats-tampering, for example-and we get problems of new diseases, like AIDS, and other manifes· tations of old diseases. "The Public Health Service has evolved and is going along with the times, and even been ahead of it at times," said Windom. Acquired immune deficiency syn· 10 Million May Have AIDS Virus GENEVA (UPl)-As many as JO mil· lion people are believed to be infected with the virus that causes AIDS, the director of the World Health Organize· !ion's AIDS program said Thursday. Dr. Jonathan Mann said between 4 percent and 15 percent of healthy adults in some parts of the world carry the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and related retroviruses. But the figure is as high as 60 percent to 80 percent in high-risk groups, Mann told an international symposium on immunization. Mann said prospects appear encou­raging for a vaccine against HIV, the virus that causes acquired immune defi· ciency syndrome. People with the virus do not necessarily develop AIDS. 11However, the development of a vac· cine of proven efficacy and safety, should it be feasible, is a long-term objective that, at best, will take several years to accomplish," Mann said. He said the current 42,000 reported cases of AIDS worldwide "represents only a fraction" of the real total because of "reticence in reporting from some areas combined with under-recognition of AIDS and under-reporting to national health authorities." It is more significant, Mann said, that 91 countries have by now officially reported cases of the disease to WHO. That figure is more relevant when assessing the "extraordinary scope and unprecedented urgency of the HIV pan· demic," he said. "The numbers of AIDS cases pro· vides, at best, an inaccurate and, at worst, a misleadingly optimistic view of the real extent and intensity of HIV infection," Mann told the symposium. "WHO estimates that between 5 mil· lion and 10 million persons are cur· rently infected with HIV," said Mann, an American. Testing possible AIDS vaccines will be "complex, difficult, and time· consuming," he warned. "An AIDS vaccine for general use will not be available. if at all, before I !191 nnd i~ unlikrly to h(·available before the mid·l990•," Mann said. drome has become a key focus of the Centers for Disease Control based in Atlanta. The National Institutes of Health recently announced the development of a new vaccine for whooping cough that may eliminate the serious side effects of the current vaccine. A pilot study of J00- 150 children 18 months old is about to start in Massachusetts. Windom describes the NIH as "the mecca of health research in the world," starting in 1887 as an attic-room labora· tory in the Marine Hospital on Staten Island, N.Y. It is considered the symbol of high-technology medicine; the last· resort clinic where people may turn for the latest expenmental therapies when conventional remedies have failed. Even the Public Health Service itself had humble beginnings. It came into being in 1798 as the Marine Hospital Service when President John Adams signed into law an act providing for the "care and reliefof sick and disabled sea· men." With all the recent changes in the health care field, Windom rejected the idea that society may be moving toward socialized medicine. "This pendulum has been swinging for a long time, you know," Windom said. 0 There are trends that go back and forth." •••••••••••••• HENRY'S 1 PHOTO •••••••••••••• WE'VE MOVED Now located at 408 Avondale --The Montrose Voice Building­Around the corner from our old location OPEN DAILY 9-6 CLOSED WEEKEND The Hills Are Alive ____ ~ Thurs.-Sun. nights 6 MONTROSE VOICE . MARCH 20. 1967 No Condoms for Texas Prison Inmates HUNTSVILLE (UPl)-State pmon officials, citing security and ethical rea­sons, said they have decided against distributing condoms as a method of curbing the spread of AIDS among Texas inmates. Prison doctors instead will launch a massive educational campaign to teach inmates more about the disease, said Dr. Vonda Reeves, director of the AIDS program at TDC. "This is an institutional issue that basically. at this point, we've made a decision not to issue the condoms," she said. "This is not a firm decision, but at this point we're following the lead of the two larger prison systems (California and New York) in the United States." "As the disease changes, so will we modify our protocol and procedures to adapt, to try and address what is hap· pening with it." The Texas Criminal Justice Task Force has recommended that condoms be distributed to Texas prison inmates as a possible way to help curb the spread of AIDS in state prisons. Dr. Lawrence Cunningham, TDC medical chief of staff, said security was a major consideration in deciding against such a policy, Corrections offi­cials ere concerned about the potential for inmates' i:;muggling drugs in prison with the help of condoms. he said. Prison officiali- ah10 are concerned the diRtribution of condoms would promote homosexuality Indians Get AIDS At fir•! it was thought AIDS was a non­Indian problem, but 32 cases have been reported among native Americans since 1981, according to the government's Indian Health Servke and Centers for Disease Control. The cases were reported in 14 states as of Feb. 20, according to Pat Johannes, communicable di~ease activities coordi­nator for the CDC in Phoenix. Ariz. The total number of deaths from AIDS was 17. with 44 percent of them in California and New York. The age of the patients ranged from 17 to 53 years old. "There is enough evidence to suggest that despite the remoteness of many Indian reservations, even those com· municable diseases dependent upon lifestyle for transmission will affect Native Americans. and considerable effort mu•t be put into their identifica· tion, treatment and prevention," Johannes wrote in an IHS newsletter Burton AIDS By William C. Trott United Preaa International Burt Reynolds is still irked by rumors that he has AIDS and credits girlfriend Loni Anderson with helping him deal with the reports. "It's real difficult to have any dignity and class when people are saying you're dying of a disease and saying the things they were saying about me," he says in an interview that was to be broadcast last week on "Hour Magazine." "Loni was sensational. When they write about this, somebody should write about how much class and dignity she had through it all. "If, in fact, I had this dreaded disease, then she should have it too, or!e would think. Nobody ever talked about that. Nobody asked her opinion. It was if she didn't exist." In the meantime, Reeves said, prison officials will initiate an infonnafional drive on AIDS within the prisons. "We're launching a massive program of education for inmates," Reeves said. "It will be group education sessions and we will utilize pamphlets and audio vis· ual materials." Cunningham and Reeves spoke with reporters following a daylong TDC seminar for about 400 prison medical workers on the medical, ethical and legal issues of AIDS in prisons. The seminar is the first of several work­shops the TDC will offer its personnel. Fifteen TDC inmates have died after developing acquired immune deficiency syndrome, the latest this month. At least five others have AIDS and 32 more have tested positive for the AIDS virus. Two suicides have also been reported among inmates diagnosed with AIDS, Reeves said. The TDC does not screen inmates for the AIDS virus and does not routinely isolate all AIDS patients, she said. Currently, the TDC isolates only those AIDS patients in high risks, such as known homosexuals or intravenous drug users, Reeves said. We're Houston's Largest Gay Audience. We're the readers of the Montrose Voice We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice. We're about 27,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 26,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewhere around $6,000,000 weekly on the things we buy-c1othes, partying at night, apartments, cur~ and repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. (Yes. that'1 $6 million weekly.) Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask-by advertising to us through our newspaper. The Montrose Voice THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE DIAL 529-8490 /or ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY Hefel h(, .... """ logtJfect 1"9 liq1.11n B•se dt1t .. bul•OFI 10<Xl0 C')(I'" Fr1d•1 j!IOOQ COP•H Tuesct111 1empor.,111 IUl~ed) Atsu"1'9d pass on 1•t1 l•ctOf 2 9 Tl'lt-1 Hl•,.,•!e<I ;~~:::_:~o~.~=s::~.1,:,*~':'.;!'~~!::.·,~:.~·;=•~~~;~e.,..·~~9 .. 11o•no1 MARCH 20, 1967 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Coming to Ms. Vacant Lot Contest & Carnival Ms. Vacant Lot Contest Rules NO HIGH HEELSl!I Footwear must consist of work boots, tennis shoes, combat boots, flats, tllp flops or western boots only! NO RECORDED MUSIC!!! All musical accompaniment must be In a live format-weshtub band, kazoos, spoons, finger cymbals, washboard, spoons, bells, harmonica or even rhythm hand clapping. ALL ENTRANTS MUST BE REGISTERED BY 3- 31-871 NO ENTRANCE FEE!! THE FOLLOWING CATEGORIES WILL BE USED AS A BASIS FOR JUDGING: 1. EXTEMPORANEOUS SPEAKING covering reasons as to why you think you should become the first Ms. Vacant Lot. Each contestant wlll be asked one question from the panel of judges. 3 minute llme limit! 2. BEST ATTIRE befitting Ms. Vacant Lot. Costumes should be In the genre of bag ladles, vamps, strumpets, hobos, gypsies, harlots, or lower Westhelmer evening attire. 3. HATS or HAIR end FINISHING TOUCHES TO MS. VACANT LOT'S WARDROBE. Size Is no obstacle. Ingenuity a plus. Long trains acceptable. 4. TALENT and POISE. The reigning Ms. Vacant Lot will be confronted with some of the most unusual situations and circumstances which will require a quick wit and response time and much compsure during her reign. This segment of the contest consists of two parts: (4 minute time llmlt for each part) 1. An Impromptu situation, presented by the Judges, representative of one of the various duties of the reigning Ms. Vacant Lot. 2. A presentation by the contestant demonstrating how he or she would cope with a dlfflcult situation which Ms. Vacant Lot could encounter during her reign. 5. SLEEPWARE .. . ??7 The categories of 4. TALENT and POISE end 5. SLEEPWARE will be judged on Wednesday Night, April 1, el 9:30 p.m. Flnel Judging will be Saturday Night, April 4, approximately 10pm. Judging will be done by notorious and Infamous crazed people of our community. Each category has 1 possible high score of 10 points. Final score will be closest to a perfect 50 point score. JUDGES' DECISION FINAL A GAY- LESBIAN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY CONTEST $100 1st Prize, and 2nd- 3rd prizes for Ms. Vacant Lot Trophy for Best Booth Judging Based on Creativity and looks For Businesses and Organizations; Time slots are available for campy, demented commercials. (5 min. tlmellmlt) MC'd by Tondalaya ------,T------ REGISTRATION FORM FOR MISS VACANT LOT 4/ 1/87 & 4/4/87 Real Name ------------ Drag/ Stage Name Daytime Phone Address Deadline for Reglsterelng Is 3-31-67 No Entrance Fee Signature Mary's 527-0669 ~--------------------- Registration Form for Booth Space for Ms. Vacant Lot Carnival 4/4187 BusJ Org. Contact Person ------------ Phone Address Commercial Time (Y/N) -------- ---------­No Booth Fee. Donations Appreciated. Maximum booth Size 8'x8' Nature of Booth:----- ---­Mary's 527-9669 ---------------------- 10 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 20, 1967 Spring Has Sprung "Soap" by the Staff of the Montrose Voice Today marks th(• vernal equinox more popularly known as the first day nf spring. The poets say this is the s(>a~on when the mind wanders to far away pla­ces with dreams of adventure and rom­ance Does this mean there will he a !;Udden ;nflux of people to Montrose? Rick Clyne and A.J. celebrating at Venture-N Don't think St. Patrick looked quite like this The ~eason kicks off v..·ith the official opening of two new watering holes. E/J's isn't really new. They held court over on Richmond for years. Now they invite everyone to their new spot on Ralph Street off We•theimer. The Camp Closet is open on Tuam. It's the same building that housed The Hole. o Food and More Food The Pot Pie is sti11 running their spe­cial breakfast for late nighters and early risers. The feast includes two eggs, two strips of bacon, two sausages and two pancakes. Difinitely a gastronomi­cal eye opener. The 611 Breakfast Club (another eye opener) is having a bake sale tomorrow, March 21, at noon benefitting Omega House. Ron promises some delectible edible.. o Behind the Eight Ball Rlck Clyne is Pxpanding his successful pool tournaments at the Venture·N to include Mary's on Sundays and Thurs $*********************** .:: Priva*cy-Sec urity .:! : 'Jlrj : : : North Star : f Fence Co. f ! Free Estimates ! £ 7 Days a Week : • Cedar-Redwood • : Wrought Iron-Chain Link £ i• • 694-9113 E ! Free Walkgate with this Ad : ***********************' days. Sign up times are Sunday at 2:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 7:30 p.m. o Slightly Off the Path Rita Boulevard at Rooster's is getting too old to behave the way she does. Someone needs to have a Jong talk with the old girL Problem is, you have to catch her between shots. The area surrounding the 200·500 blocks of Westheimer should be renamed theJockev Short Hall of Fame. The Viet Nam Restaurant and Andy presents the Finest Food In town at the Best Prices Lunch or Dinner Special $12 a couple Choice of Appetizer, Entree, Dessert, with complimentary sake Open: 11am-10pm Sun., 11am­mldnlght M-F, 11am-2am Sat. 3215 Main at Elgin 526-0917 BETTER LAWilS & qARDEilS T otul luwn mclintenclnce Cornrnercicl!