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Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996
File 016
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Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 016. 1996-03-29. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 17, 2017. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/827.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-03-29). Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/827

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996 - File 016, 1996-03-29, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 17, 2017, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/841/show/827.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 805, March 29, 1996
Contributor
  • Darbonne, Sheri Cohen
Publisher Window Media
Date March 29, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Rights In Copyright: This item is protected by copyright. Copyright to this resource is held by the creator or current rights holder, and the resource is provided here for educational purposes. It may not be reproduced or distributed in any format without permission of the copyright owner. Users assume full responsibility for any infringement of copyright or related rights.
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE / MARCH 29. 1996 15 Texas chapter of NLGJA meets in Houston BUSINESS "Navigating the 90's," the conference theme, focused on the challenges faced by gay and lesbian journalists in a turbulent era marked by upheavals in the news business and fast-paced changes in the means and concept of mass communications. (Indeed, participants in the "Ask the Editors" panel noted that we in the throes of an age in which a massive amount of information is delivered to society that is not "filtered" through what we the media, nor the mission or ethics of that institution). The bulk of the conference, however, centered on more traditional and familiar issues faced by gay and lesbian journalists, such as coming out. A panel discussion titled "Coming Out to Colleagues. Sources and the Community" brought together a diverse group of journalists who shared their own "coming out" stories. Interestingly, the group included people in various stages of the process, and even a heterosexual reporter who admitted having occasionally allowed those he has interviewed to believe he is gay. The panelists' stories revealed a wide range of experiences, as well as divergent views regarding what it means to be 'out.' Todd Camp relayed how he was transferred from his job as editor of Class Acts, a special children's magazine section of the Fort Worth Star Telegram, and reassigned to a feature writing position in January, after a single reader complained about cartoons by Camp that had previously run in the Texas Triangle, a gay newspaper. Camp lamented that while a flood of stories in both the mainstream and gay press identified him .is an "openly gay editor." he wasn't sure what the term meant. "I'd been in the position (editing the children's magazine) for tour years, and there had never been a problem," until the newspaper received a single letter from a reader who had received a copy of one of Camp's cartoons in a mailing from the anti-gay Texas Family Assoc lat ion and recognized his name. "The letter itself was rather innocuous," said Camp, "It didn't ask for punishment, it just said that the woman felt the cartoon was inappropriate." The cartoon in question showed the strip's main character having a steamy cyber-chat, then going into hysterics after learning his "computer sex" partner is 14. It was included in a mailout from TFA targeting ihe Triangle's advertisers, among others, with the apparent suggestion that it promoted pedophilia. "My comment is, you would have to be a complete ami total idiot to misinterpret the meaning of this cartoon," Camp fumed. And although Star Telegram Executive Editor Debbie Price insisted the transfer wasn't a "gay issue". Camp said the experience taught him that, even in his progressive workplace (the Fori Worth paper is one of the few media outlets in Texas lhat provides domestic partner benefits), there is still much work to be done and a great need for an organization like NLGJA. Ironically, the mode rami ol ihe panel. Juan Palomo, currently the religion reporter for the Austin American Statesman, reported that a religious tight minister's effort to target him had much less effect. Palomo, best known locally as a columnist for the now-defunct Houston Post, told the group ih.it TFA'S director. Wyatt Roberts, had sent a letter to pastors in the Austin area advising them ol the new Statesman religion reporter's sexual orientation and the fact that he, also, had contributed columns to the Triangle. Palomo noted that he has not had any pastors decline to be interviewed by him; he has, however, received calls offering support. "I have yet to have any problems because of this," he said. "It's