-Residenticl! • Ldndscape • Trnsh Removdl • Ch1mne4 Sweep • Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprinkler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN Between Dirty Sally's, Michael's and Rooster'.'!, didn't know so many attrac· live mrn liked to dance with so little on. And finally, three big kisses and a kmg sized hug welcome back to Cha Cha. What did you do to those folks in San Francisco. The Houston repre1:;en· tativei; to your farewell fei:;tivities returned looking as though they had been run over by a cable car. Herb keeps mumbling something about a "San Francisco Treat." Jesse must hat•e been having a good time last Sunday ~Pl~y ~Safe! Rendezvous Club (The Old Boobie Rock) Tel. 527-8619 1100 Wes1heimer Monday-Saturday 9am-5am Sunday 3pm-5am Monday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Tuesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm Wednesday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Thursday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 2pm-9pm ~0.1 • Friday & Saturday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 9pm-12 midnight Disco Beats of George from early hours and alter hours til dawn! Sunday 50¢ Schnapps & Draft Beer 3pm-9pm After Hours Every Night Dance until Dawn Daily MARCH 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 MAKE THE RIGHT CONNECTION • • on Houston's outrageous New conference Call our exciting phone service has become the rage In callfOrnla, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Now we have made It avallable to gay men right here In Texas! we are the first and biggest company In the field-our conferences are HOT!! When you dial you will be connected to an ongoing, UNINHIBITED CONFERENCE CALL, with up to nine men from all over Houston. NOT PROFESSIONALS! Just nine Interesting men, llke yourself, anxious to make new acquain­tances. LIVE! NOT A RECORDING. Top or bottom, short or tall, young or old, they're all here! It's only $2*-cheap by any standards, and billed discreetly to your phone bill. No credit cards are reciulred. Your anonymity Is guaranteed. Call 713-976-9696 now and see what you have been missing. • HoustJ~: 713-976-9696 ' This call ls only $2 In most of the 713 area codes. Matching is random and you may not hear another caller aM vet still be charged. ca11 at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi· tlonal toll charges may apply In some areas. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 20, 1987 'Much Ado' Over at Main Street characters, whether their orientation is central to the plot or not. John also points out a trend away from some­thing. Every year ther have been sev· era] new, lousy rewrites of Medea. This year, thankfully but surprisingly, there are none! Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke Montro•e Voice I know some of you are afraid of Shake­speare. You associate his name with blown-up ham actors chewing the scen­ery. Or with archaic language that's dif­ficult to understand. Or ancient people fighting over things that don't matter to us now. Besides, how can anything that's supposed to be that good for you ("the greatest English dramatist that ever Jived'") be any fun at all? There is nothing to fear and much to enjoy in the Main Street Theater pro­duction of Much Ado About Nothing. There is no overacting. If anything, some of the characters are a little under­acted. Nearly everyone, however, is very believable in a very modem way. These people might live next door, if you live in River Oaks. Spoken with clarity, accompanied by actions and emotions we hold in com­mon, the words are actually very easy to understand. These are not street people. I, for one, am glad of that. Right now there are too many plays colored red, what with profanity and other gutter vulgarities. In this production, by and large, here we have the muted pastels one imagines he might here in any boardroom." Steve Garfinkle plays Dogberry in MST's "Much Ado About Nothing" in love with each other. How can they admit it to each other without losing face? Can the day really be saved by Dog­berry (Steve Garfinkle), a pompous lower-class ass with a flair for mala­propisms. Shakespeare did have one habit that The distinguished acting couple of Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn are recipients of the 1987 Alley Award. The Tony Award·u:inning couple will discuss their careers in "A Conversation with Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn" Saturday, March 21, 6:00 p.m. on the Alley Theatre Large Stage There are two plots. In one, handsome Claudio (Dane Cruz) falls in love with shy Hero (Vicki Luman). His friend Pedro (Tim Plaumbo) helps them become engaged. But on the evening before their wedding, instead of a bache­lor party, they're tricked by nasty John (Ray Simmons) into believeing that Hero has been sleeping around. Claudio reacts much as any conservative fiance would today. Her father (Vaughn C. Johnson) takes his side, too. How can poor Hero ever prove her virginity? In the other plot, Beatrice (Claire Hart-Palumbo) and Benedick (Jerry McCulley) are always reading each oth­er's beds. They might remind you of Benson and Krause. But then their friend tricks them into realizing they're not all ofour contemporary playwrights do. He always looked atthedownsideof his funny situations and the funny side of his catastrophes. It makes for a well­rounded play. But with all the insults, the teasing and other word play, the overall mix in this play is hilarious. To point up the play's relevance and to excuse any small errors in authentici­ty that might be made to help the a~dience understand the finer details, director Rebecca Greene Udden has turned this show into a play within a play. When we arrive, the actors are doing their warm-ups on stage. Kath­leen Lipscomb's sets all face away from the audience. Only half of the period costumes ever reach the theater. So the actors are partly in costume, partly in rehearsal clothes. The whole effect is interesting, at times very pretty. It is never a1lowed to intrude into the action of the play. In fact, it has no inter­action with the play itself whatever. Several of Shakespeare's plays were witten to be plays within plays, but this wasn't one of them. However, this approach is not with­out solid precedents. In Shakespeare's day, the actors wore hand-me-downs from rich fans. They made no attempt to fit the clothes to the locale and time. Evening in a garden, sure-but a hundred years ago in a foreign country, forget it! There's even a famous example where the playwright himself mentioned a clock in a play set long before they were invented, right there in the dialogue. In our own day, Richard Burton's most successful Hamlet was done completely in rehearsal clothes. If it feels good, do it. !fit works, emo­tionally and aesthetically use it. Bless historical accuracy! Send it to heaven and get it out of our hair! (Unless, of course, it would work better.) So, if you've never seen Shakespeare, this would be a good spot to dip your toe in. If you have, this is a welcome visit with an old friend. Whatever, this is a most enjoyable show. o Notes Don't forget the Houston International Fe•tival, all thi.o week! The Alley Award, Houston's most prestigious theater honor, is given each year in recognition of a lifetime's efforts. This year the husband and wife acting team-Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn-are the worthy recipients. Their careers, separate and together, have spanned many decades and many styles, originating roles in several mod­ern classics. May they live long and never retire! Well, all of the entries arein for Choe· olate Bayou's Preston Jones New Play Symposium. There are some 200 plays from all over the country and only three can be chosen. John Pierson, the sym­posium's coordindator, tells me that each year's crop often reveals trends By the way, they've been able to bring John Henry Faulk's one man show back. It will open March 26 for a three week run. So, if you couldn't get tickets the first time, here's your chance. The Houston Community College pro­duction of Kopit's Chamber music, which opens there this Thursday, has already won several top honors at the Texas Junior College One Act Play Competition. When Babes in Arms was translated from the stage to the screen, it became the first of the several in which Judy and Mickey rounded up the kids to do a musical in an old barn. Now, real kids are doing the original at the HITS Uni­corn Theater. The Human has traced along Hous­ton city streets to form the giant outline of a man, In the works since 1982, the first phase is now done. You can get maps and see an exhibit at Diverse Works. Then, if you drive the route, you will find permanent markers at the top of his head and the tips of his hands and feet. The tour will take you through a wide diversity of Houston neighbor­hoods, but not ours. His right bicep touches Westheimer down at Baldwin. Eventually, the sponsoring group hopes to paint the entire route to make the silhouette viHible from the air. Richard Fluhr and 100 of his students from the Art Institute of Houston will be completing a mural for the City Wide Club of Clubs Family Recovery C•nter (4715 Caroline St.) this week. They should have it finished by the evening of March 20. This 145' x 8' mural will fit inside the walls of the existing, two­year- old mural there. Prepaid RSVPH must be in by March 2.5 for CACH & Business Volunteers for the Arts' !Ith State of the Arts Lun· cheon, March 30 at Two Houston Cen­ter. Writer Philip Lopate, artist Derek Bosher and curator/ critic John Cald­well will discuss The Creative Arts in Houston: The Challenges, The Oppor­tunities. $12.50. 658-2483. o Celebrate! March 25, 1903-A court of inquiry was Randy Brecker and El1ane Elias perform at the Spring Jazz Festival of the Houston School for the Performing and Visual Arts towards certain subjects. From the ones I've read (I'm helping to judge it.), this year's trend seems to be towards gay ordered to investigate charges that Sir Hector "Fighting Mac" Macdonald, one of the most admired generals of the Brit· The Li·Mei Hua Chinese traditional dance group is one of the many popular international performers in the Houston International Festival March 19-29, 1987 ish Imperial Army, was homosexual. Rather than face those charges, he com­mitted suicide. B'days: 20-William Hurt, Hal Linden, Carl Reiner. 21-James Coco, Edgar Buchanan, Flo Zigfield. 22- Rosa Bonheur, Stephen Sondheim, Andrew Lloyd Weber. 23-Joan Collins, Joan Crawford, Chaka Khan. 24- Harry Houdini, Bob Mackie, Steve McQueen. 2.5-Hoyt Axton, Elton John, Arturo Toscannini. 26-Leonard Nimoy, Diana Ross, Tennessee Willi· ams. "Society attacks early when the indi­vidual is helpless."-B. F. Skinner (born ~'~rch 20) o Openings The Butler Did it! (Country Playhouse, 20)-Yes, but which one? Sixth Annual Member's Exhibition (Houston Center for Photography, 20)­Freebies Vance, Davis, Spanky (Comix Annex, 20 & 21) Young Uck Kim, violinist (Jones, 20)-John Nelson conducts the HSO, A Conversation with Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn (Alley 21, 6:00 p.m.)-ONO! An Evening on Bourbon St. (First Unitarian, 21, 6:30)-spicy food, cold drinks, jazz by Tom Benjamin and his Gang. Costumes encouraged. ONO! Ragstreet Rascals (Houston Zoo, 22, 2:30)-Freebies. ONO! Alley Award Evening (Texas Com. merce Bank Lobby, 22)-honoring Hume Cronyn and Jessica Tandy. RSVP 228-9341. ONO! Need a Car Today? Call Ralph Gilbert at Tex as Brokers • 200 Cars to Choose From • Your Job is Your Credit • Instant Financing­Low Monthly Payments $100 off with this ad 1433 N. Shepherd ..... . 868-2365 Cowboy Hat Band (Tranquility Park, 23, noon). Freebies. ONO! David McCullough (UH Hilton Build­ing, Constellation Room. 24)-a lecture by the writer-historian, host of TV's "Smithsonian World." Freebies. ONO' Ebony Brass (Martha Hermann Square, 26, noon)-Freebies. ONO! John Henry Faulk (Chocolate Bayou, 26)-folksy humorist The Middle Ages (Alley, 26)-a funny look at the demise of the WASP empire. Spring Jazz Festival (HSPV A, Den­ney Theater, 26 & 27)-Different each night with guests Randy Brecker and Eliane Elias SCHEHEREZADE! John Nelson, Conducting Young Uck Kim, Violinist Rlmsky-Korsakov: Scheherezade Mozart: Violin Concerto No. 5 Gluck: Overture to Iphigenia In Aulls Fri., Mar. 20, 7 p.m. Friday Night live! pr ... conc:ertlechff"ee: Frl 1:10 p.m. let. 7:)0 p.m. lun.. 140 p.m MARCH 20, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 13 ~ 1102 Westheimer 522-3332 Now Serving Fresh Seafood Trout Red Fish Cat Fish Flounder Shrimp Oysters Also Serving Char Broiled Steaks Beer & Wine Belgian Waffles Ice Cream Thanks for your continued support of Aid for AIDS Two Weeks Free on All Units and a One Year Membership to ~ (Monlhty Fns Not Included) Remember, you don't Just get a neighbor, you get a friend at ~ (jREENWA'( PLACE Exdusi\OC Adult Apa.rtmcnts 3333 Cummins 623-2034 c6l JOHNSTOWN PROPERTIES - 14 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 20. 1987 -- ~ Government Announces Nationwide Blitz on AIDS By Jan Ziegler UPI Si 'n ·e Writer WASHINGTON (UPIJ-The govern­ment, beginning a nationwide inforrna· tion blitz to combat the spread of AIDS, will recommend that tens of thousands of Americans who received routine blood transfusions be tested for the AIDS virus. The U.S. Public Health Service, in a bulletin that was expected to be released Thur"day, will say physicians should consider offering AIDS tests to people who had transfusions from 1978 when the disease first began appearing to April 19R5when blood banks began bet· ter screening, NBC News reported It also v-.111 suggest tests are more important for thm;e who received multi· pie transfusions and for sexually active recipients because if infected they would be more likely to pass the disease along. M. Roy Schwarz, director of medical education for the American Medical Association in Chicago said on the NBC "Today" program that a "very, very small" percentage of the approximately 34 miJlion to 36 million Americans who received blood transfusions between 1978 and 1985 may find themselves in a high·risk" situation-people who received multiple transfusions and live near New York. San Francisco and Los Angeles. Schwartz said the odds are 0.06 per­cent that a person would be found to have the virus. ''But I think if you're a person who had multiple transfusions, those numbers don't mean anything. You ought to know if you arc at risk ." Estimatei; of those who received the transfusion1o; and may have the AIDS viru" range from 12,000 to 20,000 people. Rep. Henry Waxman. D-Calif., told CBS's ''The Morning Program" that the government does not have the funds for AIDS testing or counseling. "And we don't even have the confidentiality in place, which would allow people to feel free to come forward for that testing." Waxman Raid there are waiting lists for people who want to be tested in New York. San Francisco and Los Angeles. "We need more testing facilities. We need more people to counsel." Waxman said testing is "going to be a very. very expensive propasition. If we ask people to pay for it themselves, just the testing may well be $50 to $200." The government information plan released Monday does not address test· ing, concentrating, instead, on mass media advertising and school education to get people to be more cautious about their sexual contacts and is also designed to induce drug abusers to avoid sharing needles "Our bbt hope today for controlling the AIDS epidemic lies in educating the public about the seriousness of the threat. the ways the AIDS virus is trans· mitted and the practical steps each per· son can take to avoid acquiring it or spreading it." Health and Human Servi· ces Secretary Otis Bowen said in a pre­face to the plan. The acquired immune deficiency syn­drome virus is spread by intimate sex­ual contact and contaminated blood or needles. People are being urged to remain in strictly faithful monogamous relationships or use a condom. The plan was released Monday by Dr Robert Windom. assistant secretary for health. before a subcommittee of the House Committee on Government Oper· abons. The plan uses as a base the 22 guide­lines on AIDS issued between 1982 and 1986 by the Public Health Service and calls for cooperation among all brancheti of government, professional and service organizations and the pri­vate sector. "Everyone muist be aware of behavior that puts them at risk," the plan said. To reach the public at large, the plan recommends a mass media campaign under contract with a major advertising agency, forming a coalition of public and privalP sector groups to exchange and coordinate education efforts, set· ting up an information clearinghouse and continuing to support a toll-free AIDS hotline, in existence since 1983. Among the recommendations for edu· cation of school·age and coHege stu· dents are a national coalition on AIDS education, development of programs especially for black and Hispanic youth and providing extra help in areas with a heavy percentage of AIDS cases. "The scope and content of the school portion of this AIDS education effort should be locally determined and should be consistent with parental values," Bowen's statement said. Public Health Service spokesman James Brown said an advertising agency will be contracted in June, while the national coalition and clearing­hom- ie are in the works. Plans are just beginning for the school coalition. he said. The cost of starting programs called for in the plan will be covered by the $70 million education appropriation in the 1987 budget and the $104 million requested in the fiscal 1988 budget, he said. The financing does not, however, include another tactic under considers· tion at PHS: direct mailings about AIDS to every household in the country, Brown said en 11. :J UJ z :J I­(.) ~ :n () 0 z 0 ~ AUTOMOTIVE :J ~ SPRING SPECIAL ~ ~· Air Conditioning ~ Lil Check & Charge 26.95 011 • Lube 24.95 Coollng System Service 27.95 1411 T'"lt 1] ::. 0 i,'. 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS Legislators Grill Health Commissioner on AIDS Programs By De' Ann Weimer UPI Capitol Reporter AUSTIN (UPJ)-Conservative law· makers grilled State Health Commis· sioner Robert Bernstein March 13 for not advocating abstinence as a way for gay men to avoid contracting AIDS. 'OrganizC"d ag(>ncies have joined in what I consider a propaganda cam paign of delu•ion, (by saying) that this disease AIDS is not particularly related to the homosexual community," charged Rep. Rill Ceverha. R-Dallas. Berrn;tein and Dr. Ron ,J. Anderson, chairman of the Board of Health, appeared before the House Appropria· tions Committee to testify on the Department of Health's budget for the next biennium. Some lawmakers chose to question Bernstein and Anderson on the Health Department's seeming failure to lobby for stricter laws to control the spread of AIDS. "I certainly cannot tell people when to have sex and who to have it with," Bern­stein said in response to Ceverha's sug· gestion that the state consider making sexual activities between homosexuals of higher illegality than its current level of Class C misdemeanor. 14What bothers me about the whole thing is somehow or another our official agencies, yours included, are trying to perpetuate a myth that says 'don't worry homoRexualR, this is not a homo· sexual disease,"' Ceverha said. "And what we're telling those people is to go ahead and go on about their business, practice safe sex," while the accumulated evidence shows that gays still run the risk of contracting the dis­ease, he said. "That is totally unfair to those young mdividuals who are involved in that activity. I have never seen anything come out that said, 'Don't engage in homosexual activities because you stand a good chance of contacting the disease and you're going to die,"' Ceverha said. Anderson argued that sodomy laws are not effective because they drive AIDS victims underground, making it impossible for health officials to track the epidemic. "I'm a First Baptist and so I'm not trying to tell you I'm for an alternative lifestyle," Anderson told committee members. "But at the same time, I think sometimes we let our prejudice towards homosexuals get in the way of the pub· lie health problems we have to deal with. "The most fundamental of us are hav­ing to work this out and sort out our prioritieR." he said Comparing the di Rease to an epidemic of •mall pox, Rep. Tom Waldrop, D· Corsicana, qupriE.·d Bernstein on thE" feasibility of quarentining AIDS patients and carriers. Unlike small pox, Bernstein said Komeonr must "go out of their way" to contract AIDS and quarentining would serve no purpose hecausE.• the disease 1s spread by intimate• Hexual contact only. Anderson worried that discrimina­tion against AIDS victims has placed the burden of carrying for victims of the disease on the state. Individuals identified as carriers fre~ quently loHe their jobs, homes, and insu­rancp because their tests results become public. MARCH 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 New Special! Customer Appreciation! Take a Break at the Hours of 2pm and 8pm Whatever You are Drinking at That Time Have One On Us! Saturday and Sunday Liquor Bust 4-7pm $5 All the Well You Can Drink Monday Beer Bust $1 6pm-'til 75¢ Schnapps and 50¢ Draft 7 Days a Week Coming Attractions: • Help Us Break Open Thurs. our Patio for Summer • April Fool's • Cha Cha's Homecoming •Easter Jockey Short Contest • Hats- n- Heels 220 Avondale $200 in Prizes Showtime 11:00 529-7525 Chutes 1732 Westheimer 523-2213 Your Party Bar Fridays Male Strip Nite 11pm $100 First Place $25 Second Place ' . . . Sundays Lube Wrestling 4pm $25 per match Lovers Welcome Divorcees Desired Roommates Interested or Singles Coming March 28: Mr. Almost Butch II, 11pm Home of Eagle Leather & Short People of Texas (SPOT) MARCH 20, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 17 ~-------- .... --a Anti-Viral Drug Fights AIDS-Related Infection s10°0 i I off i By Larry Doyle UPI SC'ience Writer CHICAGO (UPl)-An anti-viral drug appears effective in controlling an unusual oral infection associated with the AIDS virus and could also lead to therapy for people chronically infected with a form of mononucleosis, researchers reported March 13. The drug, called desiclovir, is not likely to be a treatment for acquired immune deficiency syndrome, but Dr. Deborah Greenspan of the University of California·San Francisco said researchers want to see if it could help prevent someone with the AIDS virus from developing the deadly disease. "All of this is quite speculative, but I think you could say we're opening up some very promising avenues for research," Greenspan said at a meeting of the International Association for Spring breakers Fear AIDS DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (UPl)-The scene is the same-college students from the North soaking up sun and suds on Florida's beaches-but the fear of AIDS apparently has ushered in a time of less sexual promiscuity. Although the collegians said in a recent poll that warnings about acquired immune deficiency syndrome had not dampened the party atmos· phere of the annual 350,000-student pil­grimage to Daytona Beach, most admitted the AIDS epidemic has made them less promiscuous this year. "You don't go around jumping anyone you want to, like last year," said Ric Arcadi, a sophomore at Mercyhurst College in Erie, Pa. To help combat the spread of AIDS during spring break, a Catholic priest in the spring break mecca of Fort Lauder­dale undertook a beachfront "safe sex" campaign to distribute condoms and pamphlets to college students. This action fo llowed Surgeon General C. Everett Koop support of the use of con­doms to fight the disease. The ma kers of Trojan condoms, in a stepped-up promotional campaign fol­lowing Koop's report, said they also planned to pass out samples and litera ture this week at Daytona Beach. Students surveyed by The Orlando Sentinel seemed to agree with Koop. "We're worried about it,'' said Gina Johnson, a sophomore at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va. "You can get it so many ways." "We've heard it over and over, 'If you go to Florida (for spring break), don't pick up any diseases,"' said Nancy Neil­son, another sophomore at Old Domin· ion. Brian Fierro, a junior at the State Uni­versity of New York Maritime College, the Bronx, said it was tougher this year to grt women to dance in bars. But he also said he and his friends were being more selective in seeking dates. As an a lternative to using condoms to fight AIDS, a Volusia County Christian group called The Spring Break Chal­lenge is promoting the idea to students that abstention from sex before mar­riage is the best precaution against AIDS Challenge spokesman Bernie Yan­dura said the students need religion instead of sun, sex and beer, and that providing a birth control tool-such as condoms-to students only encourages sexual activity. Dental Research. Greenspan, an associate cJinical pro­fessor of oral medicine, and her col­leagues have been working with patient afflicted with hairy leukoplakia (HL), a whitish patch that appears on the tongues of people who are infected with the AIDS virus but who have not been diagnosed with the disease. HL is technically considered a form of AIDS-related complex, and is consi­dered a marker for later progression to a full-scale case of AIDS. Proposed AIDS-Free Card Draws Mixed Reviews ARLINGTON, Texas (UPl)-Health counselors and gay community leaders fear that cards being sold