a luxury to be out, and not have to worry about these things." Others offered a sharply different take on the out-in-the-workplace issue. Dan Meador, director of weather communications for KHOU-TV Houston (Channel 11), puzzled: "What does that mean, being 'out?' If your definition of 'out' is having a picture of your lover on your desk.. .1 don't know if I'm comfortable wilh that. I have my work and I have my (social) life," said Meador, a 25-year TV veteran who has been an on-the-air meteorologist with the Houston station since 1982. "I'm farther along than I used to be. Before, people would come up to me in the bars and say, 'hey, aren't you that weather guy?' and I'd say, 'No..J just look like him.' I don't do that anymore. Now. I'm not afraid to let people know." Meador added this advice for on-the-air gays in broadcasting: "Just keep your nose clean...act responsibly." Tim Halley Awards Presented Two journalists received awards at the NLGJA state conference, both for stories lhat appeared in Texas gay/lesbian newspapers. Andrew Edmonson received a Special Merit Award for feature siories he wrole lor The Houston Voice, while John McCoy of the Dallas Voice received the Tim Halley Achievement Recognition Award for a scries of news stories on AIDS issues. The Texas NLGJA Awards are named in honor of Halley, a journalist lor ihe II c an in ii ii I Enterprise and association hoard member who lost his battle wilh AIDS in 1994. Martha Liebrum, former assistant managing editor for the Housion Post judged this year's competition. A new award, for workplace advocacy, had also been introduced this year. However, an award was not presented as the association did not receive any nominations in time for the conference. The conference also included a presentation on using the Internet for news gathering and inter-media communications: a luncheon featuring keynote speaker Daniel Helminiak (see related story) and entertainment by Houston comedian Nancy Ford, who is also columnist for Outsmart magazine. The National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association is an organization of news media p ro f e s s i o n a I s whose goals include making newsrooms more hospitable for gay and lesbian journalists: fostering fair. comprehensive and accurate coverage of lesbian and gay issues; stimulating dialogue on professional and ethical issues; and serving as a professional and social network. The organization has a total of about 1200 members in the United States and Canada. This year's conference was the fourth annual event for ihe Texas chapter. Individuals interested in the chapter, its activities, or the NLGJA can obtain more information by calling 220-6025. Fitness Exchange signs 'DFZ' pledge Following a discussion with Suzanne Anderson Properties that settled initial concerns about an ad to be placed in the lobby of his fitness club. Fitness Exchange owner Al McClerren has signed on as the latest participant in the Discrimination Free Zone, a project of the Houston Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus and the African- American Lesbian/Gay Alliance. Rick Barnes, a Realtor with Suzanne Anderson Properties, had purchased space on an advertising board in the Fitness Exchange lobby, according to Anderson. The real estate company generally touts itself as "Houston's Lesbian, Gay, Bi and Transgender Realtor" in all advertising. After some discussion regarding the ad, McClerren agreed to place it in the lobby of his Kirby Drive business and to commit to participation in the Discrimination Free Zone. Barnes and Anderson said. The DFZ initiative is intended to encourage businesses, particularly those with a sizeable gay clientele, to publicly pro claim and affirm a position of non-discrimination. "I am thrilled that we were able to facilitate this process," said Barnes. "We are proud to stand with Mr. McClerren in our fight for equal rights for all Americans." HGLPC President Pat Gandy lauded the Fitness Exchange "for setting an example for other businesses in Houston and across this nation to follow. We must stand tough together in order io bring attention io the unfortunate need for projects like this." "Mr. McClerren called me this morning (Monday) to say that he is proud to support the Discrimination Free Zone initiative," said DFZ chair Clarence Bagby. "We anticipate having at least one hundred participants by ihe end of the year" Bagby also said that AALGA and HGLPC are working with several community organizations to secure commitments to co- sponsor the DFZ. He added that additional information on the program and current participation is being compiled and will be reported soon. VENTURE-N 2911 Mala ■■■■!■■ 322-0000 Photo ky ■ok Mlllor All Day-Wadnasday-AII Night All Longnecks $1 Friday, Match 29th, 9pm G-aest Bartaadeis - Tha R.S.I.C.S.S. Satuiday, April 27th • Mr. Venture-)! Contest Ask a bartender far details.
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