by a Michigan company, which guarantees that the bearer has tested free of AIDS and serious venereal disease, will impart a false sense of security to those being tested. Peace of Mind Inc. earlier this month said it planned to open an office in the Dallas and Fort Worth area to perform a range of tests and sell the warranty cards at prices between $99 to $649. AIDS educator Dianne Garcia, who works with the Oak Lawn Counseling Center in Dallas, said the program could give those tested the wrong idea. She said it takes four weeks to six months before a person exposed to AIDS, acquired immune deficiency syn­drome, tests positive. "If you don't tell people that, they may not be aware there is a wi ndow of time where it may actually be just form· ing the a ntibodies, but not be detecta­ble/' Garcia said. Daniel T. Michaud, co-founder of Peace of Mind Inc., said the card indi­cates only that the bearer was free of disease when tested. "Now, they must be concerned with (those sexual partners) they meet since the date of the test," he said. The company will test customers at regular intervals. If results are nega­tive, the clients will be issued plastic cards with their photographs, descrip­tive information and the date of testing, he said. Private physicians and local health centers offer the same battery of tests. Michaud said Peace of Mind will per­form two AIDS tests every six months for $99. The next plan, for $225, tests for AIDS, genital herpes, gonorrhea and yeast infections on the first visit, and then again for AIDS six months later The deluxe package, for $649, includes tests for venereal disease every three months. Bruce Bernard, director of the hospi­tal laboratory and vice president of Har­ris Methodist-Fort Worth, said tests alone are worth little without interpre­tation by a physician. "Without the presence of a clinical confirmation, lab tests are pretty much a useless venture and a waste of money," he said. Craig Hess, volunteer coordinator for the Dallas Gay Alliance AIDS resource center, also is skeptical about the pro­gram's worth. "I question the accuracy of it(testing) and what people are going to do with the information once they receive it,'' Hess said In a recent experiment, 14 people with HL were either given desiclovir or a dummy drug. All eight people treated with desiclovir experienced completely or dramatically reduced lesions. No change was seen in the control group. Greenspan said the finding was par­ticularly interesting because HL appears to be caused by the Epstein­Barr virus, the agent responsible for infectious mononucleosis and which is linked to several cancers. Tissue sam­ples taken from the patients showed no presence of EBV after the drug was administered. "What is exciting about this study is that this drug is clearly effective against Epstein-Barr virus," she said "What role, if any, this will have in AIDS I really don't know at this point." Scientists have speculated that EBV, as well as other viruses, may be neces­sary to cause a person infected with the AIDS virus to develop the disease. Greenspan said that if this is the case, desiclovir may help prevent progression to AIDS in some patients. About 90 to 95 percent of adults carry the EBV virus without becoming ill, but some apparently develop an unusual chronic mononucleosis-like syndrome, in which they experience depression, lethargy and an inability to concen­tratf>. Dr. Gary Holmes. epidemiologist with the CDC. said he had not seen Green­span's research, "but if she's got some-­thing that controls EBV, she's really got something." He added, however, that acyclovir, a drug related to des1c­lovir, has been shown to be ineffective in controlling EBV I CUP lHIS AD and attach it to I I your next order for S 10.00 off I 1 any of the following items: 1 (Minimum Order $50) 1 1 • Letterheads • Postcards • Brochures • Multipart Forms, I • 2-Color Printing• Flyers I • Contracts • Menus I • Resumes • Envelopes I • Amouncements • Invitations I • Business Cards • Door Hangers • Report or Booklet I Copying • Invoices I MON~~~~~=~~~:~~i:.~~~~ I 10% Dlacount I -=-- SPEEDY I PRINTING SERVICE I OF TEXAS Fast Rehabfe Service. ! --·~ Exc•llent Quality, Law Cost I @ • lu:.ff 5400 BEUAIRE . BLVD. 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An attorney representing two of the men said the ad may have been placed by the same person or group that sent letters to neighbors and families of 150 people who signed a petition condemn· ing anti·homosexual activities at the University of Chicago. Postal inspectors are investigating the incident, attorney Robert Dachis said. The University of Chicago said it is albO cooperating with a poHceinvesti­gation. "Whoever typed them is rather clever," Dachis said Wedne8day. "There are no overt threats here, and actually they are worded carefully enough that there is nothing defama· tory per se." The phony ad describing a University of Chicago student who wanted to meet other gay men ran about four weeks ago in the Chicago Reader newspaper. a weeklv distributed free throughout the city At least eight men who responded have been the targets of hate mail, Darhis Raid. One of the letter.s sent to a neighbor said, "~ proof of this individual's homosexuality, we are including a pho­tocopy of a letter which he recently wrote to a R<H'.'alled gay matching adver­ti ~ ement. [f you are not convinced, call them up and ask them about it." Underlined and capitalized at the bot­tom of the letter was the statement, "Avoid this homosexual a t a ll costs." One of the men who responded works at a Chicago school. Letters saying he was homosexual were sent to his neigh­bors, landlord and the principal, assist­ant principal and teachers at the school. "!had just moved to Chicago and was trying to meet new people," the man, who asked not to be identified, told the Chicago Tribune. "! responded and heard nothing. Then last week, my neighbors started coming to me, show­ing me these letters." Dachis said letters were sent to two supervisors and a colleague of one of his client.s. and the other client received a letter addressed to "resident." The letter was written on stationery with the heading "Great White Brother· hood of the Iron Fist" and marked with an inverted triangle containing a fist and a dagger. A skull and crossbones were at the bottom of the page with the Latin words, "Oderint dum metuant," which roughly translate to "Hate me but fear me," Dachis said. A letter to the employer of one of the gay men said he was a "health threat to you and your organization," Dachis said Under the body of the letter were the words "Friends of the City." Dachis •aid he suspects the phony ad waR placed by the same person or group rei;ponsible for the recent mailing to neighbors and families of the students and faculty membens who signed th<' University of Chicago petition. The petition condemned anti-gay activities on campus, induding hate mail sent to openly gay students and bumper stickers placed on buildings tha t said, "Fight AIDS, Cas trate all Gays." The Windy City Times, a gay news­paper in Chicago, warned readers this week not to give their full name, phone number, or address when responding to personal ads. montrose VOICE HOUSTON. TEXAS ISSUE 334 FRIDAY, MARCH 20. 1987 Published weekly Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston. TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contenls copynght 1967 Office hours. 8am·6pm Henry McClurg wl>l'aher·«11to< Linda Wyche m.,.tgmg edr"" David Aoumfort product.on SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland a<Jv•rt•amg d1'eclor Ken Boge·ac:cc1emt ••«L1r111• PO$lMA.$TER 5.,,d •dcl•ffl coueclkms to •Oll AYOndail& Houl!Ol'I TX 77006-3028 Suoacnpflon r•t• .,, :S (by Vatee camet or US MllflJ Si 25'*w"4l(uPI021UUNI $65peryet1r(S211rte11sJ or S32 50 per II• lnOfll'- (26 """-SI N-11CnaJ adv«tis1ng f91"9unl•t,.,. R1~I ~arlr.eting. PO Bo• tm, Plaunl!Md NJ 07061. 12011 7S4-•343 FinaJ «lv""*""9 dNtf/1nt1 Alt dfsOlay ads 5pm 2 d!iys I pnortoPUble.lflOt'ldilte Allcilluol•edads2pm1daypftOt I to publlC&tton date.. Note• to •dYM•HU Ad~ert•ing fate ld'ledule Elghl·A •• •nectiv• Aonl ,, 198& R.aponaibfli/y We do not -.ume t1n•ricla1 rnpons1blJ1ty lor datmS by llOvert•rs bul rMOers are ashd to 9Ch',.. _th,e., ,M..,W,.mSOga P9f ol any suspocion of fractuletll or deceptrv9 al'ld ausptCIOnS will be 11w•toga1ed NrN~ ,.,.,.,,. Uri•ted Pr ... lriternatoriaJ Pest Trivia: Q.: How many eggs are contained in one femal German roach capsule? A.: 30-48 eggs which hatch In about 28 days at room temperature. Pest Control 223-4000 Licensed & Regulated by Structural Pest Control Board of Texas HAIL. 'fO iHE CHI£~ Star War s or Bust By Arthur Hoppe If you already have a headache, there's no rea8on to read this column. It's about the administration's current attempt to reinterpret the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty so that it won't interfere with Star Wars. News stories have detailed the hubbub this new policy of "broadly interpret­ing" the treaty has raised in Congress and with our NATO allies, but none l read told me what the argument was about. I finally came a­cross an account in The Defense Moni­tor, a widely respected publication of the Center for Defense Information in Washington. Seeing that the fate oflife on this planet could conceivably hinge on the issue, I thought I'd do my best to outlinP it here. Bear with me. The ABM Treaty was signed by Presi­dC'nt Nixon and Secretary Brezhnev in 1972. Its basic purpose was to ensure the policy of Mutually A8sured Destruction or MAD-the policy we have relied upon to ensure nuclear peace, rightly or wrongly. for the past ·10 vears. ThuR the trC'aty limits each powC'r to protl•<·ting either its capital or one mi!'l silt• site with ARM,-thereby leaving the reHt of l•nrh rountry rompletely vulnl•rahll' to incoming enemy missiles. To furthrr hol,ter MAD, the treaty al"o limiti-; both us and the Soviet Union to "no mort• than one hundred ABM launtht>rs and no more than one hundn-d ABM interceptor missilet-o." Most important. both countrieH agreed undt>r the treaty "not to develop, test, or deploy ABM systems or compo· nents which are sea-based, air-based, space-based or mobile land-based." In other words, the only missiles that could be developed, tested or deplo_yed were land~based missiles in fixed sites. So what about Star Wars? It is, of course, a space-based system specifi­cally forbidden by the treaty. To shoot down thousands of incoming Soviet missiles and dummies, it would possibly require more than a hundred interceptor missiles. And lastly, it is designed to defend the entire United States, thus abrogating MAD, the verj policy the ABM Treaty was written to ensure. How then can the administration "broadly interpret" the treaty to permit it to go ahead with Star Wars? The Defense Monitor says the new interpre­tation is hinged on the advanced tech­nology involved, such as laser and particle beams. Agreed Statement (D) which accompanied the ABM Treaty says, "The parties agree that in the event ABM systems based on other physical principles .. . are created in the future, specific limitations on such systems and their components woulrl be subject to discussion." The administration apparently feels this allows them to create and deploy any ABM system they want using "other physical principles"-as long as they talk about it afterward. But the Defense Monitor says this clause "actually makes the Treaty more strict." It refers only to fixed land-based missiles using other principles, for that's the only kind the treaty permits. And it requires that "specific limita lions" on even these systems can be negotiated-certainly before and not after they are deployed. STERLING Paint and Body Cente.,. 1107-D Upland Dr. Just N.W. of K•ty Frwy & Wllcresl From Minor Dents to Major Restorations Financing Available 932-9401 Open 24 Hours Phone tor Appts. between 9pm-8am MARCH 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 So much for Star Wars. As I pored through all this turgid Ian· guage and convoluted reasoning, I had the noble feeling that I was doing my duty to become a well-informed citizen in a democracy-the kind of feeling you get when you wade through a ballot argument. But the more I thought about it, the more sure I became that the administra­tion would interpret the treaty any damn way it pleased. Logic had nothing to do with it. And if for some inconceiva­ble reason, it was stopped from irration­ally interpreting the treaty, it would simply break it-just the way it broke the SALT lI agreement. We don't observe treaties that no longer serve our purpose. So l felt as though I had waded through all the ballot arguments only to find that my vote didn't count. And, more and more these days, it doesn't seem to. How's your headache? 1987 (SF.) Chronicle Publishing Company 'Bugs' in Phone May be Real AURURN. Ala. (UPI1-That crackle sometimes heard in a phone may mean the line is hugged-literally-by cock­roaches, i-opidE!rs or wasps, says an expert hired by South Central Rell to debug its equipment. South Central Rell officials estimate the company spend~ 22 milhon a year repairing insect damage to telephont.> equipment Arthur Appel, an as!->istant enlomol· ogy profe.!-isor at Auburn University, said Wednesday that cockroaches, fire ants and wasps are the most common insects found in phone equipment, and they ran cause extensive damage. "Wasps and hornets can get into equipment and cause personnel to be stung," Appel said. "Also, spiders spin­ning webs across terminals-especially when the humidity is high-cause mois­ture to collect on thetenninal, leadingto shorting out or glitches in your tele­P~? ne co!lnection. Termites ... can actually bore through cable lines." Fortunes Communicating with Old Friend Puts Leo Back on Course By Mark Orion Your Horosco for Fr1dt1y e11enmg March 20 through Friday morning. M.,c#J 26 1987 ARIES Relief from the confusion that started off March still isn't in sight. but a good guide m thts time 1s to emphasize the spirtual over the physical. TAURUS-Something weird and wonderful comes right at you from a most unlikely place There's no way to plan for or expect who or what 1t 1s, but wowee and wahoo' What kmd of love is this? You're going to love 1t, whatever 1t 1s that's for sure GEMINI -First you want one thing. then another First a friend. then a lover You can't quite make up your mind_ Per­haps you're too analytical in an area where analysis has little value. So. step back. En1oy the times CANCER-You're the playboy of the zodiac this time-playful. cheerful, child­like and funloving. You're able to give darker moments your own light touch. That should make you popular. espe­cially with one person who needs that special gift LEO-Last time you were showing someone else how to do 1t, but this time. someone's showing you. In trying too hard to be everything you want, this per­son may put you off. But 1s too much really too much? Communicating with an old friend will put you back on course VIRGO-You're going to find out what friendship 1s for Whether it's an old friend or a new one. a casual or a best friend. something special 1s going to happen for the two of you together, and bring you closer than you've ever been. LIBRA-Been missing magic and excitement? Here 1t comes, back with a bang_ Fireworks in the springtime for you this time. Explosive creative energy vibrates through all the aspects of your life. Lots of lights and action -------- SCORPIO - Th tn k twice• Something that looks like an offer you can't refuse. or someone who looks llke a perfect ten could be just what you don't need. You don't have to develop a full-blown para­noia. but be more cautious than usual. Don't take the bait SAGITTARIUS-Your mind is working overtime on all those pieces you have to put together Just when life 1s feeling like the world's biggest 11gsaw puzzle, some­one or something from the past shows up to point out the missing part CAPRICORN As someone moves away, someone else moves closer Don't let the end of one relationship blind you to the poss1b11ities a new one has to offer Learn the value of saying botr goodbye aod hello in 1ust tre right way AQUARIUS-Christmas in the spring? You've got a present coming that will make you feel like it It's something you deserve, but also something unexpected Untie the ribbon and open the box Can you believe this one? PISCES It's your move. Someone expects you to make the next one. too Don't let all of life's busy stuff get in the way of what's most important Take care of business. then take care of that next move. Make 1tl - ~'ON"TAo"Si VOie£- In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the 1ioice 20 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 20, 1987 'Beyond Therapy' May Be Just That l/eft to right) Tom Conti, Jeff Goldblum, Julie Hagerty, Chris Campion, Christopher Guest and Glenda Jackson in "Beyond Therapy" Houston Screens by Bill O'Rourke Muntrosr VoicE' o Beyond Therapy Beyond Therapy? Well , if you've been reading my theater columns, you'll know that Christopher Durang is not my favorite playwright. Oh, he cooks up a funny premil"e and a good beginning. He adds an enjoyable middle that's controver­sial enough for several good arguments. The man simply cannot write an end­ing. Sooner or later a revolver is fired, his idea of a climax. Then. rather than resolving anything. everything unrav­els fairly quickly However, I can read box office figures as well as the next man. Durang does have a following. The production of Beyond Therapy at Houston's Stages was quite popular. So one may wonder . .JC,..;,o.;;.;:11~ ~ what happened with the first movie of one of his major works. Jn some ways, the Stages production was a lot better. Charlotte, the childish psychologist, was a lot more fun. Two­time Oscar winner Glenda Jackson is woefully miscast here. She seems to miss the point entirely. Everything she does is RO adult and dignified. The show involves a bisexual man, Bruce (JeffGoldblum), who finds a lady, Prudence (Julie Hagerty), through a personal ad. He obviously did not clear the ad with his lover, Bob (Christopher Guest). Naturally, this upsets Bob. Rather than accord the lovers' rela­bonship the same dignity they would a marriage, thus being forced to under­stand Bob's outrage, the filmmaker's attitude can be summed in in a quote from a pre~s release, "Bob, a psychologi­cally unstable individual intensely jeal­ous of his live.in lover." Bob (Christopher Guest), Bruce (Jeff Goldblum) and Prudence (Julie Hagerty} find themselves in a strange and uncomfortable situation in "Beyond Therapy" On stage, Bob was a fruitcake as in nutso. But, he was no stranger than any of the other characters. In the movie, most of the other characters have been deflated a little, down to basically life size. It now looks as if Bob has been singled out for more ridicule than the rest. And no longer do Bruce and Prudence keep visiting a metaphysically empty restaurant where the waiter is never seen. The waiter is now threaded throughout the entire work and his character changed in ways that might best remain a surprise. He is played by Chris Campion, whose boyish beauty was thought by many to be the only redeeming value in Polanski's Pirates. The restaurant and its habitues actu­ally becomes oneofthemostinteresting characters. It's now Bruce's own fault that he is never waited on. On the other hand, the naturalness imposed on the script by its new medium does reign in the worst of Durang's excesses. This new discipline does pay off at times. Director Robert Altman adds some weirdness of his own, though. For exam­ple, he thought of this as a French-style farce. So he shot it in France with a French crew and supporting players. This story about Yankees whooccasion­a11y wish they could go to Paris now has the feel of a foreign art film. I wouldn't be surprised if this film does eventually do well in art houses. However, I wonder about its success in general release. I don't even really expect it to find a large cult following. But I've been wrong about Durang's audiences before. each killed individually. Both entertain­ingly and inventively, each expires for some specific reason. Partly because of that, perhaps partly because of a fairly weak musical score, the screen is not crammed to bursting with action . The pace is more natural , less frenetic. The aim is for more sus· pense, more meaningful action . The sex is very graphic, but only ver­bally. The pretty boy does eventually get his addenda threatened and then shallowly slashed with some shears. Then that act is questioned by a mafia don. But at neithertimedoweevengeta rear shot. The plot is not handed to the viewer on a silver platter, either. You have to work your own imagination to link ever ything together at first. I liked the cha! lenge. The film's return to conservative values might make it feel a little old­fashioned, but I would welcome more like it. Too many people have lost sight of what "grat4itous violence" means. o Openings Burglar-Whoopi Goldberg and Bernie Rhodenbarr The Good Father (Belair) My Sweet Little Village (Belair)-the Czechoslovakian nomination for the best foreign film Oscar One Woman or Two {Greenway) Lolita' The Loved One (Rice Media Center, 20)-0NO! True Stories (Greenway and River Oaks, 20) Bernie Rhodenbarr (Whoop< Goldberg) and Carl Heffler (Bob Goldthwait) plan how they will circumvent the police and find the murderer for the crime Bernie is suspected of in "BurRlar" o Heat Burt Reynold's latest movie. Heat, is probably not going to be as big a hit as Lethal Weapon. That's really sad, becau~e it's a better-made movie. The pretty boy who has a twisted psy­chotic need to hurt other people is the villain, not the hero. When he says that he didn't do anything wrong when he savagely beat a woman because she's a whore and it's impossible to be cruel to a whore, you know not only that his days are numbered but also that they deserve to be. The hero does not glorify in violence. It is only something that he does well The necessity of it gives him headaches. This is the kind of movie where you should count every bullet. But the film­makers don't stop there_ They accord human lifl' the same honor. There are only as many people on each side of the conflict as there logi· cally must be. Those who must die are Tutti a Casa (MFA, 20)-Everybody Go Home! ONO! To Be or Not to Be; Miss Tatlock's Millions (Rice Media Center, 21)-the Jack Benny original. ONO! La Voglia Matta (MFA, 21)-Crazy Desire. ON01 Fundi: The Story of Ella Baker (Rice Media Center, 22)-biography of a woman wh c-ommitted her life to the American civil rights movement. Risate di Gioia (MFA, 22)-Joyous Laughter. ONO! Bad (River Oaks, 2:1)-by Andy War­hol 81"1 (River Oaks, 25)-by Federico Fel lini Nosferatu (Goethe Institute, 26)­Klaus Kinski as the vampire. Free­bies. ONO! The Rules of the Game (Rice Media Center, 26.)-0N01 The 'Fawn Phenomenon,' MARCH 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 cal Association's media psychology div­ision, "the press loves people "'ith some kind of double identity." an Unknown Becomes Famous Not just any identity, Sears said "It has to be b1g·league." "It would apply to athletes who are quite accomplished in some other area, a mixture of the physical skill with some other more intellectual skill. What's interesting about Bill Bradley (the Democratic senator from NewJersey)is that he was an accomplished basketball player and is also a politician." By Jan Ziegler UPI Science Writer WASHINGTON (UPI)-lt has become a familiar phenomenon-pretty but unknown female caught up in national scandal is noticed by national media, receives modeling, nude photo and movie solicitations. That's what happened to Fawn Hall, Lt. Col. Oliver North's personal secre­tary, as it did to a number of other women including Rita Jenrette, former wife of former Rep. John Jenrette of South Carolina, convicted in the Abs· cam scandal. A former model on the local scene des cribed by her friends as a "straight arrow," Hall toiled in obscurity end now finds the same organizations that may have been uninterested in her services before willing to pay hundreds of thou· sands of dollars for the privilege of pub· lishing or promoting pictures of her. Psychologists attuned to media trends find nothing surprising about it at ell and point out several ingredients that lead to such instant celebrity. "First of all , beauty is an important factor," said Dr. Stuart Fischoff, a psy­chology profes•or at California State University at Los Angeles and a screen writer. "It determines whether you get convicted of crimes, whether you get sentenced. It sells papers." Research has also shown what may seem obvious: attractiveness attracts. For instance, one study showed attrac­tive women in cars stopped because of flat tires on the West Side Highway in New York received many more offers of help than would a homely woman or one who otherwise does not fit the current Teenager Runs Up a $5,000 Phone Bill OAKLAND, Calif. (UPl)-A chef who took up two extra jobs to pay for more than $!),000 in telephone charges from rallR to pornographic and other 976 ser­vice numbers by his "bored" teenage son was eventually let off the hook. Cle•ter Jones, a chef for a San Jose airport restaurant, received bilJs total­ing $1i,:Ji3.44 that accrued from Dec. 5to Dec. 24 when his son Kevin, 15, made hundreds of calls, some for up to 10 hours, to about 20 different pornogra~ phic and other service numh<'rR with a 976 pn•fix. Although Pacific Bell hn< n policy not to C'harge fomilieH for first-time abu!-ieof 976 twrvirrs by an un.supervised minor the company di.sconnected Clester .Jonf's's phone and gave him three months to pay the bill. Jones took two part-tim<' jobs, working90 hours a week , to make the payments. When one of Jones's checks bounced, Pacific Bell cut off service to his sister, who had co-signed for his telephone. The family complained to the Public Utilities Commission and service was restored to his sister. The company, recognizing it had held Jones accountable against its own pol­icy in this case, gave him an apology and cleared his account. "I'm very sorry to say this, but evi­dently this particular case fell through the cracks," Pacific Bell spokeswoman Lynn Jiminez said Tuesday, acknowl­edging the $5,313.44 mistake. Kevin Jones, who said he was unaware the calls carried fees of $2 each plus toll charges, explained why he placed the calls: "I was bored." definition of attractiveness, Fischoff said. Witness Rosemary Woods, mature and a bit stout, who melted into the background while everyone concen· trated on the 23 minutes missing from Nixon's tapes. "It could play to men's fantasies about attractive women," Dr. David Sears of Los Angeles, head of the Ameri­can Psychological Association's mass communications division, said of the Fawn Phenomenon. "There's a market for appealing to men's fantasies, just as there are markets for other things." Fischoff said men tend to be in posi-tions of power and decision-making jobs, so women are more likely to be targets. If women were in power, he said, men could find themselves in Hall's position more often. But why is she suddenly so interest· ing to, say, the big modeling agencies. 14 Attractive women are a dime a dozen in the modeling field," Fisch off said. "If you're going to sell someone, you have to have a little sizzle with the steak." The Iran arms scandal, he said, "gives her a distinction she didn't have before." In addition, said Dr. Michael Broder, president of the American Psychologi- "If you're a steam fitter, am I inter­ested." said Fischoff. "No." For Sears, who admits to being a bit of a cynic, it's all a matter of feeding the media's "voracious appetite.'' "It doesn't seem very complicated here. You have a big scandal and a good·looking woman. Put the two together and you've got a good story for a few days," he said . • • • Pia Sale. A Message from the Society of J.O.E. A PRIVATE ORGANIZATION MEMBERSHIP INQUIRIES may be made Tuesday & Thursday 8·9pm. Friday &Salurday 11pm· 1.:30am. Sunday 6-9pm. Memberships are limited to reasonably-attractive out-of-the-closet II berated adult gay men who are secure with their sexuality. Yes. we dtscnminate-on the basis that you must be in reasonable condition for your body type and (even more important) that you possess a mental attitude that will contribute to the overall atmosphere at J 0 E J O.E. meets at the COTTAGE PLAYHOUSE at 611 PACIFIC (look for the Play Safe Flag) 22 MONTROSE VOICE ' MARCH 20, 1987 More LaRouche Followers Rounded Up by the Feds By Thomas Ferraro LEESBURG, Va. (UPl)-Nine follow­ers of political extremist Lyndon LaRouche, including a key aide, were arrested Tuesday night at sites near his fortress headquarters on charges of bilking victims out of millions of dollars in a scheme to raise money for affiliated groups. The roundup, the third in six months involving LaRouche adherents in rural northern Virginia and elsewhere around the country, was prompted by an indictment handed up March 3 in New York charging 15 LaRouche fol­lowers with crimes ranging from fraud to grand larceny. LaRouche's cult-like political organi­zation has been under investigation in recent months by federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. The inquiries have generally focused on fund-raising activities. On Oct. 6 a federal grand jury in Bos­ton capped a two-year probe by indict­ing 10 La.Rouche associates on charges of credit-card fraud and obstruction of justice for allegedly making unlawful withdrawals from accounts of contribu­tors. On the same day, about 300 federal, state and local law officers seized two truckloads of financial records from LaRouche headquarters, prompting a Loudoun County Grand jury on Feb. 17 to indict 16 LaRouche followers and five LaRouche-affiliated groups on charges of state securities fraud. Those individuals and groups were accused of using false and misleading promises to solicit about $30 million in SPECIALIZING IN ••• loans nationwide from about 3,000 peo· pie. most of them elderly. LaRouche himself has not been named in any of the indictments. Last fall, LaRouche, who lives in a heavily fortified, $1.3 million estate out­side Leesburg, vowed to defend himself against any arrest, but later said if charges are brought he would surrender peacefully. Le.Rouche, 64, a four-time presiden· tial candidate, and his followers have denounced the previous grand jury indictments as unfounded political harassment and part of a conspiracy by the White House and the Kremlin. Lt. Terry McCracken of the Loudon County sheriffs office said that, acting on the New York indictment, 16 law officers arrested nine people Tuesday night at their homes and LaRouche­affiJiated businesses near their leader's heavily fortified and guarded headquar­ters. David Fish low, a spokesman for New York Attorney General Robert Abrams, said arrest warrants also were to be issued against four people in New Jer­sey, one in Illinois and one in Califor­nia. The New York indictment, handed up March 3, was not to be unsealed until Wednesday, but was made known to reporteris in Virginia on Tuesday night. Fishlow said the New York charges stem partially from information gathered by the grand jury in Virginia. The suspects arrested Tuesday night were identified as Edward Spannaus, 43, LaRouche's 1984 presidential cam­paign treasurer and now one of his legal Real old fashioned Butcher Shoppe service ... You name it and we'll cut it to your order! Depend on the Kroger meat department for the best of everything. The standards for quality don't stop here, take the Kroger trim for in­stance. We have U.S. choice beef that cooks up tender, juicy and del­icious every time. We offer Top quality pork, U.S. choice lamb, prime veal, and grade A poultry. OPEN 24 HOURS advisers: his wife, Nancy Spannaus, 43; Cathy Wolfe, 36; David Pepper, 49; George Canning, 36, Linda de Hoyos, 37, Paul Gallagher, 42; Merielle Kron­berg, 39, and David Shavin, 34. They were cited with a total of 42 counts involving charges ranging from conspiracy to fraud, the fraudulent sale of securities and grand larceny. Fishlow said the defendants are accused of "borrowing money that they never intended to repay. They signed promissory notes dating back to 1979 that were never repaid." The Loudon County sheriff's office issued a statement saying prospective victims of the alleged fraud were con­tacted at airports or shopping malls by La.Rouche volunteers, then received follow-up telephone calls or visits by the defendants, who often sought dona· lions. "When donations were no longer forthcoming from a victim the defend­ants would ask for the loans at above­market interest rates to be secured by promissory notes,'' the sheriffs state­ment said. "Though interest to the loans were sometimes paid, payments were irregu lar and checks often bounced either because they were stopped or because funds were insufficient to cover them," the statement said. LaRouche has zig-zagged across the political spectrum during the past two decades. At different times he has been called ultra right and ultra left. He has called the Queen of England a drug dealer and Henry Kissinger an agent of influence of the Soviet Union, and has accused the International Monetary Fund of mass murder by spreading AIDS through its economic policies. His followors generally belong to the National Democratic Policy Commit­tee, a name similar enough to the Demo­cratic National Committee to cause concern by the larger party and confu­sion among voters. Judge Lets Sexual 976's Stay Alive AUSTIN (UPl)-A state judge Tuesday temporarily blocked enforcement of a Public Utility Commission order allow­ing Southwestern Bell Telephone to drop service to two firms that provide live, sexually explicit messages to callers. Travis County District Judge Joseph Hart granted a temporary restraining order sought by Omniphone Inc. and Audio Five Inc., which provides the ser­vice in four Texas cities. Bell contended the companies-by providing the messages through the "Dial 976" exchange-violated their service agreement with the telephone company. But lawyers for the two companies argued that disconnecting the message service denied their clients' constitu­tional rights to free speech. Bell bills and collects payments for companies that use the 976 service, which is available in Texas only in Houston, Dallas, Fort Worth and San Antonio. Call 529-8490 and l'ou will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose FEIFFER ~ MILITARY FASHIONS FRENCH.,, GERMAN .,. ITALIAN ... wwn VINTAGE * COME m~ THE FASH ION ARMY AT ..... ~ INTERNATIONAL MILITARY SURPLUS HDQRS. MON· SAT 11·6 '12J'"""'-oG .... -OOOU•otr,_ s '21-2111 J CWI AW w f.17. / ~ 1119( /al)'( w H6 JIJfO fv1.!/ A~ MEUT EVIWIU6. Al's Insurance Service 4108 Fannin Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 529-0140 AUTO LIABILITY SR-22 FILINGS YOUNG DRIVERS LOW DOWN PAYMENTS LIFE COMMERCIAL AUTO BONDS PROPERTY HOMEOWNERS NOTARY SEllVICE MARCH 20, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 23 Government Wants to Redefine AIDS By Joe Parham ATLANTA (UPI}-Federal health offi­cials, saying statistics show 10 percent of AIDS cases go unreported, have pro­posed a new definition of the deadly dis­ease that will cause the number of reported AIDS cases to increase sharply. The revised definition is contingent on the reactions of state health depart­ments, epidemiologists and other health·watch organizations, hut a spo· kesman for the national Centers for Dis­ease Control said the proposal is common with new diseases. "We hope this expanded definition will be adopted for national reporting purposes by the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists at their May meeting in Santa Fe, N.M.," said Dr. Tim Dondero, chief of the surveil­lance and evaluation branch of the AIDS program at the CDC. The CDC currently excludes people who have been diagnosed by physicians as having AIDS, but who have not been diagnosed with a laboratory biopsy test. "Studies have shown that between 10 and 15 percent of AIDS patients have been diagnosed through clinical rather than laboratory methods and they aren't included in our AIDS figures," Dondero said. "We've gotten a lot of input through clinical physicians who deal a lot with AIDS and also through public health specialists in heavy AIDS areas." Dondero said the revised definition of AIDS could increase the number of reported AIDS cases in the United States by 20 percent. "This doesn't mean there is suddenly going to be X-number more people sud­denly having AIDS," he said. "It's just that there are more people out there with AIDS than we officially count because of our current definition of the disease." The new definition would add 6,500 cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome to the 32,825 cases reported to the CDC as of last Monday, a spokes­man said. The revised definition will include two more diseases known to be asso­ciated with the AIDS virus infection­the Dementia complex, a deteriorating infection of the brain, and the wasting syndrome, a chronic duration of fevers, diarrhea and appreciable weight loss in people with AIDS virus infection. The most common opportunistic infection attacking AIDS victims is pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, a parasitic infection of the lungs. Of the 32,825 AIDS cases, 21,203 of them have or did have that infection. ~-h .e~~ r/Y.!n.~<1cCfJ....<1gn.,o/o/fou,,fon FLOWERS &GIFTS Special Big outdoor Plant sale Sat. & Sun. 3/20 & 3/21 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted 24 MONTROSE VOICE MARCH 20. 1987 Gay and lesbian reading =============from============ A·L·Y·S·O·N PUBLICATIONS LOVE SEX LOVESEX: The horny relationship chronicles of Mu: Exander, by Max Ex antler, $7 00. Exander gives a vivid d"'-scription of his personal six-month odyssey toward establishing a lasting gay relationc;hip which incorporates safer s<x SECRET DANGERS, by John Preston, SS 00 In "his Jatc<;t msrallment of the Alex Kane senes, ex·marine Kane and his yClung partner, Danny Fonelli, battle a worlJ·wide terronst ring that is using vu !ence against gays to promote its own ends BELDON'S CRIMES, by Robert Rein­hart, $7 .00. A grisly sex murder and a homophobic job dismissal suddenly tum Dave Bcldon's life upside-down. When be decides to fight for his rights, he becomes the country's most recognized gay man. But soon the question arises: Will Dave Beldon ultimately be the vic­tor - or victim of the three-ring media cllcus that surrounds him? A new and original novel hom the author of A History of SiUJdows "Now for my next trick ... " NOW FOR MY NEXT TRICK , by Michael Willhoite, $5.00. Michael Will­hoite's cartoons have been entertaining readers of The Washington Blade for many years. Now,. some 80 of his best cartoons have been collected mtO this book. EIGHT DAYS A WEEK, by Larry Duplechan, $7 00 Johnnie Ray Rousseau is a 22-year-old black gay pop singer whose day starts at 11 pm. Keith Keller is a white banker with a 10 o'clock bedtime - and muscles to die for. This st0ry of their love affair is one of the most engrossing - and funniest - you'll ever read. MEDITERRANEO, by Tony Patrioli, $12.50. Through some 46 photos, Italian photographer Tony Patrioli explores the homo-erotic territOry in which, since the beginning of time, adolescent boys have discovered sex. !Oversize paperback) THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $7 .00. Burton Raider's problems begin in high school when he realizes he's in love wuh his fnend Roman. As he gets older, the problems increase - and so does the humor of his situation, in what Chris­topher Street calls ''the funniest gay novel of the year" QUATREFOIL, by James Bart, $8.00. The year is 1946, and Philip Froelich faces a court martial for acting insubor­dmate to a lazy officer during the cklsing days of World War II. Then he meetS Tim Danelaw, and soon the court mar­tial is among the least of Phillip's con­cerns . .. This classic novel, first published in 1950, remains a romantic and suspense­ful read, an intelligently-written love story that gives a vivid picture of our re­cent but often-forgotten past. SECOND CHANCES, by Florine de Veer, $7 .00. ls it always harder to accept what is offered freely? Jeremy, young and still naive about the gay world, could easily have the love of his devoted friend Roy, yet instead he finds himself pursu­ing the handsome and unpredictable Mark. Leag Tint Passlllf. UV(S ti tldtr L(S81aftS .... ~-----,.· LONG TIME PASSING: Lives of Older Lesbians, edited by Marcy Adelman, $8.00. In their own words, women talk about age-related concerns: the fear of losing a lover; the experiences of being a lesbian in the 1940s and 1950s; and issues of loneliness and community ACT WELL YOUR PART, by Don Sakers, $5.00. When Keith Graff moves with his mother to a new t0wn, he feels like the new kid who doesn't fit in. Then he 1oms hlS high school's drama club and meets the boyishly cute Bran Daven­port REFLECTIONS OF A ROCK LOBSTER: A story about growing up gay, by Aaron Fricke, SS.00 The moving auto­biography of Aaron Fricke, who made na­tional news when be took a gay date to his high school prom. SEX POSITIVE, by Larry Uhng, $7 .00. Many religious leaders have distorted Biblical passages to condemn homosex­uality. Here Uhrig fights back, discuss­ing positive Biblical views of same-sex relationships, and arguing that sexuality and spiri tuality are closely linked THE SPARTAN, by Don Hartison, $6.00. In the days of the first Olympics, gay relationships were a common and valued part of life. The Spartan tells the story of a young athlete and his adven­tures m love and war, providing a vivid picture of classical Greece, the early Olympics, and an important part of our history. A 8LACI( GAY ANTHOLOGY l IN THE LIFE: A black gay anthology, e<l11cd by Joseph Beam, $8.00. When Joseph Beam became frustrated that so little gay male literature spoke to him as a black ~ay man, he decided to do some­thmg about it. The result is this an· thology, in which 29 contributors, through "wries, cs!'>ays, verse and art­work, have made heard the voice of a too-often silent minority . THE MEN WITH THE PINK TRIANGLE, by Heinz Heger, $6.00 Thousands of gays were thrown into Nazi concentration camps for the crime of homosexuality. Heinz Heger is the only one ever to have told his stOry. Here is a chilling recollection of one of the most frightening chapters of our gay past WORLDS APART, edited by Camilla Decamin, Eric Garber and Lyn Paleo, $8.00. These collected science fiction stories present a wide array of imagina­tive characters, from a black lesbian vampire to a gay psychodroid. Here is adventure, romance, and excitement - and perhaps some genuine alternatives for our future. -----TO ORDER----- Enclosed is $ __ . Please send the books I've listed below. !Add $1.00 postage when order­ing ;ust one book; if you order more than one we'll pay postage.) Visa and Mastercard accepted; enclose acct. no., exp. date, and signature. Send me these books: name---------­address --------­city state. zip _____ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS Dept. P-5 40 Plympton St ~---~~~~~~~~~--- MARCH 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 25 r----------- Spanish Flower Bishops to Warn Pope of Gay Protest By Paula Butturini VATICAN CITY (UPI)-A group of American bishops met with Pope John Paul !! Wednesday to brief him on his upcoming United States trip, which some clergymen say may spark pro­tests. As is customary, the Vatican released no details of what was said during the private papal audience, which also was attended by a small group of senior Vat­ican officials. A Vatican statement said only that the meeting was called to discuss plans for the papal visit and gave "the parlici· pants an opportunity to exchange infor­mation and views on the pastoral visit and its potential for fostering the life of the church in the United States." U.S. delegates declined to reveal spe· cifics of their talks, but Archbishop John May of St. Louis said the meeting wrnt "fine." Tuesday night May said the group planned to tell the pope about the possi· bility of protests during his visit, ache· duled for Sept. 10· 19. May, president of the U.S. bishops conference, said he expected the topic of possible protests-especially by ga rights groups in San Francisco-to · discussed. "It would be a real disservice not to," May said. "I'm sure we'll discuss how best to react to possible problems." Gay rights groups have promised to protest the papal visit to demonstrate their dissatisfaction with a Vatican doc­ument issued last October that labeled all homosexual acts ''an intrinsic moral evil." The U.S. delegation is composed of20 American prelates, including the bishops of eight of the nine clioceses John Paul will visit next fall. Bishop Ernest Unterkoefler of Charleston, S.C., could not attend because of a schedule conflict, the Vatican said. The group was to meet twice a day Wednesday and Thursday and once again early Saturday with Vatican offi­cials involved in organizing the tour. John Paul was expected to attend only Wednesday's first session and then lunch with the group after their meet· ings ended Saturday. May said the group had prepared a slide show for John Paul to accompany their oral reports but that Vatican offi­cials had asked them to skip the visual presentation. During the tour John Paul will visit Miami, Columbia, S.C., New Orleans, San Antonio, Phoenix, Ariz., Los Angeles, Monterey, Calif., San Fran· cisco and Detroit. ArchbiHhop Edward McCarthy in Miami, where the papal visit begins Sept. 10, said March 15 he would stress the Florida church's role in helping set· tie two major waves of Cuban refugees, plus a minor wave of Haitian refugees. The bishops were expected to respond during the trip to criticisms of laxness in U.S. Catholicism. The rift between the U.S. church and the Vatican was apparent this month when the Vatican condemned all artificial techniques of conception, such as test-tube babies. Experts quickly predicted rank-and.file Catholics would largely ignore the ban. "I think the Holy See is going to use BACCHUS Sunday, March 22 Bacchus Rodeo Contestants Fund Raiser Show at Spm Smoked Brisket Plate s1so Mary Ann Mahoney & Mata Hari 6pm March 22 and 29 Every Friday s1 2s Long Necks until 9pm All Your Favorite C&W Music No Cover Every Thursday is Steak Night Happy Hour until 9pm Bring Your Own Steak. We Supply the Rest. Thurs.-Fri.-Sat.-Sun. Blackjack Table opens at 7pm Happy Hour Tues.-Fri. until 9pm 523 Lovett 523-3396 this opportunity in a very helpful way to discuss what is happening in the United States," said McCarthy. McCarthy discounted suggestions that the Pope's American visit would be a "disciplinary" one aimed at driving home the points of fidelity and obe­dience to the church. "Now, as a father, he will want to clear up ambiguities about where he stands, and he'll sometimes repeat some church teachings," McCarthy said. "But I don't imagine him scolding." The Vatican was criticized last year when it stripped the Rev. Charles Cur­ran of his right to teach theology at the Catholic University of America becauEe of his liberal beliefs on sexual matters. Last year the Vatican transferred key powers from Seattle Archbishop Ray· mond Hunthausen to an auxiliary bishop, for Hunthausen's alleged lack of firmness. "The bishops are worried that if Hun­thausen was picked off, they might be too," said the Rev. Richard McCormick, a theology professor at Notre Dame University. "They think maybe the Vatican may be getting one-sided information. It's time to respond to that and give a broader picture." ~Pl~y ~safe! Mexican Restaurant 4701 N Main 869-1706 A Taste of Mexico 24 Hours Daily Luncheon Special llam-2pm Sparush Flower Dinnerc Beet Enchilada. Chicken Tostado. Chile con Queso. Rice. Beans reg 575 Special $3.75 Chicken Fajitas for 2 $8.95 Good Any Trme With this Ad Expires end of the month Closed Tuesday lOOOpm. LR~~~::m-=~a:i~~~ ..J CRAB LICE STUDL-.Y...~.... .-~ ___..( Baylor College of Medicine Department of Dermatology is conducting a study of a new crab lice treatment. Volunteers may be male or female, between 18-65 years old, and diagnosed as having crab lice within the last 24 hours. Volunteers will be compensated. Call 799-6137. 26 MONTROSE VOICE I MARCH 20, 1987 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS BONDSMAN CONSIGNMENTS A·OUICK BAIL BONDS FINDINGS. 2037 Norfolk. 522-3662 F .t CCl1Jni"' IS d1~creet. al' type 11 -uoul'JO"SPlAI AC bonds madt• M1chaef E Standage. agen1 Mention the Voice lor $25 olf ati qual1hed bonds 678-4488. 621-8452 ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep 1t listed here in the Voice where hter- 11\y thousands turn each week TARGET YOUR MARKET A brochure. newsletter. promotion can help our business target your goats and reach your market Call 524--0409 - VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a Vo1ceClass1!1ed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge 1t on your Amer~ can E•i>ress Diners Club MasterCard VIS8 or Carte Blanche Layout Design, Production Copy Spec1aliz1ng in Retail. Medical and Scientific Areas 523-5606 ANNOUNCEMENTS KELLY BRADLEY. M.B.S R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN lnd1v1dua1 fam1fy and group practice lmuted to coping-stress. rote relation­ships and sell·concept 1nterven11on C'tfice 623-6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voice a general circutahon n~ .... s· paper having published con11nuously tor over 5 years is qual1!1ed to ace - - """' .. 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Ask About Free Trial Offer Call Jim at 622-4240 EIK!~~~~e"IM Office Hours 10ern-4pm Mon · Fri ANTIQUES F1NOINGS 2037 Norto11t_ 5;(2 itib2 SEE OUR DISl'l.A YAO To advertise. cal 529-8490 during business hours YESTERDAY"$ ViORLD ANTIQUES. 1715 Westheimer. 526-2646 :;El 1,qOI Pi.AYAD AnhquM • Esl•le Sales • Consignments COnsJgnments ..,., lOJ7 Norfolk __ _...,..__....,,,. 52?-JH2 ATTORNEY JAMES D HESS. 3407 Ml)ntr 12('C- 521-9216 PHYLLIS FRYE 72J-.8368 General prac· t1ce of law ELAINE SHAW 222· 7772, 645· )159 S£E - - Al AL ELAINE SHAW : t~~i'!e1r a! .~~w • Pr • tl'T' y ,.aw e A1 oi ·t 222-7772 or 645-3159 AUTO REPAIR MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR ~5'6 Genesee (100 Pacific) 52~3723 sEEnR Pl.A.YAO ~.6.LVIN AUTOMOTIVE 524-8219 E R P(A>'AD TAFT AUTOMOTIVE. 1411 Tait ,22-2190 -E OUROISPlAYAO NEAATOWN KAAZ 1901 Taft !524-8601 -f OUR Ol.!>PLAY AO WEST GRAY AUTO. 2111 w Gr•w 5?8-J.~ WORRIED ABOUT YOUR CAR? Lei Bfl.r ,. lr John tlieck 11 JUI Exper•l!nced. Oependabl Mechanic. AeaS<Jr1able Aal8! SALVIN AUTOMOTIVE 524-1219 1:;~~~it MONTROSE AUTO REPAIR Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed 2516 Genesee (100 Pacific) 526-3723 Corbureto ;p 101 ·.t · tnca1 ·.>epo1r• Al BrakeW"'k BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS 01no'1 Barber Shop 302 W- 1 Hh Haircuts $6 up. 863-1520 tor appointment Tommy's Barber Shop. haircuts $10 and up 2154 Portsmouth Appointments 528- 8216 HA1AcuTS BY MIKE. 522-::.3003- SEE OUR DISPLAY AD JoN BA ATON 1515'J\-DU018vy 522-7866 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO UNION JACK. 1212 weslhe1mer 528--9600 >EE ('"Jq 0 'iP1.AY AO ~Wio-__ SALON 15151'1 Dunlavy 522- 7866 Haircuts, etc. by Mike Shampoo Cut & Blew llr·1 $i·I - by Mike 'no• "Ar ;\1,,n F •-Ii ..;;r !. 522-3003 BARS Knew Mood Nu· bar Second drink lfl"l­p11mentary with mention ol th1s ad 1 .. J6 WMthl 1'T'or 529-3332 GAY BARS The lollow1ng list are onty the gay bars which have placed a recent advertisement 1n the Voice For information on lhese bars. please see their ads For 1n lormat1on on other bars (such as type of chentele). call the Gay Switchboard at 529-3211 or see their ads 1n other pubhcat1ons BRAZOS RIVER BOITOM. 2400 Bra· zos. 528-9192 Sff OUR DISPLAY AO cHures. ii:32 westhe1mer. 523-2213 SEE OUR OISP1.AY AD CAYSTALs-:-OvEALOOKING MONTROSE. 911 W Drew. 522-7524 SEE OUR OISPt.AY AD DIRTY SALL y·s 220 Avondale 529-7525 SH OUR DISPt.AY A() KJ'S. 11830 A1rl1ne 445-5849 SH OUR DtSPt.AY AO MARY'S. 1022 Westheuner, 528-8851 SH OUR DISPt.AY AD MICHAELS. 428 Westhe1mer. 529-2506 SEE OUR OISPl.AY AO RENDEZVOUS. 1100 Westhe1mer 527-8619 ,, O'JR 01 PLAY AO ROCK N" HORSE 5731 Kirby 520-9910 't"'llfOI PLAYAD THE 611. 611 Hyde. 528-9079 >1"£ OUR OISPl.AY AD VENTURE·N. 2923 Main 522-0000 -·· OUR Di'SPlAY AD BOOKKEEPING BOOKKEEPING SERVICE Personal. commercial. taxes 467·3871 BOOTS Oh Boy' Quality Boots. 912 Westhe1mer 524-7859 CARS AND BIKES SELL YOUR CAR 1hrough a Montrose Voice eta!! 1hed ad Call 529-8490 STERLING Chauffer driven Rolls Royces available tor all occasion• or just tor the fun of It. Call Ken at 932-9401 CHURCHES KINGDOM COMMUNt .... Y CHU :H 614 E 191h. 880-35 '7 11-4217 SU OUR 01SPl.AY AD CENTER FOR A POSITIV::: LIFESTYLE 531-6600 SEE OUR CSP AY ~l Center for a Positive Lifestyle A Un;tni Ml'Pl.Apt;, :&!. "•1 "'lb.al C111..tini.t1 in meets LJownwwn Holl.rt&y Jnn, 801 C.lhoun HUY Monday ftpm ,ormorelnfo DIA1 497- PRAY Kini::dom Commumty Church ·Join Our Family in 1987 614 E. 19th Sundays l lam 880-3S27 or 3S1-4217 CLEANING SVCS Hate housework? Let Lavelle (713) 529 0228 BRIGHTEN UP WITH BRIGHT Excellent h0usekeep1ngserv1ce Aehable Reas•:mable rates 529-6798 SERVICE PLUS A Ou•llty Cleaning Senile• Rnldenllal • Commercial e BONDED e Jett Cunnlngh•m 522-3451 COFFEE COFFEE & TEA WORLD. °3939-R Montrose. 524-8536 )ff OUR 01 P• AY AD Coffee & Tea World Gourmet Coffee • Fine Teas Accessories 3939-R Montrose Blvd. 713-524-8536 -TO TOW T\.IE LINE I -TO FILL THE BILL, l'M BL£55£D WITH LOVED­ONES TO tNDOW; -TO rnRN M<{ 'W!JKL'< Pff<. AND EARN I \.IAVE. M'< A~~m No.J COULD PAY A NATION'S DEBT. 1 GIVE WITH JOi, AND m­\ F LIFE IS TRUL~ LIKE A PAlll, AND LIKE ALL 1HIN&5 MUST t:ND ... CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING ALL AMEAtCAN CoNsTAuCT10N 827-1422 or 497-5228 JEE OUR DISP1.AY AO HsK coNTAACTING. 520-9064 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO COUNSELING DA NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 Welch. 527-8680 >EE OUR DISPUY AD DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. DD s- 427 Westhe1mer. 524-0538 SEE OUR DISPtAY A(l RONALD A PETERS. DDS 620 W Ala­bama 52:.'>-2211 Ronald M. Butler D.D.S. 42: Wes1he1nwr Ho~r· rx ~ ... Mnru'liiv 1hru S.1luu1ly Hours by Appom1nwnl (713) 524 0538 DWELLINGS. ROOMMATES. HDUSES/APTS. FOR SALE. RENT. LEASE Three ·t. 1r '"' S $2 eff1c1er .:,y S:.uu B1 p d Hut tub. yard. laundry. near downtown 523-7133 No deposit ease GWM seeks responsible roommate to share 2 bedroom. security barred house Montrose $275-$300 total Alter 2pm 524· 125 Serious calls only Montroaecondo- 815K1pl1flg 1.1.clean and quiet. controlled entrance. covered secure parking $365/mo 529-1920. 520. 9361 Attract111e. updated 2-1, hardwoods. I.re­place. all apphances. new paint and mini· blinds Owner pays water and yard maintenance. $585 Call Duoe 464-0072 Professional executive GWM seeks same to share mce Montrose home Great hosue with pool RelerencM requi red 529- 1784 For sale-townhome Large. very pnv•te end um!. 3br. 2 lull buth. lofl. 2cargarage. cathedral ce1hngs. 2 story. stone ltre· place. many gaY$ Best offer 442-1992 - FREE A-PT. I HOME LOCATING Houston/ Gat11eslon area Let me help Call Rob (713) 981-5560 McDUFFIE AT WELCH 1 bedroom. 1 bath all aa_lt 16-uml com­plex Built 1983. high elhc1ency, central air & heat. m1m·blmds. 2 ce1hng tans, cnvered parking $250-$275 981-8473 Foreclosures Bay area, 3-2-2 App $1500 mov&-in 961-7460 Agent Mature female seeking !em housemate (mme or yours) Pisces. Aries or Sag111a­nus with compatible habits. morrung per~ son. no addictions. affectionate with animals and people. music lover an types. ~~es~~~~~ football. humor, metaphys- Montrose one bedroom apt 1nsma11 quiet complex with pool. securi ty gates. laundry lac1h11es. cable ava1table Adults No pets S100dep $265pluselectnc 713· 529-8178 TOWNE PLAZA APARTMENTS. 4655 r:~~~!~"dJ~~~/~~~17880 VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Voice Class1!1ed Call 529-6490 And ~~:rg~u·~:Cr~~r ti;ne;~canMEa~~~r~I~; Visa EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTEO Houston M1dtowne Spa is accepting applicahons, cashier experience pre­ferred Recent photo required. 522·2379 3100 Fannin INSIDE ADVERTISING SALES Wanted Bright. very articulate ind1v1du· als with a good business sense to work with established perlormmg arts publica­hons Call Mr Schwartz 52&-5323, 11am· 3pm landscaper in suburban New Y-ork needS helper cutting grass Prefer well built black man 5200 week plus room April to November Send self descnphon/ photo to Walter Krayer 242 South St New Provi­dence. NJ 07974 Female keyboard player needed tor accompanying s1ngor Please call Gerry at 661·3872 PERFORMING ARTS Box olllce seeks qual1!1ed personnel, excellent verbal skills required. After­noon. eyening or botl'·· Call Mr. Schwartz 526-5323 ESTA TE SALES FINDINGS. 2037 Norfolk_ 522-3662 SE OUR OISPL Y Al (MISC.I FOR SALE BALDWIN PIANOS At factory d•recl d1<:>(.u1.mt prices For 1nformat1on cai: 8111 Shirley 713-':i28· 3333 FOR YARD SALES See ads under Yard Sa• s at tile end >f the voice c1ass11teds FUNERAL DIRECTORS SOUTHWEST FUNERAL DIRECTORS 1218 Welch 526-3851 ff"OURD~P AYAO CREMATION SERVICE INTERNATIONAL. 3400 Montrose. 529-6666 SU OUfl ['SP AY Ari GIFTS CHRISTMAS CRITTERS. 1318 Nance ~LE OJR 01~PLAY AO GYMS PARKWAY ATHLETIC clue. 800 Rosrne, 528·5467 HAULING HAULING, ETC. PICk up end de•1very. hauhng. bonded Jell Cunningham. >22- ~451 INSTRUCTION PARALEGAL CLASSES • TEA Approved • Tuition Financing • Placement A11l1lance CAREER INSTITUTE 529-2778 3015 Richmond Ave. INSURANCE BRIAN LOHSE 5 16 OE >re! 266 Mh2 EE OUR n1 ,p, AY AD CYNTHIA H MANSKER INSURANCE J.'. 1 w Alabama #100 -;n-._192 CEOUAr P A'fAO Ar• your Ured of struggling with the high cost of lnsur•nce? C•ll lod•y lor • lrH competllfve quole. Cynthie H. Mansker Insurance Agency 522-2792 Milo e ~-- e Aenltn eLHe •Heellh Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice LAWN CARE SETTER LAWNS & GARDENS 523-LAWN Sff OUfl DISPLAY Al STIXX AND CHIPS INC 665..£294 332-4443 .,,EC · - Stixx and Chips, Inc. 665-6294 or 332-4443 We do yards. repair and build w oo d fences, light hauling, lawn care, light mov­ing, house cleaning, p ai n t ing , gutters, small house repairs. Free Estimates LEATHER LEATHER BY BOOTS. 711 Fa1Mew 526-2668 5Ef0tJROSPLAYAI MEDICAL CARE STEVE D MARTINEZ. M 0 12 Oaks Tower. 4126 SW Fwy 111000, 6"1· 7771 FABRE CLINIC. 5500 Crawford. '52&- 2320 $EEOI MOOELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS Rx: RELAX Magage by Bill o·Rourke. MST Stale registered masseur No 0431 24 hours. low rates. in or out 869-2298 Deep muscle. sensuous body rub. eYen· ings and weekends leave message SteYe 640-6690 REGISTERED MASSEUSE ~~1=~~~~$j0" ~;~~i~8~~~~8~ s~ooc;~~~- 5557 Bodyrub by Dan Muscular. hairy. hand- 5ome. healthy (713) 278·7380 Hou51on. handsome. healthy. honest mascuhne Reasonable rates (7131 988- 0402 Marc Sensual - Swedish massage. weekdays after 7 Sunday anyt1mE 4~ ·4014 Rubdowns by Robb 5:; 1081 THE CADILLAC OF MASSAGE by David D of E I (711) 52 ·8;>:12 STOP getting rubbed the wr mg way Call Carl 622-3942 late night For exciting. lun·filled body rub c811 Peter at 464·8781 Body rubs by 8111. after 6pm weekdays, 24 hours weekends 529·3970 THOM Of HOUSTON 523-6577 A PREMIUM SERVICE Body Rub 24 hrs. 52&-3711 Stimulating body rubs Out calls 529· 3970 MOVERS MOVEMASTERS Boxes, tool! Visa. MC. Amex wt 1925 Westhf 1mt r 630-65 NURSE CARE ATTENTION life partner lam1hei- of PWA! Team if two nurses will providt· total care r y1 ur home Reasonable rat&. .>1).7630 PAPER HANGING All AMERICAN CONSTRUCTION 827- 1422 or 497-5228 ~ff 0 IA D•.,PtA'f AD ~aper Hanging and Vinyl Resldentlal and Comm&fclol AH Types Remodeling ALL AMERICAN CONSTllUCTION 827-1422 or 497-5228 PERSONALS Ti11. GWM. Latin lover seeks Hispanic men !or dat tng and sale sex 861-4801 Houston bonom would 1~ k e to meet dom•­nant top man tor sexual encounters _ Reply Bhnd Box 334-C c/o Voice MARCH 20, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 ~at~er~~d~~~o~1~t~~gk~~~~~ ~:~ Blind Box 334-R c/o Voice Needing a hot black male escort for a hot physical and daily workoul'> Just call and ask for Adam 663-6269 Call 24 hrs a day You hke organ music. alfec:tion. stainless steel. floors. red. mascuhn1ty. adYenture. have a 29· waist or less 529-3983 Open minded attract1Yeyoung black male is interested 1n meetmg and servicing sm­gle or marned horny ladies. couples, les· b1ans. too. Also b1courivoytosexyTVand TS. Age, size. race. not important. but cleanmess a must• Call Casper 522-0556 LEATHERMAN SEXLINK Get ofl with 1000's of leathermen hke youi No phony actors Pnvate. conl1den· 1181 No bill to phone but lng-'dst One-on­one. man-to-man connections Low-cost 24-hour S&M Hotline 415/346-8747 - SAN FRANCISCO BOUND Need responsrble roommate to relocate to San Francisco area For inqu1r1es. write San Francisco bound P 0 Box 272671 Houston 77277-2671 Houston bottom desires dominant man into bid for progrets1Ye. 1magmat1ve encounters Prefer talt. bearded. but all 33 and over considered Friendship and relat1onsh1p-oriented Complete dom1na· !Ion considered Proless1ona1 seeking same Reply Blind Bnx 332·S Clo Voece Live ACTION NETWORK. 97&-8500 nllR P Al A[ PLAY . safely at J O E Meetings 5 nights a week And 1t's tun. (S~ our olher ad. LISA'S RECORDED LOVE STORIES ** SHE WILL WHISPER * SWEET NOTHINGS IN * * YOUR EAR * ** CALL 900 0 3 * * DIRECT ~:900:!~0:3;~~ * NOW! 1-900-410-3800 * ** NO MEMBERSHIP NECESSARY ** ~0° IOI ·11 '"'"""' ' * lS' ' "" 'aa .. 110"• · ......... , * * * * * * * * * * RULES FOR THE PERSONALS Person­als (and other advertising) should not describe or imply a description of sexual organs or acts No Personals should be directed to minors Advertising must be pos1llYe.~ not '"negative."' (II you have certain preferences m other people. hst the quaht1es you desire Please don"t be negative by listing the kinds of people or Qualities you don"t desire) Thank you. and happy hunting AN EROTIC ADVENTURE The Society of J 0 E a private organiza· PETS ANGELS TO ZEBRAS Petworld 11725 Eastex Freeway .Al E Ml Houston 590-0471 TOM'S PAETIY F1SH. 224 W 520-6443 SEE '"XJllO PHOTO FINISHING 1 HOUR QUALITY PHOTO WE DO IT All' Printing and developing enlargements. iumbo prints. film. Kodak paper, 2615 Waugh Dr. 520-1010. He-NRV"S 1 HOUR PHOTO. 428' West· he1mer. 529--0869 SEE OUR OISP<.AY AD PRINTING SPEEDY PA1Nf1NG. 5400 Be la1re Blvd 667-7417 SffOUfflJ YAO PSYCHOLOGISTS DR NICHOLAS EDD. 2128 Welch. 527-8680 -~ -1"- lAYAO Dr. Nicholas Edd, Psy.D PSYCHOLOGIST rnsur~nce Accepled-24 Hour Phone Service Merr.:>r'81 City Pro! Bkjg 902 Fto$t .... o0d S!e 269 H~ton77024 ..es2377 Montrnse 2128 Wei :h. 527-8680 RESTAURANTS CHAP-UL TEPEC. 813 A1~hmnnd 522-2365 SEE OUR ()/SPLAY AD CHARLIE'S-. 1102 Westheimer.522-3332 SEE OUR 0 SPlA'f AO CAFE Eot. w Alatiama at shePhard 520-5221 £ OUR PIAYAD ~~~TPLACE~ -2109 0-1.mtavy SH OURf> PiA'fAO PIZZA INN. 3105 S Shepherd 52~5676 S_ff OUR ;> AY AO POT PIE 1525 Westhe1mer 5~4350 SEE ()UR l'.HSPLA\' AO VIET NAM RESTAURANT 321~ Main al ~P'~· ~2~!~AC\ 'tH!' PO't VIE Open 24 Hours a Day 1525 Westhelmer 528-4350 ~~~. f~~~=sinna:zs a~~~t,1;e :dd~:~.~~~ r ~ times are 8-9pm Tues & Thurs. 11pm-t1a~~ a~l~~~u;:~ t,~P~a~~~c a~ ~:a~0~j I house Look for PtaySafe flag ) I CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING ~~Z~~"~~(;-~~~~':~~ ~1~d~~v;i,~~ I Montrose Voice Open Monday-Frid 1y 9am--6pm SAFE SEX? For your mental health. have sex For your physical health. make it sate sex Sale sex is where there are no bodily llwds exchanged The Y1rus which leads to an AIDS condrt1on is behaved usually 1rans­m1tted from one person to another from blood or semen Those who are ·recep· t1ve"' are especially at nsk Do condoms protect? They certainly help. But con­doms MUST be used with a water-based lubricant (the new prOduct lubrasep!lc 1s especially recommended) Petroleum or vegetabl~based lubncants will actually dissolve the condom and eliminate the pr0tect1on Ple8$e "Play Sale" A CLASSIFIED AFFAIR? ohn Preston and Frederick Brandt can how you hOw to have active lun or play passive games with the personal Ids In their book ·c1ass1fled Alla1rs ·they'll tell you how to write an ad that realty stands - it. what to expect wlien you pJace or respond to an ad. and even what all those funny ltltle abbrev1at1ons mean Send 58 to ··c1ass1hed Affairs. Alyson Pub . Oepl P-S. 40 Plympton. SI Boston MA 02118 !A190 mcluded w1U be a coupon for 55 off on your next Personals in your chorce ol 25 pubt1cat1 ins. inc ludmg the Voice) PEST CONTROL TEXAS TEAM 0 PEST 526-111 1 --f OVR DISPLAY AO RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL l23-4000 if · A\'Al Specializing In I Chicken •Fish • Pasta I Anytime with this I Coupon I per party of two 520-5221 I Shepherd at W. Alabama ------- _1 STORES (MISC. ITEMSI THE EAGLE 1544 West. 5 14.7;- 3 SUPERMARKETS KROGER ., Mor rM TIRES THE TIRE PLACE. 1307 Fa1rv1ew S?Q-l4l~ PLAYAO ··~ 529-1414 t•THE 11 I\ E PLACE ALL BRANDS 1307 Fairview ')blksWE,1 M( TRAVEL SPLASH DAY '87 Round trip transportation. champagne and keg beef Make your reservat10ns today by calling Robert 529-£330 Visa. Mastercard/ AMEX. Diners Ctub-' C1rie Blanche accepled NEW-ORLEANSGUEST HOUsf 1110 Ursulines. (504) 566-1177 SEE OUR !MSP\.AY AO FRANKL.IN GUEST